Bermuda

We’ve compiled the best of the best in Bermuda - browse our top choices for the top things to see or do during your stay.

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  • 1. Admiralty House Park

    The park, site of the extravagant, now mostly demolished, home of a former admiral of the British Navy, has man-made caves to explore and trails with views of the north shore, but it's also notable as the perfect spot to attempt a favorite pastime of locals: cliff jumping. The cliffs are about 15–20 feet high, and the water below is deep and clear. Wear good water shoes, as the walk back up the cliffs can be a bit rocky. If you're less thrill seeker and more of a sun seeker, there's a small beach to relax off a calm cove and lagoonlike water to wade in.

    68 Spanish Point Rd.
  • 2. Bermuda Botanical Gardens

    Established in 1898, the Botanical Gardens are filled with exotic subtropical plants, flowers, and trees. The 36-acre property features a miniature forest, an aviary, a hibiscus garden with more than 150 species, and collections of orchids, cacti, fruits, and ferns. In addition to these must-see sights is an intriguing must-smell one: the Garden for the Sightless. Designed primarily for the visually impaired, it has fragrant plants like geraniums, lemons, lavender, and spices, plus Braille signage. 

    169 South Rd.
    - 441 - 236–5902

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 3. Bermuda Craft Market

    Inside this former barrel-making factory, you can find the Bermuda Craft Market—arguably the island's largest and best-priced crafts outlet. It showcases the wares of more than 60 craftspeople, including quilters, candlemakers, toymakers, and wood carvers. Also in the building is the Bermuda Arts Centre, a member-run art gallery that displays innovative high-end work in changing exhibits. A half-dozen artists at the Bermuda Arts Centre also maintain studios on the premises, so leave some time to watch them at work.

    4 Maritime La.
    - 441 - 234–3208 - Craft Market

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 4. Bermuda Farmers' Market

    One of the best places to mingle with Onions and, yes, buy a few edible ones is the seasonal Bermuda Farmers' Market, held every Saturday from 8 am to 1 pm, featuring up to 30 vendors who sell only Bermuda-grown, -caught, or -made products. Along with organic produce and assorted home-baked items, goodies like handcrafted soaps and honey derived from the pollen of island wildflowers are for sale.

    169 South Rd.
    - 441 - 599–3276

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Closed Sun.–Fri. July–mid-Nov.
  • 5. Bermuda National Gallery

    Home to Bermuda's national art collection, the Bermuda National Gallery has permanent exhibits that include paintings by island artists as well as European masters like Gainsborough and Reynolds; African masks and sculpture; and photographs by internationally known artists, such as Bermudian Richard Saunders (1922–87). The fine and decorative art pieces in the collection reflect the country's multicultural heritage. Temporary exhibits are also part of the museum's program, and on any given day you can see a selection of local work along with a traveling exhibit from another museum. The gallery is on the second floor in the City Hall & Arts Centre, in the East Exhibition Room. For a comprehensive look at the collections, arrange a private docent tour. Lectures and other programs are listed in the gallery's online calendar. Some of these are targeted specifically at children, and there is an interactive education space at the gallery entrance.

    17 Church St.
    - 441 - 295–9428

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $5, Closed Sun.– Mon.
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  • 6. Bermuda National Gallery

    Museum/Gallery

    Home to Bermuda's national art collection, the Bermuda National Gallery has permanent exhibits that include paintings by island artists as well as European masters like Gainsborough and Reynolds; African masks and sculpture; and photographs by internationally known artists, such as Bermudian Richard Saunders (1922–87). The fine and decorative art pieces in the collection reflect the country's multicultural heritage. Temporary exhibits are also part of the museum's program, and on any given day you can see a selection of local work along with a traveling exhibit from another museum. The gallery is on the second floor in the City Hall & Arts Centre, in the East Exhibition Room. For a comprehensive look at the collections, join one of the free docent-led tours offered Thursday at 10 am (private ones can be arranged on request). Lectures and other programs are listed in the gallery's online calendar. Some of these are targeted specifically at children, and there is an interactive education space at the gallery entrance.

