106 Best Restaurants in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Café Tortoni

$ | Centro

Take a seat amid the Tiffany lamps and marble-topped tables, and contemplate the fact that you may be sitting in a chair once occupied by a former president, a renowned tango singer, or a world-famous artist or writer while they nibbled an exquisite pastry. The place and setting are from another age, thankfully well preserved, but you may have to wait for a table at the oldest—and highly popular—café in Buenos Aires. Reservations are a must for the dinner-hour tango show.

Casa Coupage

$$$$ | Palermo

In the middle of the chaos of Palermo, Casa Coupage is an oasis of tranquility. Located in a converted home, the beige-on-beige dining area takes up most of the main floor. Decor is simple, mostly wine related, plus the odd choice of postage stamps glued in a swath around the rooms at eye level. Your best bet is the frequently changing tasting menu that lets you sample the full range of chef Pablo Bolzan's creative take on traditional Argentine cooking. A limited selection of à la carte dishes is always available. Sommelier Santiago Mymicopulo knows his stuff, and his great wine-pairing options are usually a much better value than ordering from the somewhat overpriced wine list.

Casa SaltShaker

$$$$ | Recoleta

While puertas cerradas, or closed-door restaurants, have been a part of the Buenos Aires dining scene for decades, they were historically a place you discovered by word-of-mouth. In 2006, that all changed when Dan Perlman and Henry Tapia, the norteamericano and peruano couple behind this 10-seat communal-table home-dining spot, hit the scene. These days scoring a spot to dig in to their Mediterranean-meets-Andean cuisine, five-course menu with paired wines can be hard to do, so book early. You'll meet new friends, swap stories, and enjoy creative home cooking. The exact address is provided with reservation, made via the website only.

Recommended Fodor's Video

Chan Chan

$$ | Congreso

Peruvian dishes at bargain prices have made a name for Chan Chan. The deep-fried corn kernels they bring while you wait are almost a meal in themselves.

Club Eros

$ | Palermo Soho

Known for its no-frills decor, this Palermo Soho stalwart is where generations of locals have been coming to dine. It's located inside a soccer club of the same name and draws its clientele from club members, neighborhood residents, and pretty much anyone who wants honest cooking that doesn't put a dent in their budget. While the menu features three different pastas and a dozen items off the parrilla (grill), your waiter will tell you what's actually available for the day.

Uriarte 1609, Buenos Aires, 1414, Argentina
11-4832–1313
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: No credit cards, Reservations not accepted

Club Sirio Libanés

$$$$ | Recoleta

Dedicated to the cuisines of the Middle East, this sumptuous dining room on the third floor of the Syrian Lebanese Cultural Club serves up one of the city's best all-you-can-eat buffets. For a flat price you get unlimited trips to the cold appetizers bar, unlimited orders of from a palate-pleasing selection of hot dishes, and all the honey-laden pastries you can pack in. Belly dancers entertain on the weekends, when the prices also rise about 20%. If you're in town for an extended stay, Chef Abdala offers a series of classes where he demonstrates how to duplicate his recipes at home.

Ayacucho 1496, Buenos Aires, 1126, Argentina
11-4806–5764
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: No lunch. Closed Sun., Credit cards accepted

Cuervo Café

$ | Palermo Hollywood

This specialty coffee shop, which roasts its own beans, located on a buzzy Hollywood corner is the ideal spot for a flat white or iced coffee, and a little people watching.

Costa Rica 5801, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Known For
  • In-house coffee roaster
  • Hipster vibe
  • Great caffeine
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Closed Mon.

Cumaná

$ | Barrio Norte

The hearty stews, steaks, and empanadas at chaotic Cumaná are a far cry from Recoleta's European pretensions. Skip dessert, though (nearby ice-cream parlors are better).

