Singapore

We’ve compiled the best of the best in Singapore - browse our top choices for the top things to see or do during your stay.

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  • 1. Buddha Tooth Relic Temple

    Chinatown

    Beautiful by day but especially lovely by night, Chinatown’s most iconic landmark is tiered in ornate red and gold, the design inspired by the Buddhist...

    Beautiful by day but especially lovely by night, Chinatown’s most iconic landmark is tiered in ornate red and gold, the design inspired by the Buddhist mandala, a symbol of Buddhist culture that represents the universe. The temple takes its name from what’s thought to be the left canine tooth of the Buddha, recovered from his funeral pyre in India and displayed inside the temple grounds.

    228 South Bridge Rd., Singapore, Singapore, 058840, Singapore
    6220--0220

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 2. Changi International Airport

    Changi

    Singapore’s slick airport hasn’t just won multiple awards for World’s Best Airport—it’s also been named one of the world’s most outstanding retail real-estate projects. And...

    Singapore’s slick airport hasn’t just won multiple awards for World’s Best Airport—it’s also been named one of the world’s most outstanding retail real-estate projects. And it's no wonder: The sprawling four-terminal complex houses hundreds of stores and restaurants, many of which can’t be found elsewhere. If shopping and eating—the country’s most popular pastimes—aren’t your thing, there are plenty of other draws, like the Butterfly Garden, a Canopy Park (where you can walk across bouncy nets suspended across the top floor), and the Rain Vortex, a seven-story (and the world's tallest) indoor waterfall.

    70 Airport Blvd., Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
    6595–6868
  • 3. Coney Island Park

    Changi

    A lesser-visited gem of a park in the northeast of Singapore, uninhabited Coney Island (aka Pulau Serangoon) boasts hidden white-sand beaches and plenty of mangrove-draped...

    A lesser-visited gem of a park in the northeast of Singapore, uninhabited Coney Island (aka Pulau Serangoon) boasts hidden white-sand beaches and plenty of mangrove-draped trails through coastal forests, casuarina woodlands, and grasslands filled with flora and fauna. Start at Punggol Point Park, where boats and a bridge go to Coney Island Park. There are five main beach areas, and the 2.5-km-long Coney Island Park Connector to explore by bicycle or walking. GoCycling at Punggol Jetty rents bikes for S$10 an hour. On selected Saturday mornings in the months of June, November, and December, National Parks volunteers conduct two-hour guided walks. Amenities: toilets. Best for: solitude; swimming; walking; cycling.

    Pulau Serangoon, Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 4. East Coast Road

    East Coast Park

    One of the earliest delineated thoroughfares in Singapore, East Coast Road is also one of the prettiest, with more than 800 heritage buildings from the...

    One of the earliest delineated thoroughfares in Singapore, East Coast Road is also one of the prettiest, with more than 800 heritage buildings from the early to mid 1900s, a time when the area served as a seaside retreat for the wealthy. Today, a stroll along this spirited enclave will give you a taste of the country’s diverse culture—the stretch is dotted with colorful Peranakan shophouses, museums, and quaint stores, as well as eateries that serve up everything from traditional rice dumplings to Thai mookata and Greek-influenced wood-fired breads.

    East Coast Rd., Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
  • 5. Gardens by the Bay

    Marina Bay

    The government-funded, large-scale gardens next to Marina Bay Sands opened with much well-deserved pomp in 2012. Highlights include a futuristic grove of "Supertrees"—giant vertical gardens—and...

    The government-funded, large-scale gardens next to Marina Bay Sands opened with much well-deserved pomp in 2012. Highlights include a futuristic grove of "Supertrees"—giant vertical gardens—and two armadillo-shaped conservatories. The Flower Dome is home to plants from the Mediterranean and subtropical regions, while the Cloud Forest is veiled in mist and houses the world's largest indoor waterfall. The OCBC Skyway is a 420-foot (128-meter) walkway that connects several of the Supertrees and offers a great view from above. While hefty fees apply for the Skyway, the SuperTree Observatory, and conservatories, visitors can wander around the Gardens until 2 am free of charge.

