26 Best Hotels in County Clare, Galway, and the Aran Islands, Ireland

Aran Camping and Glamping

$$ | Frenchman's Beach, Aran Islands, Ireland Fodor's Choice

Aran's glamping units, or clocháns, are igloo shaped (inspired by monks' medieval beehive huts that made a guest appearance in Star Wars: The Last Jedi) and fully heated, with en suite and cooking facilities. They're perched right on the beach in Kilronan---alongside larger, conventionally shaped tigíns (good old-fashioned camping facilities) for €10 a night. Best part for those seeking a quiet getaway experience is that bachelorette and bachelor parties are not welcome.

Pros

  • Unique units
  • Atmospheric setting on beach
  • Heated, with cooking facilities

Cons

  • No Wi-Fi
  • Groups discouraged
  • No TV
Frenchman's Beach, Aran Islands, Ireland
086-189--5823
hotel Details
9 units
Rate Includes: No Meals

Quick Facts

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Ard Einne Guesthouse

$ | Cill Ronáin [Kilronan], Ireland

The rambling 80-year-old house on Inishmore, with its distinctive dormer windows, is close to both the beach and the town; many guests base themselves here for two or three nights, to make a thorough exploration of the island. Almost every window at this B&B looks out to the sea, making it the perfect place to de-stress. The public rooms and guest rooms are relaxed, with modern decor including light-color linens and walls paneled with blond wood.

Pros

  • Excellent breakfast included
  • Near the airport
  • Warm, friendly hosts

Cons

  • One of the island's biggest guesthouses
  • No elevator
  • A walk from the island's main hub
Cill Ronáin [Kilronan], Ireland
099-61126
hotel Details
8 rooms
Rate Includes: Closed Nov.–Jan., Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Ballinalacken Castle Hotel

$$ | Coast Rd., Doolin, Ireland

Not actually a castle, Ballinalacken is rather a mustard-color Victorian lodge in the shadow of medieval tower-house ruins, a few miles from Doolin Village. Its hilly setting, back from the road in a 100-acre wildflower meadow, offers panoramic coastal views and enough distance from Doolin's busy nightlife to guarantee a peaceful night's sleep. Large bow-shaped windows draw in light and lift the darker shades inside the public areas, which are decorated with natural oak and drapes. Guest rooms in the older house have massive four-poster beds, marble fireplaces, and high ceilings. Some large, sunny rooms have bay windows to frame that stunning view; nice but plainer rooms in the new wing, with antique-style decor, are equally sought after. The restaurant has an imaginative and sophisticated continental menu with the best of locally sourced food, from Lisdoonvarna's smokehouse to St. Tola's cheese.

Pros

  • Beautiful grounds for walking
  • Peaceful setting
  • Warm, old-fashioned welcome from the O'Callaghan family

Cons

  • Not in fact a castle
  • Remote
  • Limited amenities
Coast Rd., Doolin, Ireland
065-707--4025
hotel Details
10 rooms, 2 suites
Rate Includes: Closed Nov.–mid-Apr. No dinner Tues., Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Bunratty Castle Hotel

$ | Bunratty West, Bunratty, V95 DW9N, Ireland

This 144-room quality property is one of the few full-facilities hotels in the region, with a gym, spa, and the same in-room facilities you would expect from a quality-brand hotel. Its location is hard to match---on an elevated site overlooking Bunratty Castle and Folk Park, just off the N18 and close to public transport. 

