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Hello! Relocation Advice Request from someone who hopes to become a regular here.

Hello! Relocation Advice Request from someone who hopes to become a regular here.

Old Aug 25th, 2022, 05:39 PM
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Hello! Relocation Advice Request from someone who hopes to become a regular here.

Hello! I just registered after reading the forums for a few days. Do you know how difficult it is to find a forum that's kind, helpful and active?! I'm grateful I found this one and wanted to let folks know that I don't intend to be ask for help and then disappear. This forum is right up my alley! (Look for me in the cruise forums soon!)

But, right now, I would love your opinions and expertise. I've been researching where I'd like to relocate and retire. I know getting the best help comes from knowing some details first, so please forgive me for what's sure to be a long post!

Me: 56, single, well traveled country kid living in a big Minnesota city, though I've lived in many countries and several states. If I don't get out of Minneapolis soon, I'll go insane. I've been researching my move for the last year in great detail, but nothing beats having fresh eyes and opinions from others.

Likes: Nature, animals/wildlife, hiking, road trips, reading, writing, cooking (recipes from most countries), volunteering, nights in with friends, peace and quiet, cold weather and fireplaces, potlucks, backyard and board games, and living very simply. I've never owned a microwave and I got rid of my TV permanently in the 90's. Admittedly, I'm mostly a major homebody but I'm trying to change that and get out and travel more again. (Road trips and cruises.)

Intense Dislikes: Cities, noise, loud neighbors, college towns, drunks, pollution, motorcycles, sports cars, sports in general, marijuana smoke, Karens, HOAs, Hollywood, art, concerts, cancel culture, social media, and online trolls.

What I'm Looking For
Rural or small town living with plenty of space, quiet, clean water/air, good hiking, plenty of wildlife, a community to get involved in, friendly neighbors, a good church and all four seasons. Basically, the Mayberry/Hallmark quaint town (or rural) fantasy that doesn't exist, but resembles it somewhat. The two types of property I'm interested in are: 1) A quiet neighborhood in town as long as it's peaceful and has good neighbors. And 2) Just outside of town, with acreage, a clean water source, where I can build the house I want. I want to support mom-n-pop businesses, small farmers, and homesteaders to buy fresh fruit and veg, meat, raw cow's milk, eggs, home goods, etc., I'd also like be around two hours away from of stores like Costco, Mills Fleet Farm, Tractor Supply, and a Target. (I don't shop Walmart. Ever.) And decent internet, of course. I know good internet gets sketchy when you get rural. (I think Starlink, once fully released, will solve this problem.)

What I DO NOT Want
Too close to a city or its suburban sprawl where the population growth could soon make my small town or rural area crowded, busy, or noisy. I don't want to be in a college town, a place that's too touristy, where sports are worshipped, marijuana is prevalent, near factories, big agriculture farms or chemical plants. Anywhere that's known for their air pollution, especially the water, is a deal breaker for me. So are HOAs. Personally, as a conservative Christian living in a heavily liberal state (at least in the cities), I need to be around like-minded folks again. (I love all people and believe everyone has the right to believe what they want. I take people for who they are as individuals, not by any "category" they're in.) Lastly, I hate heat and humidity! I've always been a heat wimp. Anything over 74F (23C) and I melt. I also know there's no escaping some of it, even here in Minnesota. The only natural disaster I'm concerned about avoiding is an area that's prone to drought. Water is life. (Firsthand experience talking.)

Things That are NOT FACTORS in my Search
- Family proximity. I don't have any family at all. (I'm still a very happy man though!)
- Finances. No, I'm not wealthy or have unlimited funds! I'm just not going to let money hold me back when considering my final move. Though there is ONE exception: Jackson, Wyoming. Even millionaires are struggling there. Only billionaires can afford it. The hardest part about searching online is that when you type "Best Places to Live in..." it always brings up "The Cheapest Places..." Cheapest doesn't mean best to me. The same search most always means big cities, too, which is NOT best to me. If you type in "Best Small Towns," it still brings up what I consider cities! I want less than 10K and preferably less than 5K population. I'm even okay with a few hundred.