Rodríguez Peña 1149, Buenos Aires, C1020ADW, Argentina
11-4813–9207
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Daily noon–12:30 am

Dadá

$$ | Retiro

An intimate and artsy setting are the backdrop for a short but creative menu, which includes house specialties like phyllo-wrapped Morbier cheese salad as a starter and the perfectly cooked ojo de bife (rib-eye steak). Relax, enjoy a glass of wine, read the paper, and eat well.

San Martín 941, Buenos Aires, 1004, Argentina
11-4314–4787
Known For
  • Classy bistro fare
  • Intimate setting
  • Buzzy
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Closed Sun. and Mon.

Delicious

$$ | Recoleta

It's a hard name to live up to, but there's no doubt this casual café pulls it off, with super fresh sandwiches, salads, and smoothies, which you can eat in or pack into your picnic basket. A shot of espresso and a slice of cheesecake provide the perfect dose of caffeine and sugar to get you back in the sightseeing saddle.

Laprida 2015, Buenos Aires, C1425EKU, Argentina
11-4803–1151
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Tues.–Fri. 9 am–8 pm, Sat.–Sun. 10 am –8 pm, Closed Mon.

Desnivel

$ | San Telmo

Don't expect any frills here, just great steaks, and side dishes such as the papas fritas provenzal, golden french fries tossed in fresh parsley and garlic. Take a table in the cavernous dining room, or grab something to go—steak sandwiches and empanadas fly out the door as fast as they can make them. The portions are huge and the prices are relatively reasonable.

Defensa 855, Buenos Aires, 1065, Argentina
11-4300–9081
Known For
  • Casual ambience
  • Large portions
  • Cheap and cheerful
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: No lunch Mon.

Don Carlos

$$ | La Boca

With a prime location right in front of the Boca Juniors stadium, this bodegón is an institution not only for soccer fans but for the likes of movie director Francis Ford Coppola and chef Francis Mallmann. Owner Carlitos Zinola basically chooses your Italo-Argentine menu for you, which could be steak, pasta, tortilla, pascualina tart, or a combination of them all. The neighborhood is dodgy, particularly at night—take a taxi to and from this restaurant.

Brandsen 699, Buenos Aires, Argentina
11-4362–2433
Known For
  • Traditional dining spot
  • Daily menu
  • Located opposite Boca Juniors stadium
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Closed Sun. and Mon.

Down Town Matías

$ | Centro

On a prominent corner of the downtown business district, Down Town Matías is the flagship of a group of Irish-themed pubs. Drop in at lunchtime for a simple steak with mushroom sauce, a well-prepared piece of fish, or a simple sandwich. Pints of ale on tap and plenty of noise, particularly at dinnertime, are the order of the day. Weekday evenings there's an early happy hour followed by live music, generally local rock groups, which can make dinner conversation a challenge. At the other locations outside of downtown, the ambience is a bit more laid-back, and prices are a touch lower.

Due Resto Café

$$ | Barrio Norte

This place may resemble a neighborhood coffee shop where folks are just sitting, sipping coffee, and reading the newspaper. But check out the long and narrow dining room at lunchtime, when the kitchen turns out some of the best pasta and fish dishes in the barrio. The menu changes daily, depending on the chef's whims, but you can count on ravioli showing up in a stunning variety of styles. There are also some excellent stir-fried dishes. Don't pass up dessert, which may include a "deconstructed" take on the classic arroz con leche.

Duhau Restaurant & Vinoteca

$$$$ | Recoleta

An oasis of elegance and grace in the heart of Recoleta, French cooking techniques dominate this kitchen, though the seafood and meat are sourced from Argentina. Standout dishes include butter-soft Angus tenderloin, crispy sweetbreads, and a decadent molten chocolate cake. If the weather is nice, ask for a table on the terrace overlooking the courtyard gardens. Don't miss a pre- or post-dinner visit to the wine-and-cheese bar with a fantastic array of each, and be sure to take an after-meal stroll through the hotel's underground art gallery.

