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We saw a fox on Great Ormond St (and other sights up and down the Thames)

We saw a fox on Great Ormond St (and other sights up and down the Thames)

Mar 24th, 2014, 01:18 PM
  #41  
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Not to keep abusing the X90 Customer Service young man, but he used Selfridges as a point of reference no fewer than four times as my Nokia minutes trickled away. Since it's on Oxford St. I couldn't see its relevance to the question at hand. People paid to communicate directions on the telephone should be willing to use a map and compass points.

Texting with the Nokia phone perplexed me until H told me the trick: there's a button at top left you have to hit a couple of times until the three lines disappear. Then you can hit the letter keys enough times to get what you want. Otherwise the phone supplies a string of meaningless letters. I texted H with a few pathetic and garbled keystrokes, and when it came time to reply the most I could manage was a "yo." Having the clerk explain before I left the store would have been a shrewd move.
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Mar 24th, 2014, 02:42 PM
  #42  
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GETTING READY: the books

http://www.amazon.com/London-Life-Ma.../dp/0712349197

London: A Life in Maps, by Peter Whitfield, did for me what London A Biography should have, and a lot more succintly. Or maybe I just like maps. It starts with the earliest settlements, and takes you through the series of traffic congestion relief schemes including tearing down the city gates and building the Euston Road as a bypass. Walking up Ludgate Hill, and another time stumbling upon the Smithfield/ St. Bart's area was so much more of a thrill with this book under my belt.

Also recently having read King Charles II by Antonia Fraser,
http://www.amazon.com/King-Charles-I.../dp/075381403X
a well done page-turner of the kind where you suspect the author has a bit of a crush on the subjectm helped make walks through St.James Park and past the Banqueting Hall more interesting. Not to mention entire rooms at the National Portrait Gallery and the half-naked one of fetching Nell Gwynn.
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Mar 24th, 2014, 03:41 PM
  #43  
 
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Hi Stokebailey,

Still following along. Thanks for the suggestion of Antonia Fraser’s bio of Charles II. Of course, he lived to avenge his father’s death.

One image which I noticed repeatedly (copies at the Crown Jewels, Queen’s Gallery, and entrance to Windsor Castle) was the triple portrait of his father, Charles I, by Van Dyke to be sent to Italy as a study for a Bernini bust. I also enjoyed the BANQUETING HALL, scene of his bloody demise.

http://www.wikigallery.org/.../Tripl...t-of-Charles-I

Does it look familiar?
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Mar 24th, 2014, 05:26 PM
  #44  
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Oh, that's why the triple portrait! Poor man was a fool for art.

I did walk by the Banqueting Hall and saw where Chas I was forced to climb out of the window and onto the chopping block. Oh the indignity not to mention fatality.
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Mar 24th, 2014, 08:47 PM
  #45  
 
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I am really loving your report . . .

I was going to try for lunch at Middle Temple my next time in London - but the women I'm traveling w/ in May aren't really the group that might appreciate it for how special it is

Maybe I can make it later in the year . . .
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Mar 25th, 2014, 01:03 AM
  #46  
 
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>>and, if you want to, you alight -- love that word -- at red lights.<<

Ssssh! You're not supposed to (and in the last few years of open-door buses weren't even then). But a mark of a true Londoner used to be the ability to get on and off a (slowly) moving bus with a certain elegance.

>>ask yourself what kind of personality Queen Mary II must have had for a hospital split to preserve her river view.<<

She was the Queen and the then hospital was her idea, but she was also apparently very popular (especially by contrast with her husband - Protestant war hero he might have been, but he didn't do charm).
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Mar 25th, 2014, 07:34 AM
  #47  
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Ha, Patrick. The young fellow manning an open end of one Routemaster gave me permission to alight at an unapproved stop's curb, and I did it another time without protest. I hope I haven't encouraged anyone in that unsafe but satisfying practice.

Maybe we could go to Middle Temple together sometime, janis. (Though any of my future trips are in laps of the gods.) If too many rowdy or oblivious groups showed up there, they might stop allowing it.
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Mar 25th, 2014, 07:45 AM
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We visited Inner Temple during the Olympics, when it was home to Belgian House. They served Belgian beer in the hall, and frites outside in the garden.
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Mar 25th, 2014, 08:13 AM
  #49  
 
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Wonderful read, stokebailey. I've copied many of your recomendations for my upcoming trip.