Top States I'm Considering
Most anything in the Appalachia and Blue Ridge Mountain region. East Tennessee, Northwestern North Carolina, West Virginia (though NOT near DC!), Western Virginia and some parts of Pennsylvania.

Secondly, I also like the area around Yellowstone. Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, the Black Hills of South Dakota, parts of Utah. Gorgeous locations but they do have their drawbacks, too.

Northern California. There's a town called Ferndale that's absolutely gorgeous and looks like an old Victorian town.

New Hampshire is beautiful but I think it's too far from the rest of the country for road trips.

States I've Ruled Out Completely
Alaska, Hawaii, Oregon (all I like about Oregon is the nature), Florida, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Southern and Central California, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Illinois, North Dakota, Minnesota, Michigan, Denver area of Colorado, Indiana, Ohio, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maryland, Delaware, New York (though possibly western NY),

Final Notes
I absolutely love West Virginia. (Especially Pocahontas County.) It would be my first choice hands down! The reasons you move to West Virginia are for the people and the nature - in that order. The people there are the best you'll ever find! What makes me hesitate the most isn't the poverty or even the drug problems. It's the infrastructure. Their water is notoriously unhealthy due to mountaintop removal mining, toxic chemical companies (even from over the border in Ohio), and that they're too frequently prone to flooding. Their roads also not maintained well at all. The only reason WV is still a consideration, even after these deal breakers, is literally the people and the nature. They're that incredible!

The only other areas I'm currently, seriously considering are Johnson, Carter and Unicoi Counties in the very upper northeast of TN that border NC. And, respectively, the NC Counties that border the same area of TN - Ashe, Watauga, Avery, etc.,

But, again, based on what I've said here, I want to hear YOUR suggestions and hear YOUR experiences. If any place comes to mind that you think would fit the bill for me, I'd be grateful to hear about it! Online research only gets you so far. And I'm the first to admit that I don't know everything! Especially since I've been living as a hermit for the last 15 years.
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Old Aug 25th, 2022, 07:22 PM
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Welcome to Fodors . . . funnily enough while I was reading along, far northern California came to mind. Ferndale or Fortuna, or more inland - like Mt Shasta/Dunsmuir/Yreka/Weed/McCloud. Mt Shasta would be the most expensive of those 5 but by CA standards still be very economical. Some towns in southern/eastern Oregon could also fit your wish list.

One issue for you could be the the marijuana culture -- pot is a major part of the economy especially in the far NW area of CA. But especially in the Siskiyou County towns I mentioned, the small town/community feel, scenery, outdoor pursuits, 4 distinct seasons but with mostly moderate summers, reasonable access to major shopping and/or medical centers either south in Redding or north in Medford.
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Old Aug 25th, 2022, 07:43 PM
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Wow, you ruled out all or Oregon? Kind of curious why?? I have relatives and friends in the Portland, Corvallis, Eugene area and it is a gorgeous state. It has pretty much everything on your wish list, like peace and quiet, shopping direct from small farmers for meats and produce. Plenty of conservative Christians in that area, if you have a misconception about that.

Vermont also fits your wish list but is actually more liberal in every day ways than Oregon. Don't cross off New Hampshire either (I've lived in both states). I don't understand your comment that it is somehow further away from the rest of the country?? New England states are tiny. You can drive across 3 of them in 3 hours -haha.
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Old Aug 25th, 2022, 08:04 PM
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suze: Pretty much I don't think northern Oregon fits the OPs brief - socially it is very much like the area he is leaving. But demographically, much of southern/southeastern OR is more like far northern/north central CA
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Old Aug 25th, 2022, 08:21 PM
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I spend a lot of time there. It's not all so liberal if that is what you are saying. Pick up trucks with gun racks, chewing tobacco at grocery checkout, plenty of evangelical Christian congregations, conservative politicians and public opinion, etc. Sure yes for more red go "east of the mountains" in either Oregon or Washington state.

