Top Ten In Scotland

Old Aug 2nd, 2005, 05:01 PM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 359
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Top Ten In Scotland

This is for Melissa who asked on another thread for my best place in Scotland. I said it wasnít fair to ask me to pick one place but Iíd have a go at a top ten. These are my suggestions. In my own defence Iíd like to say that there are some world class places I havenít listed because I havenít been there yet - Orkney, Shetland and the southern Hebrides (North & South Uist, Barra, Benbecula) for example. Other places such as the South West I visited so long ago that the details are a bit vague. Thereís also an inevitable bias towards places within a day trip of where I live as these are the places I will have visited lots of times. Feel free to offer as many other candidates for a top ten as you want (letís face it, could I stop you if I wanted to?) - if we finish with a hundred unmissable places rather than just ten, maybe ten times as many people will come to Scotland to see for themselves.
1 - Best place overall has to be the north west highlands, especially the coastal strip from Gairloch to Lochinver. The sea is more shades of blue than you thought possible, the air is so clear you can see for ever, and you could easily go through several rolls of film per day. Between Ullapool and Lochinver the only road heads inland to a landscape like no other, isolated peaks rising sheer out of the moorland.
2- The Isle of Gigha just off the south west coast is something special. This is partly because of its recent history. After appalling treatment from their last landowner, when the island came up for sale the locals formed their own charitable trust and bought the island. An energetic person could walk round the island in a day but it has lots of hidden corners waiting to be discovered. The only hotel serves good food and has a very friendly pub, the only shop will sell everything you need for a self catering (vacation rental) stay, and if you can see two cars driving at the same time it counts as a traffic jam.
3 - The Isle of Lewis. Avoid the temptation to "do" the island in a day and move on, you need to spend longer to really absorb the atmosphere. The beach at Uig (not to be confused with Uig on Skye) will blow your mind. Iím reliably informed that the beach at Luskentyre on the Isle of Harris is even better but Iíve never been there (yet). At Uig they found a huge hoard of carved chess pieces of Norse origin, dating from about the 11th century. Theyíre in the National Museum in Edinburgh despite calls from some locals to send them back to Lewis.
4 - While youíre on Lewis, and no apologies for giving this a place on its own, most awesome historical sites are the broch (ancient stone tower, probably defensive) at Carloway, and the standing stones at Callanish. Go to Carloway first, have a good look at the broch, marvel that it has stood there for at least 2,000 years - then look at the Callanish stones on the horizon and try to get your head round the fact that they were over 2,000 years old when the Carloway broch was built. Iím not going to get into the argument about whether Callanish is better than Stonehenge in England, but itís definitely in the same league.
5 - Oh dear, number 5 already and despite having lived near the east coast for over 20 years thereís a wee bit of a bias towards the west coast so far. Number 5 is the coast of Fife from Leven to St Andrews. My favourite stretch of all is from Largo to Elie. Just south of Elie the coastal footpath climbs several hundred feet up above some cliffs, and on a sunny day the view back over the golf course, village and sea is unforgettable. Earlsferry (the next village to Elie) has a very special pub which does great beer and good food. Golfers will rightly head for St Andrews; while youíre there, check out the beach walks north and south (or both?) of the town. Caution - if you head north along the West Sands (along the edge of the Old Course), stay near the top of the beach when you approach the mouth of the River Eden, unless you have checked the tide times - the tide goes out (and comes back in!) a long, long way and every year somebody gets stranded and they have to send out a lifeboat. Stay close to the top of the beach and youíll be perfectly safe. When you reach the Eden you are almost guaranteed to see seals (Iím convinced they all pop up for a look at these strange human creatures).
6 - For something different from all these island and coastal marvels, try Perthshire. In terms of worldwide fame most of its attractions are maybe not too well known, but taken together they definitely deserve a day or two of your holiday. Scone Palace (pronounced Scoon) is the ancient coronation place of Scots kings and queens, the Stone of Scone (Stone of Destiny) now being safely back in Scotland after being stolen from us in the 14th century (it came home briefly in the 1950ís after being liberated from London). Unless of course you believe the very persistent story that Edward of England got fobbed off with a fake and the real stone is safely hidden away, waiting for the great day. Perth itself is one of our smaller cities but has a terrific setting beside the River Tay. There are still lots of independent local shops waiting to be discovered if you go a few minutes walk from the main shopping centre. A brand new and very impressive looking concert hall is being built. Perthshire has played an important part in the