Singapore

We’ve compiled the best of the best in Singapore - browse our top choices for the top things to see or do during your stay.

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  • 1. Asian Civilisations Museum

    CBD | Museum/Gallery

    Empress Place Building was constructed in the 1860s as a courthouse and this huge, white, neoclassical building has housed nearly every government...

    Empress Place Building was constructed in the 1860s as a courthouse and this huge, white, neoclassical building has housed nearly every government body, including the Registry of Births and Deaths and the Immigration Department. It's now home to the Asian Civilisations Museum, the nation's first to look comprehensively at the east, south, southeast, and west Asian regions. With 11 galleries spread over three levels, each of the regions has its own thematic timeline and permanent displays. The galleries have state-of-the-art interactive features, and there's an educational center for kids.

    1 Empress Pl., Singapore, Central Singapore, 179555, Singapore
    -6332–7798

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: S$5
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  • 2. Gardens by the Bay

    CBD | Garden

    The government-funded, large-scale gardens next to Marina Bay Sands opened with much well-deserved pomp in 2012. Highlights include a futuristic...

    The government-funded, large-scale gardens next to Marina Bay Sands opened with much well-deserved pomp in 2012. Highlights include a futuristic grove of "Supertrees"—giant vertical gardens—and two armadillo-shaped conservatories. The Flower Dome is home to plants from the Mediterranean and subtropical regions, while the Cloud Forest is veiled in mist and houses the world's largest indoor waterfall. The OCBC Skyway is a 420 foot (128 m) walkway that connects several of the Supertrees and offers a great view from above. While fees apply for both the Skyway and conservatories, visitors can wander around the Gardens until 2 am free of charge.

    18 Marina Gardens Dr, Singapore, Central Singapore, 018953, Singapore
    -6420–6848
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  • 3. MacRitchie Reservoir

    Clementi | City Park

    This 30-acre park has a jogging track with exercise areas, a playground, and a kiosk. The path around the reservoir is peaceful, with only the...

    This 30-acre park has a jogging track with exercise areas, a playground, and a kiosk. The path around the reservoir is peaceful, with only the warbling of birds and chatter of monkeys to break your reverie.From the TreeTop Walk, a 250-meter suspension bridge that connects the two highest points in the park, you can get above the tall trees and look out onto the city.

    Lornie Rd., near Thomson Rd., Singapore, Central Singapore, Singapore
    1800-471–7300

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 4. Marina Bay Sands

    CBD | Arts/Performance Venue

    One of the newest, as well as most iconic, parts of the Singapore skyline, Marina Bay Sands opened in 2010—it includes the biggest hotel in...

    One of the newest, as well as most iconic, parts of the Singapore skyline, Marina Bay Sands opened in 2010—it includes the biggest hotel in Singapore; The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands, a glitzy mall filled with top fashion brands and its own casino; celebrity-chef restaurants, and a theater often presenting Broadway shows. There's also the SkyPark, an observation deck that's 660 feet (200 m)high.

    1 Bayfront Ave., Singapore, Central Singapore, 018972, Singapore
    -6688–8868
  • 5. Night Safari

    Clementi | Zoo/Aquarium

    Right next to the Singapore Zoo, the safari is the world's first wildlife park designed exclusively and especially for night viewing. Here 80...

    Right next to the Singapore Zoo, the safari is the world's first wildlife park designed exclusively and especially for night viewing. Here 80 acres of secondary jungle provide a home to over 2,500 animals that are more active at night than during the day. Some 90% of tropical animals are, in fact, nocturnal, and to see them do something other than snooze gives their behavior a new dimension. Night Safari uses a moat concept to create open, natural habitats; areas are floodlighted with enough light to see the animals' colors but not enough to limit their normal activity. You're taken on a 45-minute tram ride along 3 km (2 mi) of road, stopping frequently to admire the beasts (some of which, like deer and tapirs, can get quite close to the tram) and their antics. On another kilometer or so of walking trails you can observe some of the small cat families, such as the fishing cat; primates, such as the slow loris and the tarsier; and the pangolin (scaly anteater). Larger animals include the Nepalese rhino, the beautifully marked royal Bengal tigers, babirusa (pig deer with curled tusks that protrude through the upper lip), and wild mountain goats and sheep.

    80 Mandai Lake Rd., Singapore, Central Singapore, 729826, Singapore
    -6269–3411

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: S$35
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  • 6. Peranakan Museum

    Bras Basah | Museum/Gallery

    Formerly the Tao Nan School, built in 1910, this grand colonial building now houses the first museum in Southeast Asia devoted to the story...