New Hampshire (and Vermont in a slightly different way) may be liberal or conservative but mostly they are about minding your own business and doing your own things while you help your neighbor. People of extremely different backgrounds and belief systems pull each others cars out of snowbanks or share firewood in the winter -haha.

But more important... I have a pretty strong impression this person wants to live on the east coast US one of the southern states in the 'bible belt' so to speak. I know they asked for opinions. But their list seems pretty much already heavily-weighted in that direction. Nothing wrong with that. Narrows down the options if they have a particular region in mind to focus on.

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Old Aug 25th, 2022, 10:24 PM
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Hi janisj, thanks very much for reading my "novel!" And thank you for your great reply!

Ferndale, CA is a unique place that all of my research shows to be relatively quiet. I spoke to one man from there and he was really nice and happy to answer my questions. It's not overly touristy, which I like. I actually enjoy meeting tourists and talking to them about their trip and where they're from. And it's not a ski destination bringing tourists by the thousands, which is what I want to avoid! (I wish Ferndale had a bit more of a winter, though.) I also like that they're population only grew by 27 people between the 2010 and 2020 censuses. (From 1,371 to 1,398.) I will definitely research the towns you mentioned in Siskiyou County.

I know marijuana is becoming more accepted but, yes, it's a m.a.s.s.i.v.e turn off for me. There aren't any words strong enough to describe how much I seriously hate it. When someone is smoking it, it's invasive to everyone around the whole block. I can be walking down the street here and someone a block away will be smoking it and the stink is strong everywhere. I just walked home from the grocery store tonight and smelled it. I looked around to see where it was coming from and it was across the street, on the second floor of a house with the window open; 20-somethings smoking and listening to loud music. Again, I'm not one to tell anyone else what to do or not do. I'm not one atom better than anyone else. But the smell of the smoke permeates far and wide and it lingers. It's one of the top things I want to get away from. These days, I just don't know how possible that's going to be unless I somewhere very rural with no nearby neighbors and that's not exactly what I'm looking for either.

Originally Posted by janisj View Post
Welcome to Fodors . . . funnily enough while I was reading along, far northern California came to mind. Ferndale or Fortuna, or more inland - like Mt Shasta/Dunsmuir/Yreka/Weed/McCloud. Mt Shasta would be the most expensive of those 5 but by CA standards still be very economical. Some towns in southern/eastern Oregon could also fit your wish list.

One issue for you could be the the marijuana culture -- pot is a major part of the economy especially in the far NW area of CA. But especially in the Siskiyou County towns I mentioned, the small town/community feel, scenery, outdoor pursuits, 4 distinct seasons but with mostly moderate summers, reasonable access to major shopping and/or medical centers either south in Redding or north in Medford.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 05:52 AM
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My first thought on reading this was the NC or VA mountains, but location might be difficult. Asheville is clearly out, and probably the surrounding area, like Hendersonville. Boone has Appalachian State and Blowing Rock is a tourist town. The area around Highlands and Cashiers is gorgeous, but again, popular with tourists. Of course, there is the actual Mayberry, Mount Airy, but I imagine that is pretty touristy too (never been). You need to be at least 2,500 feet up to avoid the humidity. I once looked seriously at Roanoke, but it's not high enough. Maybe Bedford, nearby? Sounds like time for a road trip.

Last edited by thursdaysd; Aug 26th, 2022 at 05:56 AM.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 07:47 AM
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I'm having a somewhat hard time squaring your dislike of heat and humidity with your fondness of some of your preferences, but I say that as one who's spent most of his life in low-moderate temperature and low (summer) humidity areas, so maybe more my problem than yours.

I do think, however, that you should have a second look at parts of Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Both Oregon and Washington are sharply divided politically and culturally by the Cascade mountains. Eastern parts of both states are quite conservative socially and politically and I think it might behoove you to investigate (a little, anyway) some areas in those regions.

