What to Wear in Paris

Jan 1st, 2007, 12:50 PM
  #21  
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No criticism taken. You're right about the capris being easier to wear with sandals. I don't mind wearing long sarongs with sandals either (they're the EASIEST thing in the world to travel with - they saved my life in Africa). I have a red halter dress that I'm dying to wear in Paris (somewhere appropriate, of course) but the shoe thing might mean I have to leave it home. By the way, I am bringing one pair of heels to wear to the opera.
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Jan 1st, 2007, 01:02 PM
  #22  
 
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I didn't think that the OP was into dresses one way or the other (she said she was fine with it). If she wants to dress up, that is terrific. But if she is more comfy in jeans and sneakers, there is nothing wrong with that either. I somehow doubt that the French worry a lot about what to wear when they come here (making sure to wear shorts, sneakers and a t-shirt so they can fit in).



nbodyhome is offline  
Jan 1st, 2007, 01:14 PM
  #23  
 
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Smart and stylish is the appropriate description.
If you take a moment of care in evaluating your attire, you will look fine in Paris.
EngIcedave is offline  
Jan 1st, 2007, 01:41 PM
  #24  
nbujic
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hi,
I have visited Paris more than 20 times.
Summers can be hot and a sundress or a skirt is just fine .
You can find very nice looking and comfortable footware ( but exp.) at Mephisto or Arche stores in big cities
in Canada (or Paris )!
 
Jan 1st, 2007, 01:48 PM
  #25  
 
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Merrill sandals are the only way to go. They are chic and very comfortable. Remember that lots of places will not be airconditioned in France...so dress cooly, what ever that means to you. No matter how one dresses, most Europeans can spot who is the tourist and what country they come from....so don't worry about it.
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Jan 1st, 2007, 01:56 PM
  #26  
nbujic
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P.S.
I think the Opera season is over by July 15th.
 
Jan 1st, 2007, 02:06 PM
  #27  
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I've got my eye on La Traviata at the Palais Garnier on July 3rd. Tickets aren't on sale, yet, though.
ValCanada is offline  
Jan 1st, 2007, 02:10 PM
  #28  
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I don't mind looking like a tourist - nothing wrong with that at all (in fact, as a solo traveller, that means you meet WAY more people) - but looking like a tourist doesn't mean you can't be stylish.
ValCanada is offline  
Jan 1st, 2007, 02:30 PM
  #29  
 
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Lucky you, ValCanada! That's my favorite opera. Have a great time.
L84SKY is offline  
Jan 1st, 2007, 02:32 PM
  #30  
 
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My response to the 9,000 other times this sort of question has been asked is the same: Wear clothes. People generally look better in clothes than they do naked. That is why clothes were invented.
FauxSteMarie is offline  
Jan 1st, 2007, 02:55 PM
  #31  
 
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Just marking the 1,334th "what to wear in Paris" question on Fodors.

Keep up the good fight Suze. I'm with you all the way.

OTOH, it would probably be best if newbies wear their flip flops and jeans. That would make it easier for the rest of us to find a table in Paris, except at Macs or Pizza Hut. If it was your cafe who would you seat, a derelict or a well dressed couple? You don't need high heels and a tux. "Business casual" is comfortable and presentable everywhere. I'm way out of line of course, with the jeans crowd.

hopscotch is offline  
Jan 1st, 2007, 03:26 PM
  #32  
 
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And people say the discussions in the Lounge are convoluted...

Zut alors!
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Jan 1st, 2007, 03:48 PM
  #33  
 
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thanks Hopscotch. i try ;-)

Val, make sure the heels for the opera & the red dress work together. seriously, that's the key, taking pieces that are versatile & go together.
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Jan 1st, 2007, 04:19 PM
  #34  
 
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>>OTOH, it would probably be best if newbies wear their flip flops and jeans. That would make it easier for the rest of us to find a table in Paris, except at Macs or Pizza Hut. If it was your cafe who would you seat, a derelict or a well dressed couple?<<

You realize that you can wear jeans and not look homeless? I do it all the time.

Most of my clothes in Europe were actually not jeans. They are too heavy to be carrying around, and I prefer stuff I can hand-wash. So I actually dress better than I do in the US, due to ease. I wore a dress one evening to dinner a few doors down from the hotel, and I was probably one of the best dressed there. Plenty of French people in jeans, etc. (not so much t-shirts).

nbodyhome is offline  
Jan 1st, 2007, 05:27 PM
  #35  
 
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A sundress? Sorry, sweetie darling, but it isn't 1985. Laura Ashley is long forgotten.

Not everyone wants to dress for an afternoon at a food court in a mall in Missouri.

I am throwing profiteroles at you.
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Jan 1st, 2007, 05:38 PM
  #36  
nbujic
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a sundess can be a cool, slick linen number or a sexy mini - nothing 1985
about it!
 
Jan 1st, 2007, 05:57 PM
  #37  
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Maybe sundress is the wrong word - I'll be wearing summer dresses all designed and purchased in this century - no Laura Ashley (but one is a Ralph Lauren). In any event, I'm not so much worried about the clothes I'll be wearing as I am the shoes. And I'll take any and profiteroles thrown my way!
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Jan 3rd, 2007, 06:11 AM
  #38  
E_M
 
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Someone once said that dressing well in Paris was a requirement; dressing well in Italy was simply good manners.
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Jan 3rd, 2007, 11:32 AM
  #39  
 
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I can assure you that, after many trips to Europe, no one over there is as concerned about how you dress as some of the so called fashion dictators on this board. Dressing to "fit in" is such a, in my opinion, crock. The moment you open your mouth to mangle the local language your national origin will be obvious.

I live in the DC area and can tell you that not one person has disparaged tourists from anywhere due to the clothes they are wearing. I have lived in the area for over 35 years.

In all countries/cities where tourism is a major part of daily life (as it is in Washington, DC), merchants are delighted to take your money no matter what you are wearing--and not a word will be said about your attire beyond, perhaps, a shrug (if your attire is skimpy or simply funny). Then the locals go about their business.

The obsession with dressing to look like a local is again, a crock. In all countries attire has gotten less formal. Those uncomfortable with that fact of life can dress as though they were meeting The Queen of England at Buckingham Palace when they go to a restaurant or to the theater in Paris. For the rest of us, just wear what you would wear at home and be done with it.

And, of course, having said that, someone among the fashion obsessed will now start the 2,500th thread about shoes. Talk about a crock! How can anyone tell anyone else what shoes fit the other person's feet best?
FauxSteMarie is offline  
Jan 3rd, 2007, 12:01 PM
  #40  
 
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In Paris, you must wear business attire, that's the only sure way to fit in (unless it is a Sunday). Anything else and they will know you are just a visitor to the city, and you wouldn't want to experience such shame.

Seriously, who cares. Nobody will be looking at your feet anyway, and even if they did, does the opinion of a stranger you never saw before and will never see again really matter, compared to comfort?
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