El Desnivel

$$ | San Telmo

At this classic parrilla (steak house) the trimmings don't go beyond a mixed salad and fries, and surly waiters are part of the experience.

Defensa 855, Buenos Aires, C1065AAO, Argentina
11-4307–2489
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Mon. 7 pm–1 am; Tues.–Sun. noon–1 am, Closed Mon. lunch

El Estanciero

$$$ | Las Cañitas

This steak house perfectly captures the vibrancy of Las Cañitas—even on weekdays, when you can see couples and groups heading in the door as late as midnight. They come for the juicy cuts of beef and flavorful achuras (organ meats), all of which are grilled over an open fire by a professional staff. Grab one of the tables on the open second floor and you'll get an even better view of the parrilla and the action outside. Ask for your favorite steak vuelta y vuelta (extra rare) for best results.

El Federal

$$$ | Retiro

An homage to the rugged terrain of the Argentine wilds, every surface in this downtown eatery seems to be rough wood or tanned leather. Chef Paula Comparatore turns out modern twists on classic regional dishes, often making use of rarely seen ingredients. Her tehuelches, a type of Patagonian empanada named after a near-extinct southern tribe, are among the best in the city, and her classic slow braises of lamb, goat, and beef are simply divine. For those with something lighter in mind, there are indigenous fish preparations and even a vegetarian dish or two.

El Globo

$$$ | Centro

Much like the neighborhood in which it resides, El Globo is touristy but good. Hearty pucheros (mixed boiled meat dinners), roast suckling pig, squid, and other Spanish-Argentine fare are served in a large dining area, as they have been since the restaurant opened in 1908. The cazuela de mariscos (seafood stew) is another specialty.

El Imparcial

$$$ | Centro

This is the city's oldest restaurant, dating back to the 1860s. The name, which translates as "impartial," was meant to offer up neutral territory for various Spanish and Basque factions that emigrated to the city during the mid-19th century. The menu is a mix of local Argentine fare and classic Spanish dishes. You're not necessarily going to be wowed by anything, but you're also never going to be disappointed. The paella and other rice dishes, particularly those with seafood, are the way to go. At lunchtime there's a three-course prix-fixe menu that comes in at less than the price of an à la carte appetizer. Don't miss the natilla madrileña (custard with caramel) for dessert.

El Obrero

$$$ | La Boca

Big, juicy steaks that are perfectly cooked, massive helpings of side dishes, and more ambience than you can shake a stick at make El Obrero a movie director's dream of an Argentine steak house. The neighborhood is iffy, particularly at night—take a taxi to and from (they'll call one for you).

Augustín R. Caffarena 64, Buenos Aires, 1157, Argentina
11-4362–9912
Known For
  • Authentic-style canteen
  • Abundant portions
  • Friendly service
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Closed Sun., No credit cards

El Palacio de la Papa Frita

$$$ | Centro
Av. Corrientes 1612, Buenos Aires, 1042, Argentina
11-4374–8063

El Palacio de la Papa Frita

$$ | Centro

No frills doesn't mean no charm at this longtime porteño favorite. Steaks, pastas, and salads are the draw, but don't miss the papas soufflés, meaning puffed-up french fries. If you want to go full-tilt local style, order them à la provençal and they'll arrive at your table tossed with minced garlic and parsley. After all, this place and the other three branches around town (Palermo, Recoleta, and another in Centro) aren't called the Palace of the French Fry for no reason.

Lavalle 735, Buenos Aires, 1047, Argentina
11-4393–4849
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Credit cards accepted

El Preferido de Palermo

$$ | Palermo Viejo

Though it was recently overhauled by the Parrilla Don Julio team, much care has been taken to retain El Preferido de Palermo's authentic and traditional character. Order a plate of cold cuts–the charcuterie cellar is on display—and savor them at the kitchen counter. 

