what is a SCOTTISH BREAKFAST like?

Oct 17th, 2002, 01:07 PM
  #1  
leslie
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
what is a SCOTTISH BREAKFAST like?

My hotel in Edinburgh offers a scottish breakfast. How is that different than an AMerican breakfast?
 
Oct 17th, 2002, 01:11 PM
  #2  
Jim
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
As someone who recently had a string of like 15 of them, I can tell you that it's a full, cooked breakfast. It's usually some combination of the following:

Juice
Cereal
Eggs
Bacon (talking British bacon, not American)
Sausage
Mushrooms
Cooked Tomatoes
Toast w/Jam or Butter
Tea or Coffee
 
Oct 17th, 2002, 02:07 PM
  #3  
Snoopy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
You left out Black Pudding, Jim. You don't get it everywhere, and you probably won't get it in Edinburgh.
 
Oct 17th, 2002, 02:45 PM
  #4  
frank
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Scottish breakfast is the same as english breakfast except that you also get black pudding.
Ask for the kippers instead!
 
Oct 17th, 2002, 02:53 PM
  #5  
singapore
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
WHat exactly is black pudding?
 
Oct 17th, 2002, 03:21 PM
  #6  
Brit
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Erm, do you really want to know? I looked the recipe up and here it is:

Its basically a blood sausage, the flavour of which varies between regions

125g pearl barley, rice or groats
125g fine oatmeal
pinch of salt and pepper
600 ml fresh pig's blood
250g beef or pork suet, diced
50g onions
sausage skins or casings.
 
Oct 17th, 2002, 03:36 PM
  #7  
scottish
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Isn´t oat porridge typical Scottish breakfast?
 
Oct 17th, 2002, 08:54 PM
  #8  
janis
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Almost always eggs x 2, bacon rashers x 2, sausages x 2, cold and/or hot cereal, grilled mushrooms, grilled tomatoes, fresh or canned fruit, toast, tea, coffee, juice --

and sometimes kippers, blood pudding, and yogurt,
 
Oct 17th, 2002, 11:13 PM
  #9  
Sheila
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
That's an interesting recipe for Black Pudding, but mind you don't break your teeth on the groats.

They haven't been legal tender here for some time.

(I think it should be "oats")

In my house, when I'm going the whole hog for visitors, it will beBR>
cereal
Toast
Croissants
Butteries
(further south you'd get a "morning roll" which is like a bap)
butter, jam, honey, marmalade
juice
your choice of
bacon
sausage- link and Lorne
Black pudding
(some people do fruit pudding, but I can't stand it)
mushrooms
eggs, cooked as you like
potato scones
sometime hash browns or bubble and squeak, or last night's left over potatoes

and an added variation is that the cute Scottish habit of frying everything that doesn't move can come into play here. People can and do put fried fruit cake on your breakfast (blech!)
 
Oct 18th, 2002, 12:01 AM
  #10  
egg
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
You can also get sliced haggis and very good it is too. The fried "fruit cake" was dumpling or cloutie dumpling which is often served fried for breakfast.
There's nothing yuk about it.
A full Scottish breakfast will set you up until dinner. You won't want any lunch.
 
Oct 18th, 2002, 02:45 AM
  #11  
PatrickW
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
A bit off topic, and not a breakfast suggestion but I still recall the expression on a TV presenter's face when a popular cook advising on using up those Christmas leftovers suggested....Christmas pudding fritters.
 
Oct 19th, 2002, 04:25 AM
  #12  
jahoulih
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Webster (www.m-w.com) says:

Main Entry: 1groat
Pronunciation: 'grOt
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English grotes, plural, from Old English grotan, plural of grot; akin to Old English grEot grit
Date: 12th century
1 usually plural but singular or plural in construction : hulled grain broken into fragments larger than grits
2 : a grain (as of oats) exclusive of the hull
 
Oct 19th, 2002, 05:39 AM
  #13  
John B.
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I don't know about hotels, but in B & Bs you get most of what has been listed. For North Americans the fried tomatoes were a bit greasy. Eggs too were done the same way.
 
Oct 19th, 2002, 07:01 AM
  #14  
mpprh
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Hi

Jim has the right answer.

Strangely, traditional Welsh, Irish, Scottish and English breakfasts seem to have much the same ingredients.

National pride ?

Peter
http://tlp.netfirms.com/
 
Oct 19th, 2002, 08:39 AM
  #15  
John
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Alternatively, an optional bacon roll washed down with Irn Bru is a popular breakfast among the drinking classes.
 
Oct 19th, 2002, 08:56 AM
  #16  
cd
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
What is kippers? bubble and squeak?
 
Oct 19th, 2002, 11:31 AM
  #17  
john
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

leslie,
What I remember from my Edinburgh breakfasts was greasy bangers and greasy everything else. How do the Scots keep their arteries open?
John
 
Oct 19th, 2002, 12:35 PM
  #18  
Tony Hughes
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I think John Sevy hit the nail right on the head with bacon roll (buttered - euch!) with regular irn-bru.
 
Oct 19th, 2002, 01:17 PM
  #19  
Haggis McSporran
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Dear John,

I must tell you that the fried breakfast is not the usual choice for us Scots. It is, however, what is provided in most tourist accommodation in the U.K.

I am pretty sure most Scots have some kind of cereal for breakfast, and we don't even fry it.

Some of us are getting just a bit fed up with the drunken, sentimental, whimsical, grease-guzzling Scottish stereotype we've been burdened with.

I've been silent about that for too many years.
 
Oct 19th, 2002, 01:31 PM
  #20  
carol
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
i agree with "haggis" - scottish/english etc. breakfast as served to tourists is as out of date as the "high tea". to the person who asked what are kippers and bubble and squeak, kippers are a type of smoked herring, and bubble and squeak is a combination of left over cabbage and potatoes fried up for breakfast which can be absolutely scrumptious
come to wales for breakfast, youll get laverbread (fried cooked seaweed in oatmeal)
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:58 PM.