history of forestry in Scotland and has marketed this very cleverly by calling itself "Big Tree Country". Near Blairgowrie is the biggest beech hedge in Britain / Europe / Solar System depending on which record book you believe; Fortingall, a tiny village near the incomparable Glen Lyon, has a Yew tree which could well be the oldest living thing in Europe (it also claims, optimistically, to be the birthplace of Pontious Pilate, not sure if thatís something to boast about); the Hermitage near Dunkeld has a Douglas Fir which is one of two contenders for tallest living thing in the UK; in the grounds of Dunkeld House Hotel are some of the first larch trees ever grown in Scotland (if the hotel itself is within your budget, go there - ask for the Study / Library bedroom or one similar). Pitlochry, Crieff, Aberfeldy are all good towns for an hour or two of wandering; Pitlochry can be a bit over touristy but is redeemed by having the Moulin Inn a mile or so up the hill. For the more energetic, Perthshireís hills are for the most part less well known than some, but they have a magical atmosphere all of their own.
7 - Sea cliffs. There are some mind blowing cliffs around our coast. Unless youíre a real enthusiast you wonít want to visit them all, but wherever you are there will be at least one within a day trip. St Abbís Head in the south east, near the English border; just past Arbroath further up the east coast; Waternish Point in north west Skye, just a few that come immediately to mind. Iíve said nice things about the Cliffs of Moher in Ireland on several threads; any one of these will be just as breathtaking, with about one hundredth of the crowds.
8 - Forth Bridges. NB for the anoraks - the correct names are the Forth Road Bridge and the Forth Bridge; the "rail bridge" was the only one for about 80 years, so after being "The Forth Bridge" for so long she deserves to keep the title for the rest of her days. We maybe take these for granted as we see them every day, but the combination of uncompromising 19th century strength alongside the elegance of the 1960ís road bridge is a bit special. You get a good view of either when you cross the other (unless youíre driving) but to see them both to advantage drive along the south Fife coast road from Kirkcaldy towards Inverkeithing and stop at any of the roadside parking areas. Thereís also a big car park and viewing area off the A904 road on the south side (west of the bridges). Some of the signposted viewpoints closer to one or other bridge are actually too close to really see them, though they leave you in no doubt about the huge scale of both (they were both the biggest of their type in the world when they were built). While in the area, South Queensferry has some wonderful places to eat; arrive early on a nice summer evening, walk along the waterfront and take your pick of restaurants.
9 - Best nature watching experiences. OK, this is cheating as itís not a single place but hey, I make up the rules as I go along. Ospreys at Vane Farm (Loch Leven) in Kinross-shire, Loch Oí The Lowes near Dunkeld, Loch Garten in Inverness-shire, Spey Bay on the Moray Firth; Otters at Kylerhea on Skye (take the teeny wee ferry from Glenelg on the mainland - watch out for dolphins & porpoises on the way across); Dolphins in the Moray Firth - North Kessock and Chanonry Point are the best places; Red Kites on the Black Isle north of Inverness; White Tailed Sea Eagles on Mull; Gannets nesting on the Bass Rock off East Lothian; almost anywhere out of earshot of traffic and town noises, just stand still and listen....
10 - Best first impressions. If youíre coming by road from England, take the detour by the A68 road from Newcastle on Tyne to Jedburgh. Itís slower than the main M6 / M74 to the west or the A1 up the east coast, but the scenery unfolds and unfolds with wonderful effect until you pass the flag on the border - the first time I drove this road I nearly had an accident because I instinctively took my hands off the wheel and cheered. By air, if you fly into Edinburgh pray for a south wind and theyíll probably take you past the airport, circle the Firth of Forth, over the Forth Bridges, and down; flying into Glasgow if youíre very good you might be allowed to "stack" while Air Traffic Control finds a landing slot for you - this involves at least one circuit along the very edge of the highlands in perfect weather (of course!) and youíll be pleading for another go when the nasty old pilot announces that theyíre going to land the plane. To be really different, take the Superfast ferry from Zeebrugge in Belgium. Itís an overnight crossing so you wake up just in time to see Edinburgh and the Lothians on the left (port, as seafaring chaps call it), Godís own Kingdom of Fife to starboard, you sail right under the Forth Bridges with perhaps just a tiny peek at Ben Lomond and other mountains as you pull in to dock at Rosyth.
11 - (Come on, who doesnít think their own homeland is worth 11 out of 10?). Best things about a holiday in Scotland. (1) planning it. (2) doing it. (3) planning the next one.
PS They made me post this under United Kingdom as they don't have a Scotland one yet
Craigellachie is offline  
Old Aug 4th, 2005, 12:18 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 3,254
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Craigellachie, you did it! Thanks for the top 11 of Scotland! I'm printing this out and it's the start of my Scotland file. NO FAIR that there isn't a separate section for Scotland!