Pros

  • Small pool and gym
  • On-site parking
  • Excellent buffet breakfast

Cons

  • Generic design
  • Can be busy with weddings and tours
  • Some rooms overlook a local graveyard
Bunratty West, Bunratty, V95 DW9N, Ireland
061-478--700
hotel Details
144 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Carrygerry Country House

$$ | Shannon, Newmarket on Fergus, Ireland

Modest and gabled, this 1793 country house is 12 km (7 miles) and 8 km (5 miles) from Shannon Airport and is also a world apart, with views across the plains where horses calmly graze, as they have done for centuries, to the distant Shannon Estuary. It's a popular first- and last-night stopover with transatlantic passengers: you can see the airport's control tower, but you would never know the airport was so close, and you are not on the flight path. Owners Niall and Gillian Ennis have decorated the lounge and bar with a homey assortment of Victorian antiques and hunting prints, and books of local interest, with an open fire in the bar. The six bedrooms in the main house are the most elegant, some with four-poster beds, all with modest antiques. Simpler, less expensive rooms in the converted stables also have plenty of character. Most guests opt to watch the sensational sunsets from the award-winning Conservatory Restaurant, popular with Clare locals. 

Pros

  • Real Irish character
  • Abundant wildlife, birdsong, peace and quiet
  • Excellent restaurant

Cons

  • Tricky to find
  • No other facilities in the immediate area
  • Bar menu only some nights
Shannon, Newmarket on Fergus, Ireland
061-360–500
hotel Details
11 rooms
Rate Includes: Call to confirm dinner Sun.–Tues. (bar menu only when quiet), Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Dromoland Castle Hotel

$$$$ | Newmarket on Fergus, V95 ATD3, Ireland Fodor's Choice
Courtesy of Dromoland Castle Hotel and Country Estate

With structures that date back to the 11th and 16th centuries, and now one of Ireland's grandest hotels, Dromoland Castle's picture-perfect setting and lavish finishes offer a classic fairy-tale feel but with modern comforts. Public spaces are richly decorated with velvet and hardwood furniture and fittings in traditional heritage hues of green, yellow, and crimson; curtains, carpets, chairs, couches, and timber walls capture the essence of an important period home. The large hearth is the focal point for guests who lounge in its glow, while sparkling crystal chandeliers illuminate ancestral portraits. The bedrooms, on the other hand, tell three different stories spanning as many centuries. Much of the recent refurbishment costs have been lavished here, with the addition of luxurious en suite bathrooms and upgrades to bedroom decor, soundproofing, and air-conditioning. Accommodations in the original 19th-century castle cleverly integrate heritage style with modern flair: spacious rooms feature scaled-back Baroque patterns in soothing tones and fresh linen covers on the four-poster beds. Dromoland's Queen Anne section contains the hotel's fully refurbished standard rooms housed in quadrangle-shape 18th-century stables, with all rooms facing an internal courtyard. While the rooms are comparatively modest in size, they are furnished to the same high standard. The final bedroom section is a 20th-century expansion that lies farthest from reception. For dining, the Fig Tree Restaurant in the golf clubhouse offers a casual fireside option, while the Earl of Thomond Restaurant is the place for a chandeliered European feast. Afternoon tea is popular with locals; book ahead. The hotel offers a stunning golf course, tennis, fishing, spa, falconry, and woodlands perfect for jogging and cycling.

Take a stroll through the castle's arched hedge to its ornate garden and note the ancient stone entrance. It was taken from the family's earlier palace on the outskirts of the Burren, Lemanagh Castle.

Pros

  • Old-fashioned luxury with modern amenities
  • High standard of service
  • Beautiful grounds

Cons

  • In part, the grounds double as a golf course
  • Some Queen Anne–section bedrooms have small windows facing a courtyard
  • Lake-view rooms are in high demand and difficult to reserve
Newmarket on Fergus, V95 ATD3, Ireland
061-368–144
hotel Details
98 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

Drumcreehy Country House

$ | Bishop's Quarter, Ballyvaughan, Ireland

The pretty gabled facade with dormer windows is traditional in style, but, in fact, Bernadette Moloney and her German husband, Armin Grefkes, designed and built this house specifically as a B&B. It's across the road from the sea, about 2 km (1 mile) north of the village, close to Bishop's Quarter Beach. The interior has character and style, thanks to a mix of imposing 19th-century German antiques, stripped-pine floors, and comfortable sofas and armchairs. Each guest room is individually styled on a wildflower theme, with plain walls, color-coordinated quilts and curtains, brass bedsteads, and attractive small antiques. The delicious breakfast menu offers an unusually wide choice, while the hosts are knowledgeable about the area, and have a good supply of books and maps. 

