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We want to relocate to cooler, non-hurricane climate...

We want to relocate to cooler, non-hurricane climate...

Old Jul 20th, 2005, 10:33 AM
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We want to relocate to cooler, non-hurricane climate...

Hello all--
My wife and I are seriously looking at relocating away from Pensacola, Fl. We are just tired of all the damage and hassles of hurricanes and the Gulf Coast heat and humidity. We would like a city where summers are mild and winters are not snow-bound or frozen over. Some snow and cold are ok. We are currently evaluating the Asheville region of N.C. because of the mild summer weather. I am in the real estate business and plan to continue in that field where ever we go. We know some of the pros and cons of Asheville, but would enjoy hearing what others think. We would also like to hear about other regions and the general idea of packing up and moving on. (We've been here 30+ years.) Looking forward to your comments and input. Thanks!
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 10:57 AM
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Asheville took a wallop from Hurricane Ivan last year. Parts of the Blue Ridge Parkway near Asheville are still closed because of storm washouts.

Freaky occurance, maybe. But hurricanes that come ashore from the Gulf of Mexico have to go somewhere and north is usually the direction.

Other Asheville posters can give you more detailed information than I can.

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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 11:04 AM
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The Seattle area.

-Bill
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 11:11 AM
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pcola--Please get an extra bedroom for us!!! Dave in Fairhope
 
Old Jul 20th, 2005, 11:12 AM
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Hello pcola. I can definitely sympathize with you since we left the area right after Ivan ate our house. I have never regretted leaving - I just can't imagine having to worry about hurricanes six months out of the year. I have been "through" plenty of hurricanes but nothing like Ivan. We're in Texas right now and are delighted just to have a place to live. We are checking out the Pacific NW as a place to settle permanently, particularly Washington state. Moving wasn't really too hard for us cause we weren't that crazy about Florida. We both lived there most of our lives because of family but we are really glad to be experiencing new things. Can't help you with North Carolina as we didn't even consider it but I'm sure you'll get lots of good information here. Best of luck to you!!
 
Old Jul 20th, 2005, 11:13 AM
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I'm somewhat in the same boat -- been in Florida for over 30 years, living either on the east central coast or the west central coast. I am also planning to move within the next 2 years. My criteria are almost the same as yours, except that I want a pretty warm climate and am willing to accept the inland impact of a hurricane as long as I am at least 50-100 miles from a coastal area.

My selections narrowed down to the following:
-Inland central Florida, such as Ocala or Gainesville area.
-The southern half of Georgia, Louisiana (in the hills, not the swamps), Mississippi, or Alabama, in some pleasant small Southern town.
-The area around the South Carolina-Georgia border, along one of the lakes such as Hartwell.

Those places would perhaps also meet your needs, except possibly for the incidence of some hurricane remnants, especially in Florida.

The southeastern states, as you might already know, are full of small towns, some of them very good for an easy-going life. Here are some of the choices I'm considering (remember, I want a smaller town):
-Brookhaven, Hazlehurst, and Yazoo City in Mississippi.
-Marshall, Texas.
-Kentwood and Natchitoches, Louisiana.
-Troy, Florala, and Auburn, Alabama.
-Thomasville, Americus, Cordele, and Tifton, Georgia.
-Greenwood and Aiken, South Carolina.

I'll probably be adding to and deleting from this list as time goes by, but this is my shopping basket for another place to live. Good luck.
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 11:17 AM
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Hi,

Hopefully Scarlett will see this...she is in the process of moving from Jax to Portland, OR. Portland seems to have what you are looking for. Good luck.
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 11:27 AM
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Tax considersations are my concern--you have no income tax --Alabama does. Texas property taxes more than make up for no income tax.
We have been looking at Tyler/Marshall/Henderson Tx but it is hot hot hot there.
 
Old Jul 20th, 2005, 11:46 AM
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Taxes are indeed a big concern and a big reason (other than the HOT summers) we are not buying property in Texas. Oregon has a huge state income tax so that's a consideration too. Not sure about NC but I have used a good website that allows you to compare cost of living, taxes, etc. for cities and states. It's www.realestate.yahoo.com. Another neat site is www.findyourplace.com.
 
Old Jul 20th, 2005, 11:49 AM
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Oops, that's FindYourSpot.com, not Place.
 