    Formerly the Tao Nan School, built in 1910, this grand colonial building now houses the first museum in Southeast Asia devoted to the story of the Peranakans, the descendants of 17th-century Chinese and Indian immigrants who married local Malays. Its ten galleries display artwork, jewelery, furniture, and clothing from members of the community.

    39 Armenian St., Singapore, Central Singapore, 179941, Singapore
    -6332–3015

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: S$6
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  • 7. Pulau Ubin

    Forest

    Take a 10-minute ride on a bumboat (a small launch) from Changi Point Ferry Terminal to reach this boomerang-shape island. Here amid kelongs...

    Take a 10-minute ride on a bumboat (a small launch) from Changi Point Ferry Terminal to reach this boomerang-shape island. Here amid kelongs (fishing huts), the life of the islands roughly 50 residents hasn't changed much in 30 years. The name derives from the Malay word for granite, zubin. The best way to see this island is on bicycle, which can be rented on the island for around S$10. There are three trails that lead past old plantations, mangrove swamps, forests, and the occasional wild boar. Small, scruffy seafood restaurants on the island serve fresh coconuts and Chinese dishes.

    Sentosa Island, South West, Singapore
  • 8. River Safari

    Clementi | Zoo/Aquarium

    Located between the Singapore Zoo and Night Safari, the latest addition to Singapore's portfolio of wildlife parks is inspired by eight of the...

    Located between the Singapore Zoo and Night Safari, the latest addition to Singapore's portfolio of wildlife parks is inspired by eight of the world's most iconic rivers. In addition to Kai Kai and Jia, Singapore's resident pandas, the park is home to the world's largest collection of freshwater fauna, a squirrel monkey forest, and several theme restaurants.

    80 Mandai Lake Rd, Singapore, Central Singapore, 729826, Singapore
    65-6269–3411

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $35
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  • 9. S.E.A. Aquarium

    Zoo/Aquarium

    This underwater wonderland, one the world's largest aquariums, provides views of creatures from around the world. Gaze into a shipwreck habitat...

    This underwater wonderland, one the world's largest aquariums, provides views of creatures from around the world. Gaze into a shipwreck habitat; walk through a tunnel surrounded by various shark species; and gape at goliath groupers, Napoleon wrasses, and a squadron of magnificent manta rays.

    Resorts World, 8 Sentosa Gateway, Sentosa Island, South West, 098269, Singapore
    65-6577–8888

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $29
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  • 10. Science Centre Singapore

    Educational Institution

    Aviation, nuclear science, robotics, astronomy, space technology, and Internet technology are entertainingly explored through audiovisual and...

    Aviation, nuclear science, robotics, astronomy, space technology, and Internet technology are entertainingly explored through audiovisual and interactive exhibits housed in the 14 galleries here. You can walk into a "human body" for a closer look at vital organs, or test yourself via computer quiz games. You'll also find the Omni Theatre, where movies and planetarium shows are screened. Kids can discover some intriguing facts about water, while cooling off at the WaterWorks exhibition out front.

    15 Science Centre Rd., Jurong Town, South West, 609081, Singapore
    -6425–2500

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: S$12, including Omni Theatre
  • 11. Singapore Botanic Gardens

    Botanic Gardens | Garden

    The gardens were begun in 1859 and carry the hallmarks of Victorian garden design—gazebos, pavilions, and ornate bandstands included. This is...

    The gardens were begun in 1859 and carry the hallmarks of Victorian garden design—gazebos, pavilions, and ornate bandstands included. This is still one of the world's great centers of botanical scholarship, attracting international scientists to its herbarium and library; the gardens' work on orchid hybridization and commercialization for export was groundbreaking. Botanist Henry Ridley experimented here with rubber-tree seeds from South America; his work led to the development of the region's huge rubber industry and to the decline of the Amazon basin's importance as a source of the commodity.Spread over some 128 acres, the grounds contain a large lake (with black swans from Australia), masses of shrubs and flowers, and magnificent examples of many tree species, including fan palms more than 90 feet high. Don't miss the 10-acre natural remnant rain forest. Locals come here to stroll along nature walks, jog, practice tai chi, feed geese, or just enjoy the serenity. The gardens are trisected into three different zones, each with its own identity and attractions. The ecolake extension at the Bukit Timah side of Cluny Road is a lovely open site with interesting displays of commercial, culinary, and medicinal crops and herbs.

    1 Cluny Rd., Singapore, Central Singapore, 259569, Singapore
    -6471–7361

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
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  • 12. Sri Mariamman Temple

    Chinatown | Religious Building/Site/Shrine

    Singapore's oldest Hindu temple has a pagoda-like entrance topped by one of the most ornate gopurams (pyramidal gateway towers) you're likely...