Pros

  • Big bedrooms for a B&B
  • Nice waterfront location
  • Peaceful nights

Cons

  • A long (1-mile-plus) walk down a narrow busy road to village
  • Some communal spaces are small
  • Standard design
Bishop's Quarter, Ballyvaughan, Ireland
065-707–7377
hotel Details
12 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Gregans Castle Hotel

$$$$ | Ballyvaughan, Ireland

Miles from the nearest town, this handsome ivy-clad Georgian retreat lies in the heart of the Burren, its turf fires and antique furnishings a draw back to a simpler time. Nobel Prize--winner Seamus Heaney and author J. R. R. Tolkien have both stayed here. Fine dining is a cutting-edge experience with a daily tasting menu using organic produce. The balance of tradition and modern design is also reflected here: modern art is offset by antiques. Guest rooms are bright, airy, and uncluttered; choose either a magical view of stony hills and sparkling sea or a ground-floor room with private patio garden.

Pros

  • Tea and fresh-baked scones available all day
  • Beautiful gardens to wander
  • Warm and attentive staff

Cons

  • TV-free zone, only one in-house
  • Often minimum two-night stay
  • Very remote, car essential
Ballyvaughan, Ireland
065-707–7005
hotel Details
15 rooms, 6 suites
Rate Includes: Closed Dec. 2–mid-Feb., Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

Hotel Inisheer

$ | Inis Oirr, Ireland

A basic low-rise in the middle of the island's only village, a few minutes' walk from the quay and the airstrip, this simple whitewashed building with a slate roof and tile flooring has bright, plainly furnished rooms, with pine-frame beds, pine floors, and white bed linen. The social life of the island centers on "the hotel," and there are trad sessions nightly. Larger rooms upstairs can accommodate families.

Pros

  • Very clean
  • Good location between pier and airstrip
  • Friendly staff and attentive owners

Cons

  • Basic standard of comfort (certainly no frills)
  • Restaurant can get very busy with day visitors
  • Noise from the pub
Inis Oirr, Ireland
099-75020
hotel Details
14 rooms
Rate Includes: Closed Oct.–Mar., Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Hyland's Burren Hotel

$$ | Ballyvaughan, Ireland

A turf fire greets you in the lobby of this unpretentious coaching inn, in the heart of the Burren, which dates from the early 18th century and has become a cheerful, welcoming spot with a reputation for friendliness and good entertainment. The much-expanded village-center hotel has guest rooms that vary in size and shape but all have modern pine furniture and color-coordinated drapes and spreads. Ask for a room overlooking the Burren, and check out the amazingly clear night sky. The bar hosts live music most nights from June to mid-September and on Sundays the rest of the year. 

Pros

  • Central location
  • Spacious lounge on the first floor, with an outdoor deck
  • Special midweek rates

Cons

  • Won't win any style contests
  • No leisure facilities
  • Bar and restaurant very busy July and August
Ballyvaughan, Ireland
065-707–7037
hotel Details
32 rooms
Rate Includes: Closed Jan., Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Inis Meáin Restaurant and Suites

$$$$ | Aran Islands, Ireland Fodor's Choice

A remote, luxurious restaurant--hotel with sweeping sea views and a minimalist interior, Inis Meáin Restaurant and Suites offers a unique, modern-monastic retreat in a stunning, low-lying stone-and-glass building that blends with the stonescape of the island. Marie-Thérèse and Ruairí de Blacam's five much-in-demand suites are free of all modern distractions such as TVs or other electronics, featuring a simple, natural blend of stone, wood, and wool and a private terrace so that the focus is directed outward to the exceptional sea and island views, and indirectly inward, as quiet reflection and contemplation is unavoidable in such a private setting. A packed lunch (with homemade soup in a thermos) along with the Inis Meáin Exploration Kit in each suite---island-customized bicycles, binoculars, baited fishing rod, ash walking sticks, beach towels, maps, guides---facilitate exploration of the island.