For example, as you travel east from Portland along the Columbia River, you enter farming, vineyard, orchard and ranching country that, it seems to me, offers many of the features you seek. Have a look at Hood River and The Dalles, Oregon, for example, or in fact the whole I-84 corridor pretty much all the way to Idaho. Towns like Pendleton or Enterprise offer easy access to marvelous outdoors adventures, and I suspect you'd find the social milieu to your liking.

Same goes for the Washington side of the Columbia. Moderately red politically, but some terrific communities to investigate, from White Salmon (across the river from Hood River) to the Walla Walla area and the Washington Palouse. When you described your ideal place and lifestyle, two places that popped into my head were the towns of Dayton and Pomeroy, Washington.

Then there's Idaho. Just up the road (US 12) from the Palouse are the twin towns of Clarkston WA and Lewiston ID. (You can guess the source of these names.) Both are very pleasant towns with a full range of facilities, but in minutes you're in terrific outdoors environments. Then farther north in Idaho you could look at the Coeur d'Alene area, which is extremely attractive but might be too close to Spokane for your comfort (but Spokane is no socialist hotbed either, ha ha.) Then farther north, up to the Idaho "panhandle" are places like Bonners Ferry and Sandpoint - very "western," in marvelous natural settings. Quite red politically too.

There are some other areas in WAOR/ID that you might do some googling around. For example, the Rogue River Valley in southern Oregon (Medford, Grants Pass etc.) is not nearly as "Oregon" as Portland and the Willamette Valley, if you get my meaning. Or the east slopes of the Cascades, all the way from Bend, Oregon north to Goldendale and the Yakima Valley in Washington, then north to places like Wenatchee, Chelan and two towns that might fit the bill in Omak and Oroville WA, surrounded by orchards, red rocks and pine trees.

I'll quit there for now. Happy hunting!
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 10:04 AM
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We used to live in northern MA, close to the NH border. Small, mostly picturesque towns and villages. A bit of space between neighbors and some have acreage. Otherwise, somewhere in CO, up in the foothills, as far away from Aspen and the like as you would want to be. All sizes of settlements from huge to tiny, and some with acreage, if that's what you want. Good luck finding your dream place.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 01:34 PM
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I live in Johnson City, TN - 1 hour from Asheville, NC. It is Washington county if you are looking it up. We have had a lot of people moving to this area to retire. It is beautiful with the mountains and the lakes, and the people are very friendly. Johnson City is the bigger of the 3 towns that make up the" Tri-Cities" but there is a lot of rural area around and much smaller towns around here. The counties that you listed in Northeast TN/Western NC are all close by me and have some beautiful land and views. I think Jonesborough, Erwin, and Greenville TN might be what you are looking for. You can find Target and Sam's , etc...in Johnson City and/or Asheville. Good luck with your choices!

Last edited by willowjane; Aug 26th, 2022 at 01:44 PM.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 02:59 PM
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I know someone who just moved to Durango, CO. There are four seasons and low humidity. Lots of outdoor recreational opportunities. There is some tourism in the summer and a very small college but they don't have a big impact. Not sure if it is affordable anymore.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 03:32 PM
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Not sure if it is affordable anymore.

It isn't. And the closest Costco (on OP's list) is probably in New Mexico.

Last edited by Melnq8; Aug 26th, 2022 at 03:35 PM.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 07:23 PM
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Look at the Olympic peninsular in Washington State, possibly the Port Townsend area.

Last edited by Michael; Aug 26th, 2022 at 07:55 PM.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 07:34 PM
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Hi suze. Sorry for the late reply. I didn't realize you can only post five times in 24 hours. And no, I don't mind answering questions at all.

I'd love to visit most of Oregon, without a doubt! I can't think of anywhere I wouldn't at least like to visit and explore! But I've lived in a very liberal place for so long now that I refuse to retire in one. Especially when one city (like Portland or Minneapolis) basically decides the rules for everyone else. I'll leave it at that because I don't want to be rude or insulting to anyone or their values. It's the same reason I've ruled out Vermont, which about broke my heart for how stunning it is. Fall is my favorite season and you don't get much better than Vermont.

