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What are some less touristy areas you have visited in Italy?

What are some less touristy areas you have visited in Italy?

Old Sep 15th, 2005, 06:21 PM
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What are some less touristy areas you have visited in Italy?

Sorry for the naive question. I may be a first time poster and all i ask for is advice not criticism but thank you for those who attempted to help. so i would like to ask MAYBE a better question. in italy what are some less touristy areas to worth visiting. FYI i will be visiting for a while itll be more than a month so i will visit all the tourist sites and i would like to visit some less touristy areas. thank you. advice would be encouraged and criticism is discouraged
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 06:23 PM
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Vicenza (west of Venice).
 
Old Sep 15th, 2005, 06:32 PM
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Here's a whole thread about less touristy places in Sicily that some of us enjoyed: http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...p;tid=34483311
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 06:36 PM
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Another vote for Vicenza. Also Modena and Ferrara. And almost anywhere (except Taormina) in Sicily.
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 06:36 PM
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Here's a thread about Basilicata, a retion in the south that is not very touristy at all, except for just a few places (e.g. Matera and Maratea).
http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...p;tid=34401476
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 06:43 PM
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This town is not exactly ot touristy. People do visit. But it's not crowded with tourists, and most people don't think of going here. It's certainly different from the usual town.

http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...p;tid=34451773
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 06:43 PM
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Hello jones, at this point in planning your trip do you have some idea as to what major cities you wish to visit, such as Rome, Florence, Venice, Milan, Naples. What are your interest?

Do you wish you see a lot of historical sites, museums and art galleries? Small villages? Do you want to see some of the Lake regions, the Dolomities? The western coast of Italy or perhaps the eastern coast along the Adriatic? Further south or even Sicily?

Do you like to travel fast so to speak, a night in one place and the next night in another place or do you want to stay in some places for several nights to get more of a feeling for where you are? Do you enjoy restaurants and outdoor cafes where you can sit and have a long leisurely drink and people watch or do you like to be on the move every moment?

With a month you have a lot of options. Also, do you plan on renting a car or do you plan on getting around Italy by train?

I too like less toursity areas but a lot of them do require a car.

Look forward to your response. No criticism from me btw!!! I think it is great that you are going to Italy for a month.

Oh, one more question. What period of time are you planning on being in Italy? Best wishes.
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 06:45 PM
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Here's a nice small city very near Milan that most people don't visit: http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...p;tid=34442286
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 06:56 PM
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well first off thank you for your time and effort of helping me.
But when i go i would like to visit the main tourist sites, the main historical sites, a few museums only the major ones or the ones that are worth while that you may suggest. i would deffinitly like to see some small villages and towns.
When i go i would like to stay in my city/area for a extended period. I will probably spend at least one week in each city that i listed if not there than 4 nights in the city and the rest somewhere outside just in the area. and yes i do enjoy resturaunts where i can sit down and relax and just watch people go by.
i planned on using the public transportation in italy (buses and trains)
when i go itll probably be in the summer (yes i know thats when tourists are there) but i am still a student and i only have the summer.
also if you any suggestions on budget-savers that would be greatly appreciated also. (but im not planning on going tight money besides my acommadations) i plan to go with flow and buy what i want and do what i want
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 07:24 PM
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There are, and probably will be next summer as well, various promotions with reduced fares at

www.trenitalia.com

The problem is that they have to be booked in advance, and if you want to "go with the flow," you might find it too constricting to plan your travel days in advance.

Trains are the best way to get between Italian towns and cities; buses are best for small towns in the countryside (with a few exceptions, such as Siena).

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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 07:42 PM
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Sorry about my answer to you on the other post. Heres an idea. Why don't you try to get a train schedule from your major stops. Just board in the morning and get off at a stop along whatever route you are on. We took the train from Venice to Milan and went thru some really beautiful areas. I don't remember the names, but whats the difference? I would have loved to have the luxury (and time) to get off the train and explore. With a month in Italy, you can do that over and over and find your own off the beaten track little magical corners of planet earth.
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 08:25 PM
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jones,

If you plan to stay a week in each city, you may want to look into renting apartments in each city. This could help reduce your food budget, plus give you the feel of living like a local. Just a thought.

Tom
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 08:31 PM
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Hi jones, Tom (TRSW) has a great thought. Renting an apartment in each city. That might be something to look into. And if you got one with a clothes washer (not sure about a clothes dryer as they are not used as much as they are in the US) that would cut down on the amount of clothes you would need to take.