Old Jul 20th, 2005, 11:52 AM
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http://www.mytraversecity.com/

Traverse City, it's a wonderful community. There is a great arts and music scene, it is scenically beautiful and there are all sorts of activities!
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 12:13 PM
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I would consider Asheville myself were I at the stage or retirement. Asheville has many of the amenities of a big city while it somehow still maintains its small town feel. It is very 'artsy' & you are still only 5 hours or so from the ocean should the need arise.
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 12:35 PM
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Thanks all for the responses...now, some quick thoughts--
ncgrrl--don't mind the hurricane remnants, just tired of being a target and boarding up, losing power, cable, trees, etc.

stjohnbound & wayne--in addition to getting away from hurricanes, we also want to escape the heat & humidity, which leaves much of the South and Southeast out, except for mountain cities.

Jocelyn_P &rapunzll--The NW is too far from family and the far North is too cold!

Taxes are indeed a consideration. But taxes seem to "even out" somewhat state to state when you factor in all the taxes: gas, sales, property, income, etc. There are exceptions I'm sure and unusually high property or income tax would be an issue.

We don't particularly want a smaller town; a metro area of 100-300k would be ideal.
We'll be making a road trip next month to the Carolinas to take a look and check it all out.
Thanks again everyone...let's keep the thread going.
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 12:46 PM
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Pcola -

Though I understand why you are not interested in the Pacific Northwest (the "far from family" thing is certainly true), just thought I'd let you know that compared to most places in the country, Seattle is far from cold in the winter - even though we are very far north. In fact, Seattle is in the same USDA climate zone as much of the deep south (including the Florida panhandle and most of Louisiana) - see link below. Though Seattle doesn't get anywhere near as warm as those areas in the summer, our MINIMUM (not average) winter lows are about the same. Even in January, AVERAGE nighttime lows in Seattle never drop below freezing.

Seattle has an EXTREMELT mild climate and winter snow is pretty rare (especially in the metro area itself).

Ken

http://mgonline.com/zonemap.html
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 12:55 PM
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Thanks Ken...I think I knew most of that. By far north, I was referring to areas such as Michigan and the northern tier of states. I know there are some very nice areas, but generally they're much too cold for my tastes.
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 12:58 PM
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Pcola -

Yeah, I can relate to that. I spent TWO winters in North Dakota (thought I was gonna DIE!!!!) and three in Michigan (pretty darned cold too - and with a LOT of snow). After those experiences, my dream has been to live in Hawaii.

Ken
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 01:12 PM
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pcola,

My sister- and brother-in-law retired several years ago and, after many years in the Panhandle (Panama City and Fort Walton Beach), retired to Hendersonville, NC, which is close to Ashville.

They have liked it very much, and we enjoy visiting for the cool weather and beautiful mountains nearby.

(But I must report that they had a big oak tree in their kitchen during the "remnants" of Hurricane Opal.)

Byrd
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 01:16 PM
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Wow! You voice exactly what I've been saying for years! Thought I was the only one! I live in Houston (born here) and still hate the heat & humidity. Been through two BIG hurricanes here and maybe one more. Hate the heat & no seasons are worse! Waiting for son to go to college & somehow to get released from parents "shawdow" & responsibility in near future...Don't want to know how old I am-50's-now I know why they call it "middle" age! Someday...hopefully!How about Raleigh, N.C.-quality of life really good & real estate-I am a broker myself-just all the testing to do over! Good luck!
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 01:19 PM
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Spelling goes too!
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Old Jul 20th, 2005, 01:26 PM
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From what you have said in your later post, I believe Tennessee, North Carolina, North Georgia, and Kentucky would be your ideal choices. Get up to a slightly higher altitude and you won't be bothered by the heat or humidity. I would also suggest Hendersonville as one nice destination, along with many other villages even smaller in western N.C. Places like Flat Rock and Saluda are very appealing. In north Georgia, try Ellijay or Chatsworth in the mountains. In Tennessee, there are lots of places; but I would say that if you like a larger town, try Knoxville suburbs or Chattanooga. The hills of southern Kentucky would also be nice.

Somehow I get the idea that you prefer the South. If you don't, I'll come up with some other places that I have frequently visited. Good luck.
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