    Singapore's oldest Hindu temple has a pagoda-like entrance topped by one of the most ornate gopurams (pyramidal gateway towers) you're likely to ever see outside of South India. Hundreds of brightly colored statues of deities and mythical animals line the tiers of this towering porch; glazed concrete cows sit, seemingly in great contentment, atop the surrounding walls. The story of this temple begins with Naraina Pillay, Singapore's first recorded Indian immigrant, who came to Singapore on the same ship as Raffles in 1819 and started work as a clerk. Soon he'd set up his own construction business, often using convicts sent to Singapore from India, and quickly made a fortune. He obtained this site for the temple, so that devotees could pray on the way to and from work at the harbor. The first temple, built in 1827 of wood and attap (wattle and daub), was replaced in 1843 by the current brick structure. The gopuram was added in 1936. Inside are some spectacular paintings that have been restored by Tamil craftsmen brought over from South India. This is where Hindu weddings, as well as the firewalking festival Thimithi takes place. To take photos or video, you'll need to buy tickets ($3 for cameras, $6 for video).

    244 South Bridge Rd., Singapore, Central Singapore, 058793, Singapore
    -6223–4064
  • 13. Sri Srinivasa Perumal Temple

    Little India | Religious Building/Site/Shrine

    Dedicated to Vishnu the Preserver, the temple is easy to recognize by its 60-foot-high monumental gopuram, with tiers of intricate sculptures...

    Dedicated to Vishnu the Preserver, the temple is easy to recognize by its 60-foot-high monumental gopuram, with tiers of intricate sculptures depicting Vishnu in the nine forms in which he has appeared on earth. Especially vivid are the depictions of Vishnu's manifestations as Rama, on his seventh visit, and as Krishna, on his eighth. Sri Srinivasa Perumal is very much a people's temple. Inside you'll find devotees making offerings of fruit to one of the manifestations of Vishnu. This is done either by handing coconuts or bananas, along with a slip of paper with your name on it, to a temple official, who'll chant the appropriate prayers to the deity and place holy ash on your head; or by walking clockwise while praying, coconut in hand, around one of the shrines a certain number of times, then breaking the coconut (a successful break symbolizes that Vishnu has been receptive to the incantation). Dress conservatively, and be ready to take off your shoes before you enter.

    397 Serangoon Rd., Singapore, Central Singapore, 218123, Singapore
    -6298–5771
  • 14. Sultan Mosque

    Kampong Glam | Religious Building/Site/Shrine

    The first mosque on this site was built in the early 1820s with a S$3,000 grant from the East India Company. The current structure, built in...

    The first mosque on this site was built in the early 1820s with a S$3,000 grant from the East India Company. The current structure, built in 1928 by Denis Santry of Swan & Maclaren—the architect who designed the Victoria Memorial Hall—is a dramatic building with golden domes and minarets that glisten in the sun. The walls of the vast prayer hall are adorned with green and gold mosaic tiles on which passages from the Koran are written in Arabic. The main dome has an odd architectural feature: hundreds of brown bottles, stacked five or more rows deep, are jammed in neck first between the dome and base. No one knows why. Five times a day—at dawn, 12:30, 4, sunset, and 8:15—the sound of the muezzin, or crier, calls the faithful to prayer. At midday on Friday, the Islamic Sabbath, seemingly every Malay in Singapore enters through one of the Sultan Mosque's 14 portals to recite the Koran. During Ramadan, the month of fasting, the nearby streets, especially Bussorah, and the square in front of mosque are lined with hundreds of stalls selling curries, cakes, and candy; at dusk Muslims break their day's fast in this square. Non-Muslims, too, come to enjoy the rich array of Muslim foods and the party atmosphere. The best view of the Sultan Mosque is at the junction of Bussorah Street and Beach Road.

    3 Muscat St., Singapore, Central Singapore, 198833, Singapore
    -6293–4405
  • 15. The Arts House

    CBD | Government Building

    George Coleman designed the Parliament House in 1827 as a mansion for wealthy merchant John Maxwell. Maxwell never occupied it, and instead...

    George Coleman designed the Parliament House in 1827 as a mansion for wealthy merchant John Maxwell. Maxwell never occupied it, and instead leased it to the government, which eventually bought it in 1841 for S$15,600. It was the Supreme Court until 1939 and is considered Singapore's oldest government building. In 1953 it became the home of the then governing Legislative Assembly and then the meeting place for Parliament in 1965. The bronze elephant statue on a plinth in front was a gift from King Chulalongkorn of Siam during his state visit in 1871. The building now houses The Arts House performance space. Film retrospectives, photo exhibitions, musicals, plays, and talks by experts are regular events.