You could then take day trips by train or bus to less touristy places during the day also without having to pack and unpack etc. Excellent thought in my opinion. Best wishes to you.
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 09:19 PM
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A month seems like a long time as you begin your planning, but between the major areas you've mentioned, you will soon find that a month isn't as long as you thought!

For less-touristy areas, particularly as you won't have a car, you may want to stick to some of the medium-sized cities, that you can get relatively easily by train, and get around within the city by walking. We really enjoyed Ferrara, and it felt like a "real" town/city to us; the people strolling about on Saturday night seemed to live there (though as I don't speak much Italian, I could have been wrong). Lucca is another such city. Other posters have mentioned other, similar cities.

Even though I know that many, many tourists go to Rome, the two times I've been there, it's felt to me like a city more populated (especially compared to Venice) by the folks who live there. I really like Rome in that respect! Even, for example, when we visited popular gelatarias, that are mentioned in guidebooks and on Travel Talk, we were two Americans in a sea of Italians (and judging by the fact that they seemed familiar with the gelaterias, I would guess they were local, rather than vacationing, Italians).

In any city or town, wander off the tourist track, and into stores and restaurants that don't seem like the typical tourist kind of place. Some of the walking tours in books (even popular guide books) get you off the beatten tourist paths. The restaurants on back side streets, with no view, and maybe a little less cute on the outside, are usually more likely to have more locals and less tourists.

Enjoy!
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Old Sep 15th, 2005, 09:58 PM
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Hi Lexma, I agree with you. Good comments for jones.

I too like Ferrara, and close by is Bologna which is considered an "university city"...two places that you might really enjoy visiting jones.
Another thought is Pudua...there are so many wonderful places to see.

Why not get a good map of Italy and a good guide book...Barnes & Nobles or any other good book store near you should carry these. Perhaps a couple of "coffee table" type books at your library that have photographs, that would give you a better idea of sites that you would like to visit.

Sort of plan out an itinerary and then post back here for fine tuning this fabulous trip you will be taking. Have fun!!
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Old Sep 16th, 2005, 01:55 AM
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dependent on the time of year, the adriatic coast towns are not very touristy and, then, generally with other italians on holiday.

from the marches south of venice thru abruzzo on to bari, you'll encounter very few american tourists. rimini (in the marches) has a lot of history. while i can't necessarily recommend pescara, it is the hub of the very scenic abruzzi area. and the small fishing villages that are around bari have their own charm tho bari itself, being a port for cruise ships, will have its share of tourists.

whichever, you'll definitely be off the beaten track of the rick steves crowd (so far). best of luck and have a good trip. i'd kill to have a month in italy.
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Old Sep 16th, 2005, 02:15 AM
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Since I was one of the "harsh" ones on your initial, I'll try to "redeem" myself here!
For starters, when in a major city like Rome or Florence, have a panini for lunch in one of the little gasterias (I think that's what they are called). We made it a practice of doing it and usually found that we were the only non-locals in the place. (Not even one Italian tourist!)
In Venice, just get lost and wander the back alleys and narrow streets.
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Old Sep 16th, 2005, 05:42 AM
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We visited many towns in Le Marche this year and found them to be less crowded and more enjoyable than some of the more popular spots in Tuscany.
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Old Sep 16th, 2005, 06:33 AM
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hi Jones, Welcome to Fodors and I'm glad to see you reworded your post and will give us another chance to help...

My suggestion is anywhere you find yourself go to the places people use in their everyday lives. I have an endless fascination with post office, grocery stores, fabric shops, hardware supply, like that.

Another good thing is try to find schedules for local town or religious festivals. Anywhere local people will gather together. I've had amazing times at church bazaars, firemen's fund raising BBQ, elementary school pagents, wine tastings at a farmers market, etc. All cheap too.

Hostels are your cheapest place to sleep but an apartment by the week is a good suggestion as well.
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Old Sep 16th, 2005, 06:49 AM
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Seconding some of the others: most parts of Rome feel far less touristy than most parts of Florence or Venice. One place I love that's somewhat less touristy is Assisi.

One way to see more what local life is like is to go in off seasons, e.g. not in summer. Almost anywhere in Italy at Christmastime you will get a strong flavor of what Italians are really like (I wrote about this at http://www.straughan.com/italy/living/holidays.htm )

...though such a trip would need to be planned carefully because lots of Italians travel then, so roads are crowded and trains booked.

best regards,
Deirdré Straughan

www.straughan.com (personal)
www.tvblob.com (work)
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