Wont eat french food---HELP please

Jan 26th, 2006, 01:35 PM
  #21  
 
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You will find more ham sandwiches and french fries than you can shake a stick at. She'll probably give crepes a shot.

Stay near a market street (like Rue Mouffetard) and she can literally window shop for food (all take out).

If you want to eat one nice meal, but are stressed about bringing her, I'd recommend a restaurant called Atelier Maitre Albert. It is a fabulous rotisserie place, so there aren't a lot of sauces or complicated items, and even my picky 15 yr old eater was VERY pleased with the chicken. Here's the web site you can peruse the menu:

http://www.ateliermaitrealbert.com/f...treAlbert.html
wliwl is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 01:35 PM
  #22  
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Thank you to all you nice people who have given me helpful advise.

Why do others have to be so judgemental ??

I only asked a simple question.

She does like FRENCH fries but we call them chips here in Scotland and theres nothing french about them.

I'm going to Paris because we both want to . Just because shes a fussy eater doesn't mean we shouldn't go !!

I'll take the helpful comments on board and throw the rest in the bin where they belong.

Theres nothing wrong with Bercy .
highland_lass is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 02:26 PM
  #23  
 
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My picky eater was 11 when we went to Paris. There was only one place we ate where she couldn't find something she liked on the menu...she ate bread and butter and lived to tell the tale.
missypie is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 02:27 PM
  #24  
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Au revoir to all you perfect people out there !

I'm going to have a lovely time in Paris , I'll even let you know how I get on .

Long live bread , butter , hot dogs and ham sandwiches !!

( Do some Americans actually think French fries are FRENCH , just a thought ??? )
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Jan 26th, 2006, 02:37 PM
  #25  
 
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No, we all know they probably originated in Belgium, but they're certainly ubiquitous in France and a regular part of the cuisine.......your point?
StCirq is online now  
Jan 26th, 2006, 02:37 PM
  #26  
 
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Ummm...actually French Fries are French. Pomme frites.
wliwl is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 02:39 PM
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highland_lass, one more thought (from a rather picky eater!)

Fondue is easy to find throughout Paris, and that might be something she would enjoy. It's "French," but still pretty basic.
TarheelsInNj is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 02:44 PM
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I second the suggestion to stay near the rue Mouffetard for a great selection of food unless you're locked into Bercy. I took my 14 yr old son (not a picky eater but a voluminous eater!)and stayed in an apt. on the rue Mouff. He wandered the street ordering his own food from the various walk up shops and casual restaurants. Italian, Greek, Chinese, sub sandwiches, crepes, and crepes and more crepes...anything he wanted. LOVE that area with its busy street market. If you don't stay there at least take a peek at lunch time.
amwosu is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 02:47 PM
  #29  
 
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A ham and cheese sandwich would be a Croque Monsieur, pizza might even be found in Bercy, (I would think).. Le BigMac might not be in Bercy but they do serve french fries better known there as frites and if she feels adventurous, there is a world of food waiting for her to discover..I have not really noticed any American style diners in Paris so I would doubt you would find any in Bercy and if I am right, good for France!
But just for curiousity, why do you want American diner food if you are from Scotland?
Omelets are very good in France and as someone said, they do a mean Roast Chicken ( poulet roti) .. and if all else fails, know that if she gets hungry enough, she will eat something..
If you want to go to France, is the food not a part of the experience?
Good luck.
Scarlett is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 02:48 PM
  #30  
 
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http://www.private-paris.com

Just in case you're interested...several apt. on the rue Mouffetard in the 5th.
amwosu is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 02:55 PM
  #31  
 
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How does one know one doesn't eat French food BEFORE you go to France?

As others have said, plenty of MickeyD's and Quick Burgers to keep a kid happy. Plenty of pizza, Greek food, etc. Plenty of restaurants that cater to families (Hippo? is that the name?).

If you make her sit with you while you eat at a "French" cafe, she'll find lots of food she'd enjoy if she tries.

