US AARP discounts in Europe

Jul 19th, 2017, 02:09 PM
  #1  
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US AARP discounts in Europe

Do seniors find it worthwhile to join AARP to receive travel discounts in Europe or can one just show their residency card or passport at the venue ?
ticadonnita is offline  
Jul 19th, 2017, 02:22 PM
  #2  
 
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What discounts are you referring to? Discounts are often for EU residents only.
MmePerdu is online now  
Jul 19th, 2017, 02:28 PM
  #3  
 
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Many museums and such do offer concessions (discounted entry fees) for seniors no matter their country of residency. Nothing to do w/ AARP.

But except for maybe American chain hotels I can't imagine there are any/many AARP discounts in Europe.
janisj is online now  
Jul 19th, 2017, 02:36 PM
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If you book a US chain hotel in Europe online, you can select AARP or AAA discountiff you belong to either group. Other hotels in foreign countries wouldn't recognize them,. Other than staying at a US chain hotel at an airport abroad, I would not recommend that you book them if you want a European experience.
HappyTrvlr is offline  
Jul 19th, 2017, 02:37 PM
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And leave your Discover Card at home too!
PalenQ is offline  
Jul 19th, 2017, 02:57 PM
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Let's put it this way, European countries do not have discounts specifically for American members of the American Association of Rickety Persons. That said, your membership could constitute some evidence that you're a senior to obtain discounts at sites that offer them to oldies.

The notion that you should not book a US chain hotel "if you want a European experience" is basically either insulting or ridiculous. The fact is, neither Ibis nor K&K nor the various Accor brands necessarily provide a "European experience." That can be found at small family run hotels that could be great or could be crap. Of course, if you think "European experience" means overpriced small room without airconditioning, that lacks whatever virtue HappyT was trying to wring out of the phrase.
BigRuss is offline  
Jul 19th, 2017, 03:04 PM
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That said, your membership could constitute some evidence that you're a senior to obtain discounts at sites that offer them to oldies.>

nothing beats a passport for that - and anyone over 55 or so can be an AARP member.

I vehemently agree with BigRuss about chain hotels - ACCOR once was the biggest hotel chain in the world - even owning U.S. chains and their European hotels are very popular with Europeans -I guess who want an American experience?

I often stay in Etap hotels - an ACCOR brand because they are cheap compared to regular hotels and thoroughly modern.
PalenQ is offline  
Jul 19th, 2017, 03:27 PM
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Where does she say "hotels"?
MmePerdu is online now  
Jul 19th, 2017, 03:28 PM
  #9  
 
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If there are discounts for seniors available, it would have nothing to do with being a member of AARP since that is a organization in the USA.
suze is online now  
Jul 19th, 2017, 03:35 PM
  #10  
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Thank you for replies. I DO want the European experience. I have lived in Costa Rica for 15 years and have a residency card from here and my US passport.
So far, I have booked less expensive boutique hotels and airbnb for sleeping. Saw something from a Copenhagen tourist site about AARP discounts at a museum.... Does not really make sense and it would cost me $17 to join . I don't see myself in the States that much where I could use the AARP card anyway.
Thanks
ticadonnita is offline  
Jul 19th, 2017, 04:06 PM
  #12  
 
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The Copenhagen offer seems to me to underscore the fact that many senior discounts offered in Europe specify EU residents only and that this may be a way to add a few Americans to those eligible. But I suspect there won't be many such opportunities. Have a look on the AARP website for possibilities.
MmePerdu is online now  
Jul 19th, 2017, 04:13 PM
  #13  
 
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That said, your membership could constitute some evidence that you're a senior to obtain discounts at sites that offer them to oldies.


Date of birth on the passport will do just as well.

As for Denmark, we just spent three weeks in the country. Most of the time, where senior discounts were offered we qualified even though we are not EU residents.
Michael is online now  
Jul 19th, 2017, 04:23 PM
  #14  
 
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There are no age restrictions on joining AARP, so a membership card will prove nothing. A passport or drivers license will establish your eligibility for Senior pricing.
travelhorizons is offline  
Jul 19th, 2017, 08:47 PM
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Almost every place we visited in Ireland recently offered discounts for seniors. The only proof you'd probably require is a passport or other photo ID with your birthdate.
bettyk is offline  
Jul 19th, 2017, 09:08 PM
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You can buy a senior rail card in the UK for 1/3 off many fares, if you're going to the UK and will use it enough to make it pay for itself. £30. https://www.railcard.co.uk/?nreTrack=railcards
MmePerdu is online now  
Jul 20th, 2017, 12:26 AM
  #17  
 
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AAA offers discounts in Europe under the ARC Show Your Card scheme. The Dutch version ANWB offers them too. We used our Dutch card a lot in the US. If you go to your AAA website you can find what discounts are available to you in the countries you are visiting.

There are often senior discounts regardless, but not always, and the age from which they are offered varies per country.

The Netherlands is very stingy with seniors discounts.
hetismij2 is offline  
Jul 20th, 2017, 01:43 AM
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""The Netherlands is very stingy with seniors discounts."

I suspect the real Dutch would explain their philosophy differently.

Being generally socially aware, their older citizens do not share their English-speaking peers' selfish determination to be given privileges denied to younger, poorer people with bills to pay and children to feed.
flanneruk is offline  
Jul 20th, 2017, 02:22 AM
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No Flanner, the Dutch are just mean. Notoriously so. Ask any Belgian .
hetismij2 is offline  
Jul 20th, 2017, 04:53 AM
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heti you beat me to it

where's "what" for that joke
bilboburgler is offline  

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