In Oregon, there's also the growing, out of control homelessness, which is spreading to smaller towns (according to folks I've chatted with who live in small towns). Lastly, I'm not a fan of the legalized drug culture. Even major companies are leaving Oregon in droves. Again, I'd like to visit, but not live the rest of my life there. There are conservative people in Minneapolis, too. Most of the state is actually red outside the Twin Cities. But it's not uncommon for folks to be more comfortable around other like-minded people. I just want to live in an area where I don't have to worry whose toes I'm going to step on if I say something that triggers them and get blasted for it. Since I don't like it, I will leave instead of insisting that they change.

But I also ruled out Oregon for its topography in the less liberal areas (eastern Oregon). Many parts of eastern Oregon are desert-like and less green, much like Arizona, New Mexico, and rural parts of Texas. Ideally, I'd like to be around a mountainous area with lots of trees, rivers, lakes, etc., Or at least big green rolling hills like Pennsylvania has.

As for New Hampshire being far away from the rest of the country, I mean in relation to road trips. I haven't flown in 21 years because I'd rather drive and see a whole lot more of the country. When I said New Hampshire is farther away from the rest of the country, I meant drive time-wise. For example, I'd love to take a road trip to Yellowstone. When I looked it up, it takes just over 17 hours to drive from New Hampshire to Tennessee That's two full days of driving. Three or four if you stop to take in the sights along the way. But, if I live in Tennessee, it's more centralized to every other state. I haven't taken New Hampshire off the list completely though. Cozy winters and jaw-dropping Autumns aren't easy to cross off any list.

Originally Posted by suze View Post
I spend a lot of time there. It's not all so liberal if that is what you are saying. Pick up trucks with gun racks, chewing tobacco at grocery checkout, plenty of evangelical Christian congregations, conservative politicians and public opinion, etc. Sure yes for more red go "east of the mountains" in either Oregon or Washington state.

New Hampshire (and Vermont in a slightly different way) may be liberal or conservative but mostly they are about minding your own business and doing your own things while you help your neighbor. People of extremely different backgrounds and belief systems pull each others cars out of snowbanks or share firewood in the winter -haha.

But more important... I have a pretty strong impression this person wants to live on the east coast US one of the southern states in the 'bible belt' so to speak. I know they asked for opinions. But their list seems pretty much already heavily-weighted in that direction. Nothing wrong with that. Narrows down the options if they have a particular region in mind to focus on.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 07:35 PM
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Hi thursdaysd, thanks for the reply! Your thoughts are spot on. I've researched every one of them before posting. I was disappointed that Blowing Rock, NC was so touristy. But, because that's one of my lesser concerns, I like Blowing Rock enough to not cross it off the list until I can get there to see it myself. That means I just put Highlands, Cashiers, and Bedford on the list to check out tonight. Mount Airy is definitely on the list for a visit but, yes, that's too touristy.

The road trip is coming. I'll be buying an SUV within the next two months. After that, I'm on the road.

Originally Posted by thursdaysd View Post
My first thought on reading this was the NC or VA mountains, but location might be difficult. Asheville is clearly out, and probably the surrounding area, like Hendersonville. Boone has Appalachian State and Blowing Rock is a tourist town. The area around Highlands and Cashiers is gorgeous, but again, popular with tourists. Of course, there is the actual Mayberry, Mount Airy, but I imagine that is pretty touristy too (never been). You need to be at least 2,500 feet up to avoid the humidity. I once looked seriously at Roanoke, but it's not high enough. Maybe Bedford, nearby? Sounds like time for a road trip.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 07:36 PM
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Hi Gardyloo. Yes, my dislike of heat and humidity aren't 100% compatible with the areas I'm interested, which makes that a compromise if I find a good location. But, they're still a consideration. Like thursdaysd mentioned, it's an elevation issue. There are towns at higher elevations where heat and humidity are lessened, so the info I gave would lead those who know the area to know that and make suggestions accordingly. Even here in Minnesota, we get a lot of heat and humidity.