Pros

  • Excellent restaurant has a cult following
  • Exquisite views
  • Private and peaceful

Cons

  • Off-the-grid feel not for everyone
  • Two-night minimum stay
  • Books up far in advance and no waitlist
Aran Islands, Ireland
086-826--6026
hotel Details
4 rooms, 1 suite apartment
Rate Includes: Closed Oct.--late Mar., Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

Jurys Inn Galway

$ | Galway City, Ireland

Expect good-quality budget accommodations at this four-story hotel set beside the historic Spanish Arch and the river. Each room is big enough for three adults, or two adults and two children, and the rates are the same regardless of how many guests stay in each unit. The light, airy rooms have modern pine fittings, plain carpets and walls, double-glaze windows, and fully equipped bathrooms. Those overlooking the river are quieter than those in front. The atmosphere runs toward anonymous international, but the inn is central—at the foot of Galway's busy Quay Street, right on the bank of the Corrib—and the level of comfort is high for the price (note that rates shoot up at peak times, such as during the Galway Races).

Pros

  • Reliable Irish budget hotel chain
  • Public car park adjacent to hotel offers discounted rates of €10 per 24 hours
  • Great location for pubs, clubs, and river views

Cons

  • Rates subject to demand, so book early
  • Pared-back comfort
  • Favorite for large bachelor/bachelorette parties
Galway City, Ireland
091-566–444
hotel Details
130 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Kilmurvey House

$ | Cill Ronáin [Kilronan], Ireland

This rambling 200-year-old stone farmhouse, once the family home of the O'Flahertys—one of whom was Oscar Wilde's godfather—whose descendants include the famed writers Liam and Robert, is the first choice of many visitors to the island thanks to its location at the foot of Dún Aengus fort, a three-minute walk from the beach, and about 6½ km (4 miles) from the quay and the airport (accessible by minibus). The old stone house has been cleverly extended to provide extra guest rooms. The neatly kept front garden leads to a large, high-ceiling hall and wide stairs, giving a pleasant sense of space. The walls are hung with portraits of the house's previous owners, the warrior clan of O'Flaherty. Guest rooms are spacious and comfortable, with views of the fort or distant sea views. It's worth paying a small supplement for one of the four larger rooms with king-size beds.

Pros

  • Lovely warm welcome
  • Courtesy minibus to and from restaurants
  • Memorable location adjacent to historic fort

Cons

  • Too far to walk to village
  • Public minibus costs €5 each way
  • No elevator
Cill Ronáin [Kilronan], Ireland
099-61218
hotel Details
12 rooms
Rate Includes: Closed mid-Oct.–Mar., Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Lakeside Hotel and Leisure Centre

$ | Ballina, Killaloe, Ireland

The trip across the Shannon on the one-way lane bridge is worth it for this stunningly appointed property with full-on lake views back over the town's historic 13-arch bridge. Rooms have a traditional finish and food is of a quality standard. The leisure center with its 18-meter pool and swirling side appeals to family travelers. The property also has a fully equipped gym.  

Pros

  • Spacious rooms
  • Warm and attentive staff
  • Plenty of space for kids to play outside

Cons

  • Some rooms need an upgrade
  • Popular with weddings
  • Architecturally bland
Ballina, Killaloe, Ireland
061-376--122
hotel Details
43 rooms
Rate Includes: Closed Dec. 21--27, No Meals

Quick Facts

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Loop Head Lightkeeper’s House

$$$$ | Ireland

With 300 degrees of coastal views and little else but ocean between this retreat and New York, Loop Head Lighthouse is the place to rewind and charge batteries. In keeping with its past, the house is simply furnished with white Shaker furniture, timber flooring, and traditional brass beds. The house can accommodate five people.