Your cornish gerbils cracked me up, annhig!
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Mar 25th, 2014, 10:40 AM
  #50  
 
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>>I hope I haven't encouraged anyone in that unsafe but satisfying practice.<<

Just be careful:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2C-lhy09Lc
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Mar 25th, 2014, 12:44 PM
  #51  
 
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I spotted a Fox the other nite at my local . . but just as I moved in, her husband showed up!
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Mar 25th, 2014, 01:12 PM
  #52  
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Oh, now you've done it.

I've fallen down the Cholmondley-Warner rabbit hole.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toLbQd9uriI
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Mar 25th, 2014, 01:14 PM
  #53  
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You be careful, too, Rich. Lots of dangers out there.
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Mar 25th, 2014, 02:54 PM
  #54  
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And thank you, Tdudette!

PUBS WE LIKED

(Though I can't think of any that we didn't. I tend to be in it for visuals and the atmosphere rather than ale connoisseurship. I do like good pub food.)

H tells me that the Rocket, on Euston Rd., is where RACL students go on Tuesday evenings when pints are £1.50. One place not to go.

I tried to steer clear of chain pubs, though the evening before curtain time at the Coliseum we had a little chunk of time, because it was handy stopped for our halves (cider for H, ale for me) at the Coal Hole on the Strand, a Nicholson's Pub. Beautiful interior.
http://www.nicholsonspubs.co.uk/thec...estrandlondon/

Another chilly early evening we made a special trip to Fleet Street and the Olde Cheshire Cheese, wedging ourselves between the cozy fire in the first bar and a couple of men talking opera stagecraft (indulging in eavesdroopping while H searched for the lavatory). What a fine old pub that is, with a rich odor of centuries. The food looked good, too, and I'd love to go by sometime when peckish. The Canadian barman asked where we were from, sensing someone from his side of the Atlantic, and he told us the details of how he'd gotten the gig. (H has fallen under London's spell and is looking for ways to extend her months there. Does anyone know of an economics internship that pays enough to scrape by in London? I thought not.)

Another evening when in Fitzrovia, we found the Newman Arms. Many have spoken highly of the pies upstairs. H and I sat inside, liked the feeling of the room, would go back.
newmanarms.co.uk

We really like the White Rabbit in Oxford, near the coach station. whatpub.com/pubs/OXF/C-19/white-rabbit-oxford
Home-made soups, good pizza, and homey atmosphere with what appears to be a good town to gown ratio. It's the one UK pub we've visited three times, and after I told the young barman it was my favorite in the world he gave me a very large sample of ale; they have an interesting selection. The evening we lingered over our halves, knowing the X90 runs every 20 minutes, a table full of American students were making themselves obnoxious and dominating the room. I apologized for our country to the woman at the next table, but she excused them because it was Friday night.
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Mar 25th, 2014, 03:24 PM
  #55  
 
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We had a small Fodors GTG at the Coal Hole back in October
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Mar 25th, 2014, 04:12 PM
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"Does anyone know of an economics internship that pays enough to scrape by in London?"

London has quite a few US companies ( particularly Oil Companies ) that sometimes take on Interns. .
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Mar 25th, 2014, 04:37 PM
  #57  
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Ah, thanks Rich. I'll mention that. She tends to be good at landing that sort of thing, once they check out her pizzazz.
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Mar 25th, 2014, 04:59 PM
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Hi Stokebailey,

Still following along. You mentioned “Another chilly early evening we made a special trip to Fleet Street and the Olde Cheshire Cheese, wedging ourselves between the cozy fire…”

I really must drop in there after visiting the SAMUEL JOHNSON HOUSE (museum) nearby. He is one of my favorite London worthies and I know he favored that spot for good ale and conversation.

Best of luck to your daughter - she sounds like a very accomplished and enterprising young woman.

Janisj, sorry I won’t be in London for your next FGT. The Coal Hole sounds like fun. I expect to go in June but will watch for your later trip report.

Always so much to do an see in London…
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Mar 25th, 2014, 06:06 PM
  #59  
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Thanks, Lateday.
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Mar 25th, 2014, 08:18 PM
  #60  
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Another pleasant bar/cafe is Coco Momo on Marylebone High St at Paddington St.

H is a good traveling companion because she's flexible but decisive. Unlike when her sister and I travel, and spend valuable time trying to read each others' minds about what the other really wants to do. I would selfishly rather she came home for the summer.

I never quite get up the nerve to try for a GTG.
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