Unfortunately, I'm still excluding Oregon completely. As I said earlier, the reason is also topographical. Living in a conservative area of the state means land that looks more like Arizona, New Mexico, and parts of Texas and I'm looking for mountains, trees, lakes, rivers, etc., Politically, it boils down to this: I've lived in a state where the big city determines how everyone else in the state lives. Living in a conservative area of the state doesn't change that and I've flat out had enough of it. This is one of the biggest reasons I want to relocate in the first place. I want and need to live in an area where this isn't an issue anymore. The only logical conclusion is to move to a predominantly conservative state. But still, if I find a location that has absolutely everything else and I can't pass it up, I'd then consider it. That's why I left so many liberal states open as an option. But, this just isn't a possibility in the PNW because the locations I'm after are all in heavily liberal areas... the main reason why I'm moving.

Idaho was initially my very first choice. For years I wanted to see visit Coeur D'Alene. But it's grown so huge I wouldn't live there. (I like towns, or even unincorporated areas, of 1-2K population.) Much about Idaho has changed in the last few years. I was in touch with a realtor from there. With the huge population boom from everyone moving there, especially Californians, the land and housing prices have skyrocketed to the point that the locals can't afford to buy anything. Right now they're struggling to pay their rents and trying to work 2-3 jobs. Homelessness among locals is increasing and they're getting very bitter about what outsiders have done to their economy. I just don't want to add to that problem right now. Especially since Idaho doesn't tick all of my boxes anyway. (Winters last far too long and I want plenty of fruit trees, berry bushes, and a garden.)

Thanks for taking the time to reply with your thoughts so thoroughly! I do appreciate it!

Originally Posted by Gardyloo View Post
I'm having a somewhat hard time squaring your dislike of heat and humidity with your fondness of some of your preferences, but I say that as one who's spent most of his life in low-moderate temperature and low (summer) humidity areas, so maybe more my problem than yours.

I do think, however, that you should have a second look at parts of Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Both Oregon and Washington are sharply divided politically and culturally by the Cascade mountains. Eastern parts of both states are quite conservative socially and politically and I think it might behoove you to investigate (a little, anyway) some areas in those regions.

For example, as you travel east from Portland along the Columbia River, you enter farming, vineyard, orchard and ranching country that, it seems to me, offers many of the features you seek. Have a look at Hood River and The Dalles, Oregon, for example, or in fact the whole I-84 corridor pretty much all the way to Idaho. Towns like Pendleton or Enterprise offer easy access to marvelous outdoors adventures, and I suspect you'd find the social milieu to your liking.

Same goes for the Washington side of the Columbia. Moderately red politically, but some terrific communities to investigate, from White Salmon (across the river from Hood River) to the Walla Walla area and the Washington Palouse. When you described your ideal place and lifestyle, two places that popped into my head were the towns of Dayton and Pomeroy, Washington.

Then there's Idaho. Just up the road (US 12) from the Palouse are the twin towns of Clarkston WA and Lewiston ID. (You can guess the source of these names.) Both are very pleasant towns with a full range of facilities, but in minutes you're in terrific outdoors environments. Then farther north in Idaho you could look at the Coeur d'Alene area, which is extremely attractive but might be too close to Spokane for your comfort (but Spokane is no socialist hotbed either, ha ha.) Then farther north, up to the Idaho "panhandle" are places like Bonners Ferry and Sandpoint - very "western," in marvelous natural settings. Quite red politically too.

There are some other areas in WAOR/ID that you might do some googling around. For example, the Rogue River Valley in southern Oregon (Medford, Grants Pass etc.) is not nearly as "Oregon" as Portland and the Willamette Valley, if you get my meaning. Or the east slopes of the Cascades, all the way from Bend, Oregon north to Goldendale and the Yakima Valley in Washington, then north to places like Wenatchee, Chelan and two towns that might fit the bill in Omak and Oroville WA, surrounded by orchards, red rocks and pine trees.