    18 Marina Gardens Dr., Singapore, Singapore, 018953, Singapore
    6420–6848

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Outdoor gardens free; Skyway S$14; SuperTree Observatory S$14; Cloud Forest and Flower Dome S$53; Floral Fantasy S$20
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  • 6. Indian Heritage Centre

    Little India

    Following the colonization of Singapore in 1819, Indians began to make their way over to Singapore, and today they form the country's third-largest ethnic group....

    Following the colonization of Singapore in 1819, Indians began to make their way over to Singapore, and today they form the country's third-largest ethnic group. Inside the stunning Indian Heritage Centre, the history of the Indian and South Asian communities is detailed through five permanent exhibitions. Other showcases include opulent gold jewelry from the Saigon Chettiars’ Temple Trust, personal heirlooms, and intricately carved doorways and frames, one holding as many as 5,000 carvings. Free guided tours in English, Tamil, and Chinese are offered. Before leaving, take time to admire the building, modeled after a baoli (Indian stepwell)—it's especially eye-catching at sunset.

    5 Campbell La., Singapore, Singapore, 209924, Singapore
    6291–1601

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $8, Closed Mon.
  • 7. ION Sky

    Orchard

    ION Sky offers panoramic views of Singapore from the 56th floor of ION Mall, 718 feet above the ground. It's free to enter, but only...

    ION Sky offers panoramic views of Singapore from the 56th floor of ION Mall, 718 feet above the ground. It's free to enter, but only after spending S$50 in ION Mall (you need to download the ION Orchard app, then scan your receipt to receive your QR ticket). Your admission includes a complimentary welcome drink at 1-Atico Lounge. Alongside the great views are a number of interactive exhibits, including films screened on the glass walls and historic portrayals of how Singapore once looked.

    2 Orchard Turn, Singapore, Singapore, 238801, Singapore
    6238--8228

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free (with S$50 purchase at Ion Mall), Closed Sun. and Mon.
  • 8. Lau Pa Sat

    CBD

    This market is the largest Victorian cast-iron structure left in Southeast Asia. Already a thriving fish market in 1822, it was redesigned as an octagon...

    This market is the largest Victorian cast-iron structure left in Southeast Asia. Already a thriving fish market in 1822, it was redesigned as an octagon by George Coleman in 1834 and again redesigned, as seen today, in 1894. It now serves as a food court, with hawker stalls that are busy during the day with office workers. After 7 pm, Boon Tat Street is closed to traffic, and the mood turns festive: hawkers wheel out their satay carts, and buskers often perform.

    18 Raffles Quay, Singapore, Singapore, 048582, Singapore
    6220–2138
  • 9. Marina Bay Sands

    Marina Bay

    One of the most iconic structures on the Singapore skyline, Marina Bay Sands includes the biggest hotel in Singapore; The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands,...

    One of the most iconic structures on the Singapore skyline, Marina Bay Sands includes the biggest hotel in Singapore; The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands, a glitzy mall filled with top fashion brands and its own casino; celebrity-chef restaurants; and the cavernous Marquee nightclub. Don't miss out on the atelier Louis Vuitton, set on an island accessible via a tunnel, and the state-of-the-art Apple Store Marina Bay Sands, an all-glass dome sphere floating on water and offering 360-degree views of the city's skyline. There's also the SkyPark, an observation deck that's 660 feet (200 meters) high and home to the hotel's much-Instagrammed, 150 meter-long infinity pool—the world's largest outdoor elevated body of water.

    1 Bayfront Ave., Singapore, Singapore, 018972, Singapore
    6688–8868
  • 10. Newton Food Centre

    Orchard

    Also known as Newton Circus, this is one of the best-known hawker centers in town. (The "circus" refers to a roundabout, as in Piccadilly Circus.)...