Pros

  • Wood-burning stove in the living room
  • Incredibly romantic location
  • Privacy

Cons

  • No water-main supply, so guests should bring bottled water for drinking
  • Cliff-side location requires supervision for kids
  • Two-night minimum stay
hotel Details
3 rooms
Rate Includes: Closed Jan., No Meals

Quick Facts

Moy House

$$$ | Miltown Malbay Rd., Lahinch, Ireland Fodor's Choice
Moy House, Lahinch
Enter photo credit

Built for Sir Augustine Fitzgerald, this enchanting, 18th-century Italianate-style lodge sits amid 15 private acres on an exhilarating, Wuthering Heights–like windswept cliff top that's a three-minute drive from Lahinch. It's a world away from the bustling seaside resort—a peaceful haven, where you are made to feel like you're a guest in a privately owned country house. The use of Liscannor stone is at odds with the velvet sofas, marble fireplaces, and gilt-frame paintings, but the building comes into its own once the ocean comes into the frame, particularly in the dining room. Upstairs, brocade curtains and Oriental rugs complement the guest rooms' Georgian and Victorian polished-mahogany antiques. Some rooms have open fires, some have freestanding cast-iron bathtubs, six have stunning sea views, and two overlook the pretty, sheltered garden. Once you settle in, enjoy a drink at the honesty bar in the elegant drawing room (help yourself, and write it down); in bad weather, curl up with a book in the peaceful library. Staying in one of the six rooms with a view is a worthy splurge. The farm-to-fork dining room is open to nonguests and offers a tasting menu from Tuesday to Saturday, when diners can devour the bay views.

Pros

  • Romantic cliff-top location
  • Ocean views
  • Dining room with tasting menu

Cons

  • Outside town
  • The entrance is on a busy narrow road, walk beyond with caution
  • Lack of leisure facilities
Miltown Malbay Rd., Lahinch, Ireland
065-708–2800
hotel Details
9 rooms
Rate Includes: Closed Nov.–Mar., Credit cards accepted, Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

Old Ground Hotel

$$ | O'Connell St., Ennis, Ireland

Understated modern bedrooms and a cornerstone location on O'Connell Street, right in the town center, is the key to the enduring success of this 18th-century ivy-clad landmark hotel. Old-fashioned charm meets contemporary élan at this winning entry to Ennis's hotel stakes—rest on the lobby's inviting brocade sofas as you study paintings on the wall from the hotel's striking collection of new Irish artists, including Donald Teskey, Cecil Maguire, and Mick O'Dea. In contrast to the period furnishings of the public rooms, guest rooms have an uncluttered but sophisticated style, with furniture painted in soothing shades of taupe or eau de Nil, crisp white linen, and spacious bathrooms. For dinner, go formal with a four-course menu in the Brendan O'Regan Room, or enjoy a casual meal in the hotel's Town Hall Bistro, one of the finest restaurants in town—roast rack of Clare lamb with rosemary ratatouille, perhaps. Then adjourn to the Poet's Corner pub, which, set on Ennis's main street, is the very heart of the town's social life, with award-winning live Irish music sessions most nights.

Pros

  • Friendly and attentive staff
  • Nespresso machines in rooms
  • Offers great breakfasts

Cons

  • Some rooms could do with updating
  • Finding parking can be a challenge
  • No leisure facilities
O'Connell St., Ennis, Ireland
065-682–8127
hotel Details
83 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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Park House Hotel

$$$$ | Galway City, Ireland

Even though this is a large, luxury hotel in central Galway, snazzily converted from a 200-year-old warehouse, it feels like a home away from home, thanks to attentive owner-managers. From the porter who organizes the valet parking of your car to the friendly reception and bar staff, everyone seems to want to help. The Park House actually only reveals its origins in its exterior; inside, a modern wing has been cleverly incorporated. Furnished with sofas and coffee tables, the lobby area is a quiet rendezvous for morning coffee. The lively bar has a big local clientele, and serves food until 9:30 pm; there is also a large formal restaurant. Guest room windows are triple-glazed—in some cases twice (against the noise of late-night revelers). The very quietest ones overlook an interior roof garden. The fanciest have high ceilings and antiques, combined with striking modern prints in warm colors. All are spacious, with good-quality Art Deco–style furniture, and have generous-size bathrooms.