    City Hall & Arts Centre, 17 Church St., 2nd fl., Hamilton, Pembroke Parish, HM 11, Bermuda
    441-295–9428

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $5, Closed Sun.
  • 7. Bermuda Underwater Exploration Institute

    The 40,000-square-foot Ocean Discovery Centre at the institute showcases local contributions to oceanographic research and undersea discovery. Highlights include the world-class shell collection amassed by resident Jack Lightbourn (three of the 1,000 species were identified by and named for Lightbourn himself) and a gallery honoring native-born archaeologist Teddy Tucker featuring booty from Bermudian shipwrecks. The equipment that made such discoveries possible is displayed, including a replica of the bathysphere William Beebe and Otis Barton used in their record-smashing 1934 dive. (Forget the Bermuda Triangle: the real mystery is how they descended a half mile in a metal ball less than 5 feet in diameter!) A more modern "submersible," Nautilus-X2, lets wannabe explorers take a simulated seven-minute trip to the ocean floor. Special events, like lectures, glowworm cruises, and whale-watching trips, are available for an added fee. The on-site Harbourfront restaurant is a lovely choice for lunch. Pedestrians may access the facility by following the sidewalk on the water side of Front Street. Motorists must drive out of town on Front Street, round the traffic circle, and exit at the lane signposted for the BUEI.

    40 Crow La.
    - 441 - 292–7219

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $15, Closed Mon.
  • 8. Clocktower Mall

    A pair of 100-foot towers makes it impossible to miss the Clocktower Mall, where the 19th-century building that held the Royal Navy's administrative offices now is home to distinctly Bermudian boutiques—including specialty shops and branches of Front Street favorites. Observant folks will note that one tower features a standard clock, the other a tide indicator. The shops are particularly popular on Sunday because most stores outside the Dockyard area are closed.

    6 Clock Tower Parade
    - 441 - 234–1709

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 9. Fort Hamilton

    This imposing, moat-ringed fortress has underground passageways that were cut through solid rock by Royal Engineers in the 1860s. Built to defend the West End's Royal Naval Dockyard from land attacks, it was outdated even before its completion, but remains a fine example of a polygonal Victorian fort. Even if you're not a big fan of military history, the hilltop site's stellar views and stunning gardens make the trip worthwhile. On Monday at noon, from November to March, bagpipes echo through the grounds as the kilt-clad members of the Bermuda Islands Pipe Band perform a traditional skirling ceremony. Due to one-way streets, getting to the fort by scooter can be a bit challenging. From downtown Hamilton head north on Queen Street, turn right on Church Street, then turn left to go up the hill on King Street. Make a sharp (270-degree) right turn onto Happy Valley Road and follow the signs. Pedestrians may walk along Front Street to King Street.

    Happy Valley Rd., Pembroke, HM 20, Bermuda
    441-292–1234

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 10. Horseshoe Bay

    When locals say they're going to "the beach," they're generally referring to Horseshoe Bay, the island's most popular. With clear water, a 0.3-mile (0.5-km) crescent of pink sand, a vibrant social scene, and the uncluttered backdrop of South Shore Park, Horseshoe Bay has everything you could ask of a Bermudian beach.  The Annual Bermuda Sand Castle Competition also takes place here. The undertow can be strong, especially on the main beach. A better place for children is Horseshoe Baby Beach, at the western end of Horseshoe Bay. Sheltered from the ocean by a ring of rocks, this cove is shallow and almost perfectly calm. In summer, toddlers can find lots of playmates. Amenities: lifeguards; parking (free); showers; toilets. Best for: partiers; swimming; walking.

    Off South Shore Rd., Southampton, SN 08, Bermuda

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 11. Masterworks Museum of Bermuda Art

    The theme of the island's first purpose-built state-of-the-art museum (2008), like that of its former incarnation (the Masterworks Foundation), is "Bermuda Through the Eyes of Artists," and the soaring main gallery is devoted to island-inspired works by internationally renowned figures such as Georgia O'Keeffe, Andrew Wyeth, and Winslow Homer. Two other galleries display (and sell) paintings by native-born artists. The museum is on the grounds of the Bermuda Botanical Gardens and is also home to Homer's Cafe.

    183 South Rd.
    - 441 - 299–4000

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $10, Closed Sun. but call to check
  • 12. National Museum of Bermuda

    Ensconced in Bermuda's largest fort, the museum displays its collections of maritime and historical artifacts in old munitions warehouses that surround the parade grounds and Keep Pond at the Dockyard. Insulated from the rest of the Dockyard by a moat and massive stone ramparts, it is entered by way of a drawbridge. At the Shifting House, right inside the entrance, rooms hold relics from some of the 350-odd ships wrecked on the island's reefs. Other buildings are devoted to seafaring pursuits such as whaling, shipbuilding, and yacht racing. More displays are in the 19th-century Commissioner's House, on the museum's upper grounds. Built as both home and headquarters for the Dockyard commissioner, the house served as a World War I barracks and was used for military intelligence during World War II. Today it contains exhibits on Bermuda's social and military history. A must-see is the Hall of History, a mural of Bermuda's history covering 1,000 square feet. Painting it took local artist Graham Foster more than 3½ years. You'll also want to photograph the sheep that graze outside the building, mowing the grass. Mind your feet! They're very good at their work.

