Ban photos in museums

Old Oct 12th, 2020, 01:39 PM
  #121  
 
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How times have changed. Everyone can take pix, everywhere, whenever. There is no film to buy or develop. There is no barrier.

Years ago in the era of (gasp) film, I served as volunteer photographer because I was carrying a "real" camera. I was often asked to take another traveler's picture, or rather, a picture of a couple, at a particularly special spot. I suspect it was my observed behavior in composing shots and the obvious unlikeliness that I would run off with someone's camera that got me the duty. So I would take pix of a couple in front of, yes, the Eifel Tower and other famous places. I was particularly proud of getting a great composition, such as a vertical shot of a nice couple in front of a waterfall or one from the top of the Arc de Triomphe where I carefully arranged the ET over the shoulder of the pair. The only one I ever asked for myself and Mrs. P was the Morocco camel setup with Mrs. P on the camel and me holding its lead. That one cost me a few dirham, if I remember correctly, but I got my camera back and the shot was well composed.
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Old Oct 12th, 2020, 03:00 PM
  #122  
 
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I have not encountered the crowds of photo snappers that have offended some here. I do take photos in all sorts of places, including museums and restaurants. I believe it enhances my experience and I use them to illustrate photo books I make from my trip reports. I would never look at a post card again, it would become more paper clutter and I have enough of that.

I have heard the comments that taking photos prevents me from appreciating the art/scenery/class play/social gathering. But I feel I am appreciating it plenty. There are many ways of making experiences meaningful and the very fact that I am doing it means it is meaningful to me. In general I believe people are smart enough to know whether they are truly experiencing something.

I have been asked by people I didnít know to snap their pictures in many places. The Pont des Arts after a proposal. The steps of City Hall after a wedding. In front of the White House. A park bench in Paris to document a womanís experience of her picnic in the Place des Vosges. If such people can now accomplish the same mission themselves with selfies, why not?
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Old Oct 12th, 2020, 06:03 PM
  #123  
 
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Originally Posted by scrb11 View Post
For many it's actually a business.

There are many "travel bloggers" who travel the world and photograph themselves in famous settings. These aren't just people holding up selfie sticks. They're typically young attractive women, who put on nice outfits, have hair and makeup done and then have their boyfriends or professional photographers take pictures and videos of them, not with phone cameras but expensive gear. Then they have Youtube channels and lots of Instagram followers.

I was in Murano last year and saw a couple taking pictures by the colorful houses -- maybe it was one of the other islands. She was dressed up for a hot summer day and he was going around with a big camera, maybe had lighting as well.

There is or at least was a trend of having a couples wedding photos done in Europe. I guess really honeymoon photos.Including hauling the bridal gown .

The same sort of thing can be arranged for a single person.

You may be right it was for youtube etc but it could just have been somebody who booked a photographer.
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Old Oct 13th, 2020, 10:28 PM
  #124  
 
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We were watching from the seats way up above the rock pools surrounding Tanah Lot (an iconic seaside temple perched on rock in Bali) as a young couple in formal wear and a photographer sat up to use the site as a backdrop. It was fascinating to watch as they took about over a half hour to get what they wanted as the photographer kept shooing away any tourist or tout who came around that side of the rock. Seemed a bit presumptuous to stake a claim to such a famous site like that but I suppose it wouldn't do to have people milling around in the background either. Most films and photoshoots around something famous prevent someone from enjoying the site in the meantime. Which photo or video is important enough to inconvenience others?

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Old Oct 13th, 2020, 10:57 PM
  #125  
 
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Usually cities require or at least provide photo permits with fees to pay. The city will impose limits on what's allowed.

Most of the stuff I see doesn't really bother anybody. Partly because the photographer doesn't want other people getting in the way so they show up early morning. Partly because local photographers know the area and have a reason to stay out of trouble.

OTOH at times it's fairly obviously that the couple are actually traveling with a photographer. Those couples have less incentive to play nice so to speak.

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