Pros

  • Friendly, professional staff
  • On-site parking
  • A haven of quiet

Cons

  • Tricky to find vehicle entrance first time
  • Limited parking spaces
  • No leisure facilities
Galway City, Ireland
091-564–924
hotel Details
84 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

Sea Breeze Lodge Bed and Breakfast

$$$$ | 9 Cashelmara, Galway City, Ireland

Not your typical West of Ireland bolt-hole, this B&B has the elegance of a luxurious, small, boutique hotel with the charm and warm welcome of a B&B. The walnut flooring, large modern en suites, and marble-floor conservatory where breakfast is served are all divine, but pale in comparison to the magnificent views over Galway Bay. It's tucked into a Salt Hill residential area close to a golf club, away from Galway's heady nightlife, so a good night's sleep is guaranteed.

Pros

  • Great attention to detail from staff
  • Truly wonderful breakfasts
  • Walking distance to downtown

Cons

  • Not in the city center
  • Walk to pubs and restaurants
  • Two-night minimum stay required
9 Cashelmara, Galway City, Ireland
091-529--581
hotel Details
6 rooms
Rate Includes: Closed Nov.--mid-Mar., Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

Stella Maris Hotel

$$$ | O'Connell St., Kilkee, Ireland

If a town the size and scale of Kilkee can have a grande dame property, then the Stella Maris is the place; it's a handsome, charming little hotel close to the sea, with a contemporary country style. It has served the town well ever since it was constructed back in 1853 as a coast-guard regional headquarters so expect to see some old-timers lingering in the lobby or lounge. Now spruced up with a mix of plaid and impressionist art, the Stella Maris also offers excellent views and close proximity to Kilkee's horseshoe-shape beach.

Pros

  • Friendly and accommodating staff
  • Tasty breakfast options
  • Excellent on-site restaurant

Cons

  • Lack of street parking
  • In a busy part of the town
  • Few leisure facilities on-site
O'Connell St., Kilkee, Ireland
065-905--6455
hotel Details
12 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

The Abbey Tavern

$ | Quin Rd., Ennis, Ireland

The five basic rooms with all modern facilities have the edge on other properties because of their location and view directly onto Quin Abbey. Downstairs is the village tavern---contemporary, hearty fare with a lively pub. The building was the original meeting place for locals with a shop, haberdashery and pub, so expect timber beams, shifts in floor elevation, and low ceilings.   

Pros

  • Best food and drink option in town
  • Traditional architecture
  • Friendly, warm staff

Cons

  • Have to use street parking
  • Can be loud
  • Basic rooms
Quin Rd., Ennis, Ireland
065-682--5525
hotel Details
5 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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The Dean Hotel

$$$ | 80 Prospect Hill, Galway City, H91 T9C4, Ireland

Following its cool and cutting-edge brothers in Dublin and Cork, the Dean has added a splash of design to drab Prospect Hill, offering state-of-the-art facilities and trendy dining to the West. The 100 bedrooms offer quality bedding, rainfall power showers, Netflix-enabled smart TVs, Marshall Amps and retro record players, along with Brooks toiletries. The popular Elephant and Castle Restaurant from Temple Bar in Dublin makes an appearance along with Sophies Rooftop Restaurant, a bar and restaurant with city views. The Dean is in the city center.

