ATL to BOSTON - Culture Shock?

Sep 17th, 2006, 10:13 AM
  #41  
 
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Just remember that in winter you can bundle up and be comfortable outdoors if dressed appropriately. In contrast, in places where it gets really hot in summer, there's nothing you can do to be comfortable outdoors. My kids play outdoors all year round; relatives who live in Florida hide indoors for 5 or 6 months of the year.

Yes, our heating bills are higher of course, but our cooling bills are negligible; many of us get by with a couple of window air conditioners, and sometimes go a year or two without even sticking them in the windows.
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Sep 17th, 2006, 11:32 AM
  #42  
 
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Anon- all depends on your perspective. I can never put on enough clothing to feel comfortable outside, yet the heat does not bother me. (And I have spent time in south Florida and Savannah in the summer.)

For me, and others, it is the also the dreariness of winter - many a November or January where it seems there is no sun for weeks at a time. Somehow that is worse when it is so cold.
gail is offline  
Sep 17th, 2006, 12:23 PM
  #43  
 
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I'd suggest a nice eddie b goose down parka. any land above the mason-dixon gets chilly especially mid-Dec through March. I wasn't under the impression that Atlanta was so cheap. I talk to a lady in Rome, GA and she even told me people commute to Atlanta from there which is 1 1/2 hours drive. When driving through Atlanta I got the feeling that it is sprawling city, not exactly having the city limits within a defined area. Maybe Boston is more concentrated. Never been there.
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Sep 17th, 2006, 03:23 PM
  #44  
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Suze, I was born and raised in the Chicago area. While it has been many years ago, I do have some idea of what the winters could be like in Boston.
sk84fungirl is offline  
Sep 17th, 2006, 03:24 PM
  #45  
 
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I just don't understand that post at all.

starrsville is offline  
Sep 17th, 2006, 03:32 PM
  #46  
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starrsville, is that for me? or stephanie's post?
sk84fungirl is offline  
Sep 17th, 2006, 03:35 PM
  #47  
 
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If you're planning to just "drive around and check out the neighborhoods", I hope that the map you have is a darn good STREET map. Navigating your way around Boston is like nowhere else!
And be sure to practice on some "rotaries" while you're in Atlanta, I'm sure Atlanta is full of these need little traffic nightmare roundabouts!
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Sep 17th, 2006, 03:41 PM
  #48  
 
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Stephanie's Atlanta comments. I started to address them one by one - and then just erased my responses.

sk84fungirl, I would investigate
1) cost of real estate
2) taxes on the home where you would like to live
3) winter weather if you are not familiar with cold and wet winters
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Sep 17th, 2006, 04:14 PM
  #49  
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IF I make the move, I will rent for at least a year. As recommended areas have been posted, I've been researching more about them on the web and in the books I have. I am using the craigslist reference that I found in another post as well to see what may be available in those areas. There are pictures for many of the apts. Right now, I'm really liking the apts in Quincy.
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Sep 17th, 2006, 04:32 PM
  #50  
 
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Good that you are renting first! My advice then, is to rent as close to your most desirable location - even if you have to sacrifice space. Get close to work. Be in the midst of the action that you are interested in. And, then, after a year if you are still interested in staying you have a great idea of where to buy - as well as the resulting trade-offs (and there are ALWAYS trade-offs).

Good luck and enjoy the adventure!
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Sep 17th, 2006, 06:07 PM
  #51  
TKT
 
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I believe that your work place would be close to the Redline JFK/UMass stop.
Quincy is a good call. Try to be as close as you can to a red line stop. Give the Dorchester area near the transit stop a try, may not be your type of area, but take a look. If you were able to walk to work that would make life so much easier.
One of my favorite restaurants is near there, an authentic Polish Cafe.
http://cafepolonia.com/
If you have a chance give it a try.
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Sep 17th, 2006, 06:40 PM
  #52  
 
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Well then, if you grew up in Chicago, Boston's winter weather won't be a shock for you.
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Sep 18th, 2006, 05:45 PM
  #53  
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TKT, from everything I've found out so far...I believe you are exactly right. The JFK/UMASS stop will likely be the one that is the closest. I'm flying in next Thursday morning and will see. Going to try and do quite a bit in the three days I'm there. This is an exploratory visit for me.

Thanks
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Sep 20th, 2006, 06:04 PM
  #54  
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Another neighborhood question...

Do you have any feedback on Norwood? Can't seem to find it on any of my maps but know it is in Norfolk county.

Any input is greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
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Sep 21st, 2006, 03:00 AM
  #56  
 
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Norwood is a typical middle-class bedroom community; my cousins live there. Can't imagine why you'd consider it. You would have to own a car, and rental options are probably limited.
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Sep 21st, 2006, 03:03 AM
  #57  
 
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Mapquest give the distance from my cousins' house to Dorchester as 18 miles. It's outside the "Route 128" perimeter highway, a commute of an hour if you're lucky. If you consider Norwood to be a "neighborhood" you seriously need help in planning this trip.
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Sep 21st, 2006, 03:26 AM
  #58  
 
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Distances are difficult to measure in terms of time in Boston area. Lots of peole commute from Norwood area to many parts of Boston. 18 miles can take 18 minutes or an hour and a half, depending on where those 18 miles are and time of day/week.

Time to plan an extended visit - a few weeks hopefully. Driving around is a great idea - yes, you will get lost and be annoyed, but that is part of the exploration experience. Spend some time chatting with people - go to Norwood and find a local restaurant in off-peak hours and chat with the waitress, etc about lifestyle there. Do the same someplace else. Drive around at night, during rush hour. Boston Immersion 101.

Then come back here and we can all be self-proclaimed critics and experts on your impressions.
gail is offline  
Sep 21st, 2006, 05:14 AM
  #59  
 
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gail, the OP has said she's coming to Boston on Thursday for a couple of days only. She'll need to make the most of her limited time.

I'm very surprised that she picked out Norwood, since earlier in the thread she said, "While I like the city, I don't mind the suburbs at all. If in the suburbs, want to be easily accesible to a train of some kine. This being said, I have no clue if the office is even close to a train station. I have to figure all of that out."
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Sep 21st, 2006, 03:20 PM
  #60  
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Well, I asked about Norwood to get feedback on the commute and the area as I did not know where it was. I posted it as I was looking at craigslist at apartments and saw one in Norwood. Yes, I could have mapquested it...but I was interested in more than just the distance.

I used the term neighborhood, because much of literature I pick up refers to Boston's surrounding areas as neighborhoods.

Thank you.
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