    1 Old Parliament Lane, (Corner of High St. and St. Andrew's Rd.), Singapore, Central Singapore, 179429, Singapore
    -6332–6900

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 16. Thian Hock Keng Temple

    Chinatown | Religious Building/Site/Shrine

    This structure—the Temple of Heavenly Happiness—was completed in 1842 to replace a simple shrine built 20 years earlier. It's one of Singapore...

    This structure—the Temple of Heavenly Happiness—was completed in 1842 to replace a simple shrine built 20 years earlier. It's one of Singapore's oldest and largest Chinese temples, built on the spot where, prior to land reclamation, immigrants stepped ashore after a hazardous journey across the China Sea. In gratitude for their safe passage, the Hokkien people dedicated the temple to Ma Chu P'oh, the goddess of the sea. It's richly decorated with gilded carvings, sculptures, tile roofs topped with dragons, and fine carved-stone pillars. On either side of the entrance are two stone lions. The one on the left is female and holds a cup symbolizing fertility; the other, a male, holds a ball, a symbol of wealth. If the temple is open, note that as you enter, you must step over a high threshold board. This serves a dual function. First, it forces devotees to look downward, as they should when entering the temple. Second, it keeps out wandering ghosts—ghosts tend to shuffle their feet, so if they try to enter, the threshold board will trip them.Inside, a statue of a maternal Ma Chu P'oh surrounded by masses of burning incense and candles dominates the room. On either side of her are the deities of health (on your left) and wealth. The two tall figures you'll notice are her sentinels: one can see for 1,000 miles; the other can hear for 1,000 miles. The gluey black substance on their lips—placed there by devotees in days past—is opium, meant to heighten their senses. Although the main temple is Taoist, the temple at the back is Buddhist and dedicated to Kuan Yin, the goddess of mercy. Her many arms represent how she reaches out to all those who suffer on earth.

    158 Telok Ayer St., Singapore, Central Singapore, 068613, Singapore
    -6423–4616
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  • 17. Tiger Sky Tower

    Observatory

    Take a comfortable ride up this 361-foot (110-m) tower for stunning views of Sentosa and Singapore's Southern Islands. Formally known as the...

    Take a comfortable ride up this 361-foot (110-m) tower for stunning views of Sentosa and Singapore's Southern Islands. Formally known as the Carlsberg Sky Tower, it is Asia's tallest free standing observation tower; a ride takes approximately seven minutes.

    Adjacent to the Sentosa cable car station, Sentosa Island, South West, Singapore

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: S$15
  • 18. Abdul Gaffoor Mosque

    Little India | Religious Building/Site/Shrine

    This mosque was completed in 1910 and has recently been restored. Though it has none of the exotic, multicolor statuary of the Hindu temples...

    This mosque was completed in 1910 and has recently been restored. Though it has none of the exotic, multicolor statuary of the Hindu temples, it still woos you with an intricately detailed facade in the Muslim colors of green and gold. When entering, make sure your legs are covered to the ankles, and remember to take off your shoes. Only worshipers are allowed into the prayer hall. Out of respect you shouldn't enter during evening prayer sessions or at any time on Friday.

    41 Dunlop St., Singapore, Central Singapore, 209369, Singapore
    65-6295–4209

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 19. Al-Abrar Mosque

    Chinatown | Religious Building/Site/Shrine

    In 1827 when the original thatch hut stood here, it was one of Singapore's first mosques for its Indian Muslims. Also known as Kuchu Palli ...

    In 1827 when the original thatch hut stood here, it was one of Singapore's first mosques for its Indian Muslims. Also known as Kuchu Palli (Tamil for "mosque hut"), the existing structure dates from 1850. Though much of the mosque's original ornamentation has been replaced, its original timber panels and fanlight windows have remained.

    192 Telok Ayer St., Singapore, Central Singapore, 068635, Singapore
  • 20. Arab Street

    Kampong Glam | Neighborhood/Street

    On this street of specialty shops, you'll find baskets of every description—stacked on the floor or suspended from the ceiling. Farther along...

    On this street of specialty shops, you'll find baskets of every description—stacked on the floor or suspended from the ceiling. Farther along, the road is dominated by shops that sell fabrics: batiks, embroidered table linens, rich silks, and velvets.

    Arab Street, Singapore, Central Singapore, Singapore
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