Pros

  • Close to Eyre Square
  • Excellent facilities, including a gym
  • Outdoor heated pool

Cons

  • No on-site parking.
  • Little of Galway is reflected in the design
  • Food options are all modern dining
80 Prospect Hill, Galway City, H91 T9C4, Ireland
01-223--4517
hotel Details
100 rooms
Rate Includes: No Meals

Quick Facts

The G Hotel

$$$$ | Galway City, Ireland

G is for "glamour"—or for "good grief" (depending on your taste for over-the-top decor)—at this flamboyant player at the top end of Galway's hotel scene, whose architects worked with star hat designer Philip Treacy (a native of Galway) to create an interior that is every bit as fanciful as Treacy's hats. The G Hotel's industrial architecture and setting in a large-scale strip mall on the edge of the city is as incongruous as its bold colors (think purple, black, and pink) etched into west of Ireland motifs, but guests still swarm to savor the views over Lough Atalia. Its five-star facilities appeal to the weekend getaway brigade in search of a stylish retreat close to Galway City. A major draw is the mood layout of the reception lounge areas, which are partitioned with a quiet reflection area (or for catching up on work), which is partially separated from afternoon-tea chatter. Beyond the glam veneer is friendly Irish hospitality from reception on up. Bedrooms offer a clean-lined retreat from the deep-purple public areas.

Pros

  • Spa is the best pampering spot in the city
  • Super accommodating and friendly staff
  • Excellent restaurant

Cons

  • Walk from city center
  • Setting appears almost industrial
  • Style may not appeal to everyone
Galway City, Ireland
091-865–200
hotel Details
101 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

The Hardiman

$$ | Eyre Sq., Galway City, Ireland

Galway's grande-dame hotel (formerly Hotel Meyrick) was built to accommodate train passengers to the heart of Galway in the middle of the 19th century, but even after an expensive makeover, the hotel has managed to retain its Victorian character and restrained opulence with black-and-white-checkered tiles, sash windows, solid oak fixtures, and crystal chandeliers. The upstairs corridors are still wide enough to cater to the wide-hooped dresses worn by its earliest guests. Smaller "carriage rooms," at a reduced rate, are good for single guests. The gaslight brasserie and Oyster Bar are a welcome addition to Galway's evening scene.

Pros

  • Fantastic on-site dining
  • Location on Eyre Square
  • Rooftop hot tub

Cons

  • Not all bedrooms have a/c
  • Architecturally lacking and reflects little of the city
  • Limited parking
Eyre Sq., Galway City, Ireland
091-564--041
hotel Details
103 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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The House Hotel

$$$ | Spanish Parade, Galway City, Ireland

Sheltered from noise on a one-way street with views overlooking the River Corrib, the House Hotel is arguably Galway's best-appointed property, just a stone's throw from the best of the city's vibrant restaurant and pub scene and a two-minute walk from the Quays. The intimate boutique style has endured even with a change of ownership in 2017, and rooms are contemporary and smart, with modern en suites and sharp linen. The reception area is a small, popular meeting place with a trendy bar.

Pros

  • Excellent city-center location
  • River views
  • Serves a decadent afternoon tea

Cons

  • Remote car parking
  • Hotel location open to the elements
  • No fitness facilities
Spanish Parade, Galway City, Ireland
091-538--900
hotel Details
40 rooms
Rate Includes: Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

The Merriman Hotel

$ | Main St., Kinvara, Ireland

Don't let its traditional cottage looks deceive you: this whitewashed, thatched inn on the shores of Galway Bay is, in fact, a midsize hotel, decorated with locally made, well-designed furniture, and original crafts, paintings, and sculpture. Guest rooms are medium-size with smallish, cottage-style windows at head height, and modern pine furniture; small paintings of local scenes provide the principal color. Request a room to the rear of the property for Galway Bay views.

Pros

  • Village center location
  • Free and secure car parking
  • Good restaurant

Cons

  • Bar gets very busy on weekends
  • Small windows in bedrooms
Main St., Kinvara, Ireland
091-638–222
hotel Details
32 rooms
Rate Includes: Closed Jan.–Mar., Credit cards accepted, Free Breakfast

Quick Facts

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