I'll quit there for now. Happy hunting!
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 07:37 PM
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Hi joto, thanks for replying! The mountains of Colorado were the first place to come to mind when I thought about escaping the summer heat. I'll be completely honest. I've done very little research into Colorado because of how liberal it is but MOSTLY because of the marijuana. I really, really, really am sick of smelling it! I love the location of the state being so close to many of the national parks and other things I'd like to visit though. But, again, a liberal state where one city decides how everyone else has to live is what I'm trying to get away from. If they enjoy liberalism, I have no problem with that and wouldn't try to change how they live. So, the logical conclusion is that I, myself move to an area where I'm more relaxed and comfortable. Thanks again!!!

Originally Posted by joto View Post
We used to live in northern MA, close to the NH border. Small, mostly picturesque towns and villages. A bit of space between neighbors and some have acreage. Otherwise, somewhere in CO, up in the foothills, as far away from Aspen and the like as you would want to be. All sizes of settlements from huge to tiny, and some with acreage, if that's what you want. Good luck finding your dream place.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 07:38 PM
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willowjane! I was hoping someone from your area would chime in! I used to live in Knoxville/Maryville for a few years but never made it up your way. I love the people so it wouldn't be a culture shock to me at all. I've become very familiar with the Tri-Cities and don't want want to live in them directly because of the larger populations. (Some pollution smells, too, if I remember correctly. From a waste yard or something like that?) But, they're great to have nearby for stocking up, a nice night out, etc.,

I've looked at small towns like Butler, Shady Valley, etc., that are nearby. I like most of what I've been learning and can't wait to explore the areas. Butler sounds good. My only concerns about these areas is that they're so rural that they're a lower priority when it comes to plowing roads in the winter. Being a homebody, that's not a big problem. I'm really looking forward to spending some time in all of these areas and looking at property.

--------------
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and Melnq8 - Hello! I'm limited to five posts in 24 hours so pardon me for lumping your's in with willowjane's! I'm willing to check out Durango. Even though Colorado isn't high on my list, weather-wise they're great, especially with the lower humidity. It will all come down to balancing the pros and cons along with things I'm willing to compromise on. So far, I'm still favoring East TN and NW NC. Affordability will be my final consideration once I have the possibilities narrowed down.

Originally Posted by willowjane View Post
I live in Johnson City, TN - 1 hour from Asheville, NC. It is Washington county if you are looking it up. We have had a lot of people moving to this area to retire. It is beautiful with the mountains and the lakes, and the people are very friendly. Johnson City is the bigger of the 3 towns that make up the" Tri-Cities" but there is a lot of rural area around and much smaller towns around here. The counties that you listed in Northeast TN/Western NC are all close by me and have some beautiful land and views. I think Jonesborough, Erwin, and Greenville TN might be what you are looking for. You can find Target and Sam's , etc...in Johnson City and/or Asheville. Good luck with your choices!
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 07:48 PM
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Michael, Washington, especially the peninsula and up in Bellingham, was top of my list years ago. Who can resist the tundra and rainforest areas? I even like a rainy and misty days. I don't get depressed by the lack of sunshine. Unfortunately, it turned out to be too liberal for my liking.

Again, I'm not trying to belittle anyone who's liberal. I've lived in many of them over my lifetime. I don't believe in moving somewhere and trying to change the local culture. I just don't want to retire in a strongly liberal state.

Originally Posted by Michael View Post
Look at the Olympic peninsular in Washington State.
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Old Aug 26th, 2022, 09:31 PM
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Maybe I should point out that NC is purple. We have a Dem governor and hopes of electing a Dem senator. Would probably have managed it last time if Cal Cunningham had behaved himself. Of course, gerrymandering has affected other races.
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