    Also known as Newton Circus, this is one of the best-known hawker centers in town. (The "circus" refers to a roundabout, as in Piccadilly Circus.) It's a great place to visit at night, when the atmosphere is buzzing, and it's usually very busy no matter which evening you go. Food vendors here often get pushy with their menus, so walk with confidence if you don't want to be accosted. Note that you can sit anywhere: it can feel strange buying food at one stall, then sitting down in front of another, but that's the practice. In fact, it can sometimes be hard to find a table, so grab whatever you can get. The barbecue seafood stalls are famous here, though things like tiger prawns and chilli crab are priced by weight, so have the bill tallied up ahead of time to avoid expensive surprises.

    500 Clemenceau Ave. N, Singapore, Singapore, 229495, Singapore
  • 11. Pulau Ubin

    Pulau Ubin

    Take a 10-minute ride on a bumboat (a small launch) from Changi Point Ferry Terminal to be transported back in time on this boomerang-shaped island....

    Take a 10-minute ride on a bumboat (a small launch) from Changi Point Ferry Terminal to be transported back in time on this boomerang-shaped island. It's best explored by bicycle, which can be rented on the island. There are three trails that lead past old plantations, mangrove swamps, forests, the occasional wild boar, and abandoned granite quarries that look surprisingly picturesque. You should also consider a visit to the Chek Jawa Wetlands, one of Singapore’s richest ecosystems, to wander the 1-km (0.62-mile) boardwalk (Mangrove and Coastal Loops) and take in views from the 66-foot Jejawi Tower. There's also the Ketam Mountain Bike Park, a 10-km (6.2-mile) park around the Ketam Quarry. Before heading back, cool off with a fresh coconut drink or order a kampong-style meal from one of the small seafood restaurants near the jetty.

    Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Boat ride from S$4 per person; bicycle rentals from S$10
  • 12. S.E.A. Aquarium

    Sentosa Island

    One of the world's largest aquariums, this underwater wonderland with seven themed zones provides views of more than 1,000 species from around the world. Gaze...

    One of the world's largest aquariums, this underwater wonderland with seven themed zones provides views of more than 1,000 species from around the world. Gaze into a shipwreck habitat; walk through a tunnel surrounded by various shark species; and gape at goliath groupers, Napoleon wrasses, and a squadron of magnificent manta rays. There are educational shows on dive feeding and understanding dolphin behavior scheduled throughout the day. VIP tours can be organized.

    8 Sentosa Gateway, Singapore, Singapore, 098269, Singapore
    6577–8888

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: S$32
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  • 13. Singapore Botanic Gardens

    Botanic Gardens

    The first site in Singapore to gain UNESCO Heritage status is also the first and only tropical botanic gardens in the world to make the...

    The first site in Singapore to gain UNESCO Heritage status is also the first and only tropical botanic gardens in the world to make the list. Once you start to explore the winding trails of the enormous park, which sprawls across more than 128 acres of lush greenery, you'll understand why. It is neatly segmented into different gardens featuring all the hallmarks of Victorian design—gazebos, pavilions, and ornate bandstands included. Highlights are the National Orchid Garden, showcasing over 1,000 species of brightly colored blooms, and the Ginger Garden, where several hundred varieties of ginger grow. Try to time your visit to coincide with the free guided tours that almost always take place around 9 am on Saturday (see the National Parks website for more details).

    1 Cluny Rd., Singapore, Singapore, 259569, Singapore
    6475–5060-Orchid Garden

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
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  • 14. Sri Mariamman Temple

    Chinatown

    Singapore's oldest Hindu temple has a pagoda-like entrance topped by one of the most ornate gopurams (pyramidal gateway towers) you're likely to ever see outside...

    Singapore's oldest Hindu temple has a pagoda-like entrance topped by one of the most ornate gopurams (pyramidal gateway towers) you're likely to ever see outside of South India. Hundreds of brightly colored statues of deities and mythical animals line the tiers of this towering porch; glazed concrete cows sit, seemingly in great contentment, atop the surrounding walls. The story of this temple begins with Naraina Pillay, Singapore's first recorded Indian immigrant, who arrived on the same ship as Sir Stamford Raffles in 1819 and set up his own construction business, often using convicts sent to Singapore from India, quickly making a fortune. The first temple, built in 1827 of wood and attap (wattle and daub), was replaced in 1843 by the current brick structure. The gopuram was added in 1936. Inside are some spectacular paintings that have been restored by Tamil craftsmen brought over from South India. This is where Hindu weddings, as well as the firewalking festival Thimithi, take place.

