what is the LA's European equivalent?

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Mar 3rd, 2016, 11:23 AM
  #41
 
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I have been to Miami many times and Istanbul but once. They are nothing, nothing alike, especially under Erdogan.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 11:25 AM
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I have been to Miami many times and Istanbul but once. They are nothing, nothing alike, especially under Erdogan.

One of the most diverse cities in the world is Toronto, but the study is limited to the US.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 11:26 AM
  #43
 
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Nothing in europe comes close to being an LA - though in terms of smog Paris could be close.

No very spread out metro areas - no LAs in Europe nor even close.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 01:09 PM
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Paris has always been a tiny city due to the fantacism of the French about keeping towns and villages independent and for this reason France represents all alone 40% of the municipalities in the EU. For example, it has 36,683 towns compared to 12,196 in Germany and 8,101 in Italy. For this reason, the city of Paris has a population of only 2,229,621 compared to the huge population of London or other big cities of the world.

However, as of 1 January 2016, "Grand Paris" was created as a way to get all of the suburban towns to cooperate and act as one entity, particularly regarding the regional infrastructure. The population of "Grand Paris" is about 7 million, so if you want to start comparing Paris to other big cities, you must henceforth integrate all of the information regarding the suburbs. For those interested in diversity, it should be pointed out that Sarcelles is quite similar to Tel Aviv, Alfortville can be compared to Yerevan, and Neuilly-sur-Seine is the most American city of France, just for a start.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 01:12 PM
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Frankfurt is called the Manhattan on the Main (River) and is most like Manhattan in many ways - lots of tall buildings and a financial capital of Europe along with London.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 01:21 PM
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Many of you are being a bit literal, no? I find the idea of Paris and NYC being comparable in significant ways an interesting one, and the OP's rejection of London as comparable to NYC thoughtful as well. The question isn't a dully literal one of climate, surely, or square mileage.

That said, Los Angeles is more difficult to place...London and Rome sprawl, and have film industries, and diverse populations, but the decentralized quality of L.A. may not exist at all in Europe.

I'd suggest Mumbai, but I don't know much about it at all, and it's not in Europe last I checked.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 05:49 PM
  #47
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@NewbE thank you! I tried to look beyond the classic look of the cities, especially into the souls they have and significance in their religions.

@rialtogrl yes, I agree with you. Thank you for your opinion I appreciate it.

@kerouac I agree with finding the center of LA. It definitely is DTLA, but could also be considered as Beverly Hills/West Hollywood easily. Regarding Paris, people definitely ignore the culture that nowadays is there. They are concentrated at the old 'white and European' citizens, even though Paris is a huge mix of culture, race, habits and types of people.

@traveller1959 I agree with your 'statistic' answer, but I was looking for more of a soul of a city answer. As London looks like NYC more Paris, I feel like Paris is the right equivalent to NYC. I am sorry if I was misleading.

@sandralist thank you so much! your response was very informing and helping! you got me totally and brought new insights.. I always appreciate a different view and a good opinion
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 07:44 PM
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The fact that there are more than 1200 Japanese restaurants in Paris is not at all a reflection of the size of the Japanese population here. Same with all of the Tex-Mex and Mexican restaurants.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 08:18 PM
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How many of these Japanese restaurants are held by Chinese who went on a fast reconversion course from a failing chinesevrestaurant ?
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 08:54 PM
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Did anyone ask what grade you are in?

Statistical answers are reductions for those who are afraid of making a mistake. You can reduce things to numbers to defend a position while it is much harder to explain the soul of a city, but certainly more interesting.

Oh I lovely time in Paris it is 105.39 km2.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 09:30 PM
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Who wrote this, IMD?

kerouac

There are other ways to ascertain ethnic diversity:

The type and number of restaurants that are not French.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 09:59 PM
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You cited one type of ethnic group. I tried to avoid an answer as not to continue this, but your answer proves the contention. We are speaking about diversity.
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Mar 3rd, 2016, 11:54 PM
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You're welcome, fromlatobcn. It was fun to think about your question.
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Mar 4th, 2016, 12:01 AM
  #54
 
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I think Kerouac knows Paris quite well.
But that doesn't seem to be important on these forums.
Locals who voice opinions others don't like are not listened to.
iMD - how much time per year do you spend in Paris ?

I work in the suburbs. When I sleep close to work I know I have reached my destination on the RER when I am the only white left.

Some time ago I greeted a white in the car by ´Dr Luvingstone i guess ?
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Mar 4th, 2016, 02:05 AM
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If you are looking for the "soul of a city" you will find that NYC is absolutely unique. There is a wealth of literature about "Gotham" to prove this. Take Le Corbusier's famous quote: "New York is a catastrophe. But a wonderful one."

So, what makes the "soul" of NYC? - Maybe he mix of business and residential uses, the cosmopolitan character, the art and entertainment scene. But the most striking feature of NYC is the ability to reinvent itself. Look at NYC in the seventies and how the city has recovered. The Museum of the City of New York has an excellent film about the Phoenix-like qualities of NYC.

If I look for a city in Europe with a similar soul, Berlin would come into my mind first, especially the reinvention part. London second, because of the mix of functions and the cosmopolitan character, but London had never to reinvente itself. And Paris has been the capital of France for centuries. It has problems, but mostly outside the boulevard peripherique.

L.A. would be more difficult. Most Europeans would say, L.A. has no soul. Here, L.A. is considered the most anti-European city. What has L.A.'s downtown area? - There is a business district with skyscrapers which is typical for U.S. cities, but hardly known in Europe. There is a concert hall in a Frank O. Gehry building, but visitors drive there from far away. There is hardly anything left from the Old Town. The historic Spanish pueblo has become a tourist trap with no life of its own.

The rest of L.A. is an array of suburbs with typical American structures and no equivalent in Europe. L.A.'s main cultural institution, the Getty Museum, is out of town. The UCLA is on a campus of her own, far away from the city centre. There are highly specialized neighbourhoods like Hollywood (entertainment), Santa Monica (beach) or Beverly Hills (luxury), whereas similar functions are spatially integrated in European cities.
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Mar 4th, 2016, 07:22 AM
  #56
 
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I think this can be said of any city, as each is shaped by unique forces (historical, economic, cultural, etc.).

Isn't that the sneaky point of this assignment? In looking for congruities which may or may not exist, our OP is forced to really examine these cities' souls. And consider which if a city's characteristics are really defining.

For example, in L.A., which is more central to its identity, the beach (es) or the sprawl? Impossible to answer, but fun to consider.
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Mar 4th, 2016, 09:59 AM
  #57
 
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Interesting !
I would suggest BAB (Biarritz Anglet Bayonne)
Of course it Is Much smaller but There are similarities.
1. Several "centers" and urbanization sprawling around (small houses, palm trees..)
2. Some of these houses are californian style
3. Several golf courses around
4. Blessed by warm weather (ok Much more rain)
5. Beach and surf culture
6. Connection with cinéma (latin American film festival)
7. Lot of spanish heard on the Street (coming from spain for week-end)
8. Mad on sport (rugby)
9. Easy going folks
10. In fact, it Is the ambition of the mayor to make the place california of Europe !
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