Jorge L. Borges 2108, Buenos Aires, C1425FFD, Argentina
11-4774–6585
Known For
  • Award-winning restaurant
  • Updated blast from the past
  • Delicious classic Argentine dishes for sharing

El Trapiche

$$$ | Palermo Hollywood

This eatery's design aesthetic—a bare, unadorned space illuminated with industrial lighting—doesn't translate to the dishes, which, while not fancy, include hearty portions of grilled and fried Argentine dishes and a smattering of Spanish specialties. At lunch it's packed with Palermo office workers, and at dinner there's a mix of locals and tourists, all tucking into the well-seasoned and properly cooked steaks and chops. Don't miss the boquerones (marinated anchovies) as an appetizer. The entraña, or hanger steak, particularly when accompanied by the excellent papas a la crema (creamed potatoes), are a don't-miss main course perfect for sharing. While the menu might look pricey at first glance, most of the steaks easily serve more than one person. There are also inexpensive prix-fixe lunch options.

Paraguay 5099, Buenos Aires, 1425, Argentina
11-4772–7343
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Credit cards accepted

Elena Restaurante

$$$$ | Recoleta

With a new name and a new chef, the Four Seasons Hotel's spectacularly renovated dining room serves creative fare that blends the traditions of Argentina with touches of the sunny Mediterranean. Don't miss the spectacular sweetbread and poached egg appetizer, and for a true taste of what the chef can do off the grill, order the parrillada (a sampler of various cuts of meat) or the mariscada, (a medley of grilled seafood), both in portions big enough for up to four people to share. If you're in a more casual mood, the Pony Line bar offers fantastic cocktails, great pizzas, and one of the best burgers in town. Weekend afternoons you help yourself to a brunch spread that's unrivaled in the city. A children's menu is available.

Filo

$$ | Retiro

Crowded and lively, particularly at lunch, Filo is the place for pasta and wood-oven pizza in the downtown area. The Neapolitan-style pies with thin, charred crusts are among the best in the city. For a real treat, order the Filo, a wheel of a pizza with each slice a different topping according to the pizzero's whims. Pastas are served perfectly al dente—a rarity in town—and come with both classic and creative sauces.

Florencio

Barrio Norte

The cheesecake. Wait, the caramelized pear tart. No, the immense chocolate cake. Whichever you choose at this tiny café on a lane a couple blocks north of Recoleta Cemetery, expect near-perfection. Salads, savory pies, and sandwiches round out the offerings.

Pasaje Francisco de Vittoria 2363, Buenos Aires, C1425ENA, Argentina
11-4807–6477
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: Mon., Tues., Thurs., and Sat. 9–8, Wed. and Fri. 9 am–8 pm and 9 pm–midnight

Gran Bar Danzón

$$ | Retiro

The city's longest established cocktail and wine bar is a dimly lit lounge that attracts the local wine-geek set as well as hard liquor aficionados. They serve some of the best lounge food in town, including great sushi (don't miss the crispy prawn rolls), appetizers such as ceviche, and a great selection of wines by the glass. Note that it's a two-story climb up steep stairs to get here.

Libertad 1161, Buenos Aires, 1061, Argentina
11-4811–1108
Known For
  • Loungey ambience
  • Great wine list
  • Attracts a cool crowd
Restaurant Details
Rate Includes: No lunch, Reservations essential

Green Bamboo

$$$ | Palermo Hollywood

Covered with more knick-knacks than the space comfortably allows, the bar at the city's only Vietnamese restaurant looks like someone bought out a souvenir shop. The barstools are irrelevant, because there's no place to set your drink anyway. But that's fine, because you can just grab a table or relax on a sofa in the dining area and enjoy one of the signature cocktails while you peruse the menu of Vietnamese classics. Perennial favorites include the crispy smoked eggplant dumplings, prawns with rice pasta, chicken curry, and five-spice spareribs. Bowing to local custom, there's little heat in any of the dishes, even if you ask for extra chilies, but ask for a bowl of Sriracha hot sauce to be brought to your table.