    244 South Bridge Rd., Singapore, Singapore, 058793, Singapore
    6223–4064
  • 15. Sri Srinivasa Perumal Temple

    Little India

    Dedicated to Vishnu the Preserver, the temple is easy to recognize by its 60-foot-high monumental gopuram, with tiers of intricate sculptures depicting Vishnu in the...

    Dedicated to Vishnu the Preserver, the temple is easy to recognize by its 60-foot-high monumental gopuram, with tiers of intricate sculptures depicting Vishnu in the nine forms in which he has appeared on Earth. Especially vivid are the depictions of Vishnu's manifestations as Rama, on his seventh visit, and as Krishna, on his eighth. Sri Srinivasa Perumal is very much a people's temple, with services that include Prasadam Offering and Term Archanai. Inside, you'll find devotees making offerings of fruit to one of the manifestations of Vishnu. This is done either by handing coconuts or bananas, along with a slip of paper with your name on it, to a temple official, who'll chant the appropriate prayers to the deity and place holy ash on your head, or by walking clockwise while praying, coconut in hand, around one of the shrines a certain number of times, then breaking the coconut (a successful break symbolizes that Vishnu has been receptive to the incantation). Dress conservatively—shawls can be provided—and be ready to take off your shoes before you enter.

    397 Serangoon Rd., Singapore, Singapore, 218123, Singapore
    6298–5771

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free, Closed Sat.
  • 16. Sultan Mosque

    Kampong Glam

    The first mosque on this site was built in the early 1820s with a S$3,000 grant from the East India Company. The current structure, built...

    The first mosque on this site was built in the early 1820s with a S$3,000 grant from the East India Company. The current structure, built in 1928 by Denis Santry of Swan & Maclaren—the architect who designed the Victoria Memorial Hall—is a dramatic building with golden domes and minarets that glisten in the sun. The walls of the vast prayer hall are adorned with green and gold mosaic tiles on which passages from the Koran are written in Arabic. The main dome has an odd architectural feature: hundreds of bottle ends are jammed in between the dome and base. This unusual feature originated as a way for lower-income Muslims to donate during the mosque's construction so that all could contribute. Five times a day—at dawn, 12:30, 4, sunset, and 8:15—the sound of the muezzin, or crier, calls the faithful to prayer. At midday on Friday, the Islamic Sabbath, Muslims from all over Singapore enter through one of the Sultan Mosque's 14 portals to recite the Koran. During Ramadan, the month of fasting, the nearby streets, especially Bussorah, and the square in front of mosque are lined with hundreds of stalls selling curries, cakes, and candy; at dusk Muslims break their day's fast in this square. Non-Muslims, too, come to enjoy the rich array of Muslim foods and the festive atmosphere. The best view of the Sultan Mosque is at the junction of Bussorah Street and Beach Road. Walk-ins are welcome Saturday through Thursday from 10 am to 12 pm and from 2 pm to 4 pm. 

    3 Muscat St., Singapore, Singapore, 198833, Singapore
    6293–4405

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Closed Sun.
  • 17. Tekka Market

    Little India

    Renovated in 2023, this is one of the city's largest and busiest wet markets (where meat and fish are sold). Tekka also has a staggering...

    Renovated in 2023, this is one of the city's largest and busiest wet markets (where meat and fish are sold). Tekka also has a staggering array of fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices for sale. On the Sungei Road side of the ground floor are stalls selling Chinese, Indian, Malay, and Western foods. Many of the stalls are run by second- or third-generation hawkers, making this an excellent place to sample Singapore's famed hawker food. Upstairs shops sell hardware, shoes, luggage, textiles, and Indian clothing.

    665 Buffalo Rd., Singapore, Singapore, 210665, Singapore
  • 18. Thian Hock Keng Temple

    Chinatown

    This structure was completed in 1842 to replace a simple shrine built 20 years earlier. It's one of Singapore's oldest Chinese temples, built on the...

