Visas to enter Turkey - cost?

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Jul 16th, 2010, 12:30 PM
  #1
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Visas to enter Turkey - cost?

Hi we are 3 Canadians and 1 American - we will come into Turkey via boat from Samos Greece. Does anyone know what the charge for a visa is for a few days?
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Jul 16th, 2010, 12:48 PM
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Canada passport €45 / US$60
US passport €15 / US$20
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Jul 16th, 2010, 01:50 PM
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Yes, you pay for your visa (in cash only, no coins and in US$ or euro, and in exact money) when you disembark from your ferry. Just go to a kiosk with a large VISA sign on it.

For others who are coming on a shore excursion from their cruise liner and returning to their boat for the night, no visa is needed - your purser will hand you a landing permit which exempts you from obtaining a visa. But if you are staying a night or more on shore, visa will be required.
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Jul 16th, 2010, 02:22 PM
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I believe that the visa can be purchased with Turkish currency, but will an ATM be available?
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Jul 16th, 2010, 02:26 PM
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No it cannot, Euro, US$ and sometimes sterling only.
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Jul 16th, 2010, 04:30 PM
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Euro, US$ and sometimes sterling only.

I find it difficult to believe that they would send back a tourist who did not have that currency. I am under the distinct impression that a Danish woman on our flight had a problem because she had neither of these currencies and no ATMs were available before going through passport control (that was in the airport on the Asian side of Istanbul).
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Jul 16th, 2010, 04:42 PM
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They may make an exception on such cases, but the general rule is that visas must be paid in those given currencies only. To avoid any possible delay or hassle, carry the required currency in correct denomination.
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Jul 16th, 2010, 04:48 PM
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I did not think Denmark citizens were required to get Visas for Turkey. Have they changed the rules on the EU countries or was I just confused.
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Jul 16th, 2010, 04:50 PM
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I might be mistaken on the nationality, but not on the problem. Agreed, it is safer to have the proper amount in the designated currencies.
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Jul 16th, 2010, 04:54 PM
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Probably a way for the country to get foreign reserves. They are not trying to be 'difficult'
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Jul 16th, 2010, 05:30 PM
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'I did not think Denmark citizens were required to get Visas for Turkey. Have they changed the rules on the EU countries or was I just confused.'

Certain nationals are exempt from visa requirements for tourist stay (usually up to 90 days) because of reciprocal agreements - not all EU countries are exempt. In Europe, passport holders from Denmark, Germany, Sweden, Finland, France, Italy, Greece and Switzerland are exempt, among others. Outside Europe, Japan, NZ, Singapore, PNG, Argentina and Brazil have visa-waiver agreements, among others.
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Jul 17th, 2010, 02:51 AM
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Michel_Paris, we pay anywhere from 50 to 300 Euros for our Schengen visas to European countries.

"Maybe it is a way (for these countries) to get foreign reserves"

And, we cannot get them at the airports. And we have to pay with exact currency, no coins, only euros (Pounds for UK) (USD for United States) and Turkish Lira.

What it boils down to is that, Turkey wants more foreign tourists and business men and students to come and european countries do not want Turkish tourists, business men and students. "If they really wish to visit germany, france, italy,etc. let us push them to the limit and see what happens.

My 25 year old married daughter with a Master's degree from a prestigious American university, was sent back from the French consulate, last month, to bring her father's bank statement the next day, even though she showed them her paid reservations at two chateaus in languedoc and return ticket to chicago.

Therefore, there is absolutely no reciprocity, just racism and bigotry in this type of international relations.

By the way, i find the American approach to visas much better, laudable, straightforward and even handed, followed by the British, although the British visa is atrociously expensive.

Canadian visa is harder for Turks and take too long, and that may be why Canadians have to pay more for a Turkish visa.

Most Asian countries and russia do not require visas from turks.

Possibly this is because the europeans will prefer that Turkey joins an economic and political union with russia and some asian countries rather than Europe!!!, in spite of the United States efforts to the contrary.
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Jul 17th, 2010, 03:34 AM
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"because the europeans will prefer that Turkey joins an economic and political union with russia and some asian countries rather than Europe...in spite of the United States efforts to the contrary."

When did Russia offer Turkey:
- unrestricted access for its citizens to live and work in Russia
- unrestricted access to free medical treatment, unemployment benefit and all the rest of the world's most far-reaching welfare system
- more MPs in a federal Turkish/Russian parliament than any Russian republic
- subsidised university places, and
- agricultural subsidies.

Because when most citizens of the EU oppose Turkish membership, that's what they're opposing giving Turkey.

Turkey's already got easier access to European markets than any other country in the world has to any other rich country (Mexicans would kill to get the market access to the US that Turkey has to Europe. Show me a Mexican truck delivering Mexican goods in California, for example). And no-one, absolutely no-one, is offering Turkey what Turkey's already getting from Europe.

When the US gives Mexico the privileges EU membership would confer on Turkey, America's views on Turlkish membership might - just might - be worth listening to. Until then, America's outrageous hypocrisy in lecturing us on the subject is simply beneath contempt.

And Turkey might have the courtesy to give us one good reason why we should let it in. Whining about racism might make Turks feel better: but it's not an argument
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Jul 17th, 2010, 03:39 AM
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hear hear
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Jul 17th, 2010, 11:56 AM
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I will be traveling to Istanbul in September - from Canada. I have both my Canadian and British passports. I am a planner by nature, and am a little worried about getting the visa once in Turkey. Will there be a problem? And from what I have researched, I should use my UK passport to obtain the VISA as it will be less expensive. Am I correct with this assumption?
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Jul 17th, 2010, 12:12 PM
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Yes, just produce your British passport at the visa counter, with £10 in English banknote (cheaper than $20 or 15 euro). Without looking at anything, they will place a sticker and collect your money. Then at passport control they will stamp it, allowing you to stay up to 90 days.
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Jul 17th, 2010, 12:57 PM
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sharmon, I visited Turkey nearly 3 years ago. I also have both a British and Canadian passport. I paid 10 pounds, I also brought some US$ as a backup. I am going again at the end of August and will do the same thing. DH is Canadian only so he will have to pay US$60. It is a very fast process, you just hand over the passport and cash and they put a stamp in the passport.
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