And/or pack granola bars, cereal bars, Power bars, etc. so she always has something to eat when she's hungry. MAKE SURE YOU get the chance to enjoy the food!

Don't stay in Bercy (nothing against Bercy). Stay in central Paris.
starrsville is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 02:55 PM
  #32  
 
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Go to supermarket delis (like Carrefour) and they'll have a nice selection of all kinds of things you can take out. Go to her favorite fast food chains' websites and they'll tell you where the Paris locations are. Pizza is so popular in that part of Europe that you should be able to find it in any virtually any type of restaurant. They also have Kentucky Fried Chickens but I think they are called "Old Kentucky"s. Also when ordering a hambuurger, make sure it will be beef. Some places use horsemeat or mix it in.
scheraulei is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 03:00 PM
  #33  
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Thank you Scarlett , I do appreciate your kind advice.

Theres more chance of an American Diner in Paris than a Scottish cafe .

I'm probably about to be shouted down here but , no , we dont really consider sampling traditional french fare to be an important part of going to France. We're going to sample a beautiful city and are excited to be going . Eating is just something we have to do regularly when we're there.

Theres a lot of " foodies" out there obviously who wont agree but each to his own.

Thank you again.
highland_lass is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 03:05 PM
  #34  
 
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Evidently everyone invented french fries: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Fries
Passepartout is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 03:16 PM
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Everyone invented French fries, but only the Scots invented deep fried Mars bars.
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Jan 26th, 2006, 03:18 PM
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Well, there IS an American Diner in Paris in St. Germain at 17 Rue des Ecoles.

Here's the link -
http://www.breakfast-in-america.com/intro.html

Enter the site and locate the menu in a PDF file. Burgers, milkshakes, etc. You will think you are in an American diner in Paris! Well, you are.
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Jan 26th, 2006, 03:34 PM
  #37  
cmt
 
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I don't really understand this question. This is an older child who is apparently Scottish, who apparently wants to eat the kind of food offered in American fast-food chains, i.e., an American "junk food" version of casual American (e.g., hamburgers) and Italian (pizza) food, and, though it seems she may never have been to France, she has decided not to eat any food that is "French," which, of course includes a wide range of foods prepared in a wide variety of extremely different regional styles.

I don't know France very well, and the question doesn't quite add up, but, nevertheless, taking it at face value, and attempting to be somewhat helpful, my suggestion is to buy food and beverages in grocery stores, produce stores, and bakeries, and make sandwiches with ham and other ingredients that your daughter likes, and have picnics in parks where it is allowed. I thought ham sandwiches on baguettes were pretty standard French fast food, by the way. If she'd be willing to try pizza in places that are not fast food chains, you an probably find some genuine Italian pizza places, and many pizza places that serve pizza prepared in a somewhat French way. If she loves French fries, and is willing to try some that may be better than the chains' versions, you might try some casual Belgian restaurants.
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Jan 26th, 2006, 03:35 PM
  #38  
 
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"But just for curiousity, why do you want American diner food if you are from Scotland?"
Good question,Scarlett...Scottish beef is so superior to American beef that I can't believe anyone would prefer a big mac!

How much "American" food is available in Scotland?
jody is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 03:45 PM
  #39  
 
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When I was growing up, I was never allowed pizza, burgers or french fries.

As a result I have developed into a "fussy eater": I deplore the popular diet of my native land (Canada, as it happens)

Therefore I go to France as often as I can, to eat the food I crave: the endlessly varied, mouth-wateringly delicious food of France.....

....Though my "pickiness" does not limit me to French cooking. Earlier this week, on Robbie Burns Day, I asked my spouse, whose doctoral studies entailed 3 years' residence in Edinburgh:

"Why, in 29.5 years, have you NEVER made me haggis???" ...LOL
tedgale is offline  
Jan 26th, 2006, 04:02 PM
  #40  
 
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"the Scots invented deep fried Mars bars."

[weeping], Please can I try one? lol
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