    This structure was completed in 1842 to replace a simple shrine built 20 years earlier. It's one of Singapore's oldest Chinese temples, built on the spot where, prior to land reclamation, immigrants stepped ashore after a hazardous journey across the China Sea. In gratitude for their safe passage, the Hokkien people dedicated the temple to Ma Chu P'oh, the goddess of the sea. It's richly decorated with gilded carvings, sculptures, tile roofs topped with dragons, and fine carved-stone pillars. On either side of the entrance are two stone lions. The one on the left is female and holds a cup symbolizing fertility; the other, a male, holds a ball, a symbol of wealth. If the temple is open, note that as you enter, you must step over a high threshold board. This serves a dual function. First, it forces devotees to look downward, as they should when entering the temple. Second, it keeps out wandering ghosts—ghosts tend to shuffle their feet, so if they try to enter, the threshold board will trip them. Inside, a statue of a maternal Ma Chu P'oh surrounded by masses of burning incense and candles dominates the room. On either side of her are the deities of health (on your left) and wealth. The two tall figures you'll notice are her sentinels: one can see for 1,000 miles; the other can hear for 1,000 miles. The gluey black substance on their lips—placed there by devotees in days past—is opium, meant to heighten their senses. Although the main temple is Taoist, the temple at the back is Buddhist and dedicated to Kuan Yin, the goddess of mercy. Her many arms represent how she reaches out to all those who suffer on earth. This is a good place to learn your fortune. Choose a number out of the box, then pick up two small stenciled pieces of wood at the back of the altar and let them fall to the ground. If they land showing opposite faces, then the number you have picked is valid. If they land same-side up, try again. From a valid number, the person in the nearby booth will tell you your fate, and whether you like the outcome or not, you pay for the information. Leave the grounds by the alley that runs alongside the main temple. The two statues to the left are the gambling brothers. They will help you choose a lucky number for your next betting session; if you win, you must return and place lighted cigarettes in their hands.

    158 Telok Ayer St., Singapore, Singapore, 068613, Singapore
    6423–4616

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
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  • 19. Universal Studios Singapore

    Sentosa Island

    Packed with cutting-edge rides, shows, and movie-themed attractions, this theme park inside Resorts World Sentosa is a family favorite. Eighteen of the 24 movie-themed rides...

    Packed with cutting-edge rides, shows, and movie-themed attractions, this theme park inside Resorts World Sentosa is a family favorite. Eighteen of the 24 movie-themed rides were designed or adapted especially for the Singapore park, including the world’s first Puss in Boots’ Giant Journey and the dueling Battlestar Galactica: Human vs Cyclone roller-coaster. Spread across seven themed sections, the park has a number of kid-friendly rides and shows, including Shrek 4-D Adventure, Dino-Soarin', and Donkey-Live as well as the Hello Kitty Studio Store and Minion Mart. The five-hour guided VIP tour includes priority access to eight popular rides like TRANSFORMERS The Ride: The Ultimate 3D Battle and photo-ops with characters. Popular dining spots like Mel's Drive-In, Fossil Fuel, and Fairy Godmother's Juice Bar provide fuel for what will be a busy day. 

    8 Sentosa Gateway, Singapore, Singapore, 098269, Singapore

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: S$61
  • 20. Abdul Gaffoor Mosque

    Little India | Religious Building/Site/Shrine

    This mosque was completed in 1910 and has recently been restored. Though it has none of the exotic, multicolor statuary of the Hindu temples...

    This mosque was completed in 1910 and has recently been restored. Though it has none of the exotic, multicolor statuary of the Hindu temples, it still woos you with an intricately detailed facade in the Muslim colors of green and gold. When entering, make sure your legs are covered to the ankles, and remember to take off your shoes. Only worshipers are allowed into the prayer hall. Out of respect you shouldn't enter during evening prayer sessions or at any time on Friday.

    41 Dunlop St., Singapore, Central Singapore, 209369, Singapore
    65-6295–4209

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free

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