4 Best Sights in Krems, Day Trips from Vienna

Landesgalerie Niederösterreich

Fodor's choice

When it opened in 2019, the Landesgalerie instantly became the most eye-catching building in Krems. Well, its gracefully swooping, tent-like, zinc-tiled and glass-dotted roof isn't exactly easy to ignore. Step inside and things get even more interesting, with its 3,000 square meters of exhibition space dedicated to visual artworks from the last two centuries. Visitors can enjoy prints, paintings, photographs, sculptures, and installations from renowned Lower Austrian artists including Leo Navratil and Christa Hauer-Fruhmann. The on-site Restaurant Poldi Fitzka is well worth a visit, too.

Museumplatz 1, Krems, A-3500, Austria
02732-908010
Sights Details
Rate Includes: €12; Combined ticket with Kunsthalle and Landesgalerie: €18, Closed Mon.

Karikaturmuseum

In 2016, Austrians grieved the death of artist and caricaturist Manfred Deix, whose world-famous works are housed here ("Deixfiguren" became so popular that the word was added to the German dictionary). More than 250 works from the 20th century to the present can also be viewed here, including a large collection of English-language political satire and caricature.

Museumsplatz 3, Krems, A-3500, Austria
02732-908010
Sights Details
Rate Includes: €12; Combined ticket with Kunsthalle and Landesgalerie: €18

Kunsthalle Krems

An old tobacco factory is now a showcase for quirky and contemporary art by both known and unknown artists from the 19th to 21st centuries. Notable examples include Martha Jungwirth and Gregor Schmoll. Tickets include entry to the Dominikanerkirche in the Old Town, which often holds Kunsthalle exhibitions focusing on current artists from around the world.

Museumsplatz 5, Krems, A-3500, Austria
02732-908010
Sights Details
Rate Includes: €12; Combined ticket with Karikaturmuseum and Landesgalerie: €18, Closed Mon.

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Steinertor

The sole survivor of the original four 15th-century city gates—the rest of them were razed in the late 1800s, along with the city wall—Steiner Tor remains one of the most recognizable symbols of Krems. A plaque on one side reveals its three major stages of development—construction in 1480 (on the orders of Holy Roman Emperor Friedrich III), a Baroque refurb in 1754 (under the reign of Maria Theresa), and a significant renovation in the 1950s—while the other side has coats of arms and other decorative adornments. Look out also for the memorial to a catastrophic ice flood in January 1573.