    Maritime La., Sandys, MA 01, Bermuda
    441-234–1418

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $15; includes admission to Dolphin Quest Bermuda
  • 13. Royal Naval Dockyard

    Once a military stronghold that played a role in conflicts from the War of 1812 to World War II, the restored buildings of the sprawling Royal Naval Dockyard offer a full day of history with plenty of shopping and dining, and some adventure as well. The centerpiece is the National Museum of Bermuda, with exhibits on local maritime history and more in an imposing stone fortress; it has stunning ocean views from its highest points. The Old Cooperage holds the Bermuda Craft Market and the Bermuda Arts Centre; you can also shop in the Clocktower Mall, in another historic building. Dolphin Quest, an interactive experience, and Snorkel Park Beach are other diversions. The Dockyard has plenty of places to eat, such as British pub fare and locally brewed beer at the Frog & Onion, or a quick latte and flaky baked goods at the Dockyard Pastry Shop. Note that a cruise terminal is on King's Wharf, making this a busy spot.

    5 Freeport Dr.
  • 14. Somerset Village

    Its position on Mangrove Bay once made it a popular hideout for pirates, but judging by Somerset Village's bucolic appearance, you'd never guess that now. The shady past has been erased by shady trees, quiet streets, and charming cottages. As far as actual attractions go, this quaint one-road retreat has only a few eateries and shops—most of them offshoots of Hamilton stores. Nevertheless, it provides easy access to Springfield and the Gilbert Nature Reserve (29 Somerset Rd. ), a 5-acre woodland with paths that connect to some of the most scenic portions of Bermuda's Railway Trail.

  • 15. Southlands Park

    Statuesque banyan trees line the road beyond the gates of Southlands Estate in this sprawling, 37-acre park with rambling gardens and crumbling limestone buildings. Ownership of the estate has changed hands many times since the 1700s, when it was maintained by the ministers of Warwick Parish's Christ Church. Open to the public as a park since 2013, it's an ideal place to explore Bermuda's natural beauty. The winding paths eventually lead you to quiet, secluded Marley Beach along the south shore.

    Southlands Rd.

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 16. Albuoy's Point

    For a ringside seat to the show of sailboats and passenger ferries zigzagging around the many islands that dot Hamilton Harbour, grab a bench beneath the trees at Albuoy's Point, a small waterside park. Nearby is the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club, founded in 1844 and granted the use of the term Royal by Prince Albert in 1845. Today, luminaries from the international sailing scene hobnob with local yacht owners and business executives at the club's 1930s headquarters. If you're around between April and November, you might even catch one of the many club-sponsored racing events.

  • 17. Astwood Cove and Park

    On weekends you can often find lots of children and families at this small yet popular beach. The Astwood Park area is shady and grassy, with a great view of the ocean, making it popular among locals for birthday parties, picnics, and weddings. Though accessible via one of Bermuda's main roads, it's quite secluded; the few benches scattered around the area are a great vantage point to share a romantic evening. If you're bringing kids, watch out for the steep climb from the park down to the beach area. Amenities: parking (free). Best for: solitude; swimming.

    49 South Shore Rd.

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 18. Bailey's Ice Cream

    If you've got kids in tow—or are driving a scooter—you may want to skip the rum and stick to Bailey's—Bailey's Ice Cream, that is. The popular parlor, directly across from the Swizzle Inn, dishes up some two dozen flavors of homemade all-natural ice creams, plus low-fat frozen yogurts and fat-free sorbets. This store accepts cash only.

    2 Blue Hole Hill
    - 441 - 293–8605
  • 19. Bermuda Arboretum

    Established with specimens delivered to the island from the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, sent by Queen Elizabeth II, the 22-acre parkland features Bermudian cedar trees, flowing golden acacias, rare rubber trees, and black ebony and avocado trees. Its winding trails and grassy meadows are popular for walking, hiking, and picnicking. The area is also an established bird-watching sanctuary, where you can hope to catch a glimpse of feathered species like cardinals, rare bluebirds, white-eyed vireos, and kiskadees.

    Montpellier Rd.

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 20. Bermuda Customs

    It's illegal to export shipwreck artifacts or a Bermuda-cedar carving or item of furniture that's more than 50 years old without a special permit from Bermuda Customs.

    40 Front St.
    - 441 - 295–4816

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