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Huckleberry Pie in Seattle

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May 28th, 2008, 12:01 PM
  #1
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Huckleberry Pie in Seattle

Where can I find Huckleberry Pie in Seattle?
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May 28th, 2008, 12:12 PM
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I'm not sure we have huckleberries here. I've never heard of that.

How about Marionberry pie? That's more the local specialty.

Suze (in Seattle)
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May 28th, 2008, 12:17 PM
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You might want to call Shoofly (in West Seattle) to see if they carry it (or marionberry) as a seasonal.

www.shooflypiecompany.com
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May 28th, 2008, 12:35 PM
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mms
 
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There are definitely huckleberries around If you don't mind going out of the city, head to the Snohomish Pie Company.
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May 28th, 2008, 12:35 PM
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For those of us who are ignorant(I'm from Wales!) what is a huckleberry? Does it have another name?
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May 28th, 2008, 12:53 PM
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As a child, huckleberry pie was my favorite! FYI:

Huckleberry is a name used in North America for several plants in two closely related genera in the family Ericaceae: Gaylussacia and Vaccinium. The Huckleberry is the state fruit of Idaho.

While some Vaccinium species, such as the Red Huckleberry, are always called huckleberries, other species may be called blueberries or huckleberries depending upon local custom. Usually, the distinction between them is that blueberries have numerous tiny seeds, while huckleberries have 10 larger seeds (making them more difficult to eat).

Note that there is much confusion in naming of berries in American English. The 'garden huckleberry' (Solanum melanocerasum) is not considered to be a true huckleberry but a member of the nightshade family.

The fruit of the various species of plant called huckleberry is generally edible. The berries are small and round, usually less than 5 mm in diameter, and contain 10 relatively large seeds. Berries range in color according to species from bright red, through dark purple, and into the blues. In taste the berries range from tart to sweet, with a flavor similar to that of a blueberry, especially in blue/purple colored varieties. Huckleberries are a favorite of many mammals such as bears and humans.


Bog Huckleberry at Polly's Cove, Nova ScotiaIn the Pacific Northwest of North America, the huckleberry plant can be found in mid-alpine regions, often on the lower slopes of mountains. The plant grows best in damp, acidic soil. Under optimal conditions, huckleberries can be as much as 1.5-2 m (about 5-6.5 feet) high, and usually ripen in mid-to-late summer; later at higher elevations.

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May 28th, 2008, 01:28 PM
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I've eaten huckleberries while hiking in the Cascades, but can't ever remember seeing huckleberry pie on a menu locally. Blackberry or marionberry seems to be a lot more common. But the suggestions to contact those pie companies are good ones.

I'll have to keep an eye out for it this summer--when are you visiting?
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May 28th, 2008, 01:28 PM
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Thank you, I'm now one educated Welsh girl!
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May 28th, 2008, 01:56 PM
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Does no one remember Agent Dale Cooper enjoying Huckleberry Pie in Twin Peaks? Which was primarily filmed in the Washington towns of Snoqualmie and North Bend.
I personally have eaten some in Idaho.
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May 28th, 2008, 02:39 PM
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like NWWanderer... I'm just sayin'

I haven't seen it on any restaurant menu that I can remember.

Marionberry is the more popular local specialty berry.
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May 28th, 2008, 02:45 PM
  #11
mms
 
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Probably because huckleberries tend to be found in the mountains and marionberries in the lowlands, so marionberries are much easier for most people to get to. BTW, almost all marionberries are grown near Salem, OR. I wonder if the name has anything to do with it being Marion County. I always wondered that growing up there.
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Jan 8th, 2014, 07:37 PM
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We have a lot of huckleberries in Washington but since they aren't a cultivated berry like Marionberries they are hard to grow very efficiently. They mostly grow in mountains but you can find some in the lowlands. When you do find them for sale it's because people will go berry picking in wild areas that they grow and then grocery stores and markets etc pay them for their efforts. Then when grocery stores and markets sell them they need to charge a bit to make a profit. You'd see huckleberries for sale more often if they didn't take so much effort and weren't so expensive. This is also why not many places make and sell huckleberry pies. Same thing for other wild berry species like the super delicious Rubinus ursinus or more commonly know as the Pacific Trailing Blackberry.
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Jan 9th, 2014, 12:46 AM
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Former NY Yankee shortstop and long time broadcaster Phil Rizzuto used to call people a huckleberry as a good-natured insult for doing something stupid.
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