I have always wanted to visit Scotland and I am even more attracted now that you have told me it sounds less crowded with visitors than Ireland is. I know I will love Ireland (my Irish grandmother came from Ireland so it's in my blood to love it), but it's also great fun to find beautiful places that are less crowded with visitors!

Okay, I am quite charmed by this teeny wee ferry you mentioned. Is a "teeny wee" ferry even smaller than a "wee" ferry?

How old do you think the oldest Yew in Europe is? The one that Scotland claims to have? That possibility alone might be enough to lure biologist hubby to Scotland. Plus, you have listed the Best nature watching! Biologist heaven!

Do you have a favorite castle in Scotland?

Thanks so much!
Melissa5 is offline  
Old Aug 4th, 2005, 01:36 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,282
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
No city experiences ? (Not an outdoors type myself )
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Old Aug 4th, 2005, 09:09 AM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 6,117
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This is wonderful! I'm printing it out for my file. The five days we once spent in Scotland was only enough to whet the interest. Topping to see if anyone has additions.
hopingtotravel is offline  
Old Aug 4th, 2005, 09:26 AM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 662
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thank you so much for posting such invaluable information! I'm in the very initial fact-gathering stage for a first trip to Scotland (Fall 2006) and am copying this into my notes.

Thanks for taking the time to share this.
Chicago_Heather is offline  
Old Aug 4th, 2005, 01:25 PM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 8,156
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Craigellachie, my 10 would not be very different from yours.

My "pet" island is Islay, the Queen of the Hebrides. I've sailed past Gigha many times en route, but never landed. I have a friend who thinks that everyone loves their "first" Hebridean island and so it was for me.

I've not been onto Lewis or Harris but I adore Coll, and Tiree, partly for those wildlife things you mention.

My husband is heavily into pre-history so I would throw in Kilmartin Glen with its Pictish past; and Abernethy on Seyside is magical at dusk and dawn in springtime with roding woodcock and lecking Black Grouse and Capercaillie.

Thinking quite deeply about this, there are lots of places in Scotland where the best makes an enemy of the good.
sheila is offline  
Old Aug 5th, 2005, 11:42 AM
  #7  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 359
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks everyone for your responses to date. Dealing with the questions in order of posting -
Melissa - I wouldn't want to suggest that Scotland is always less crowded than Ireland. I made the comparison with the Cliffs of Moher from personal experience, but remember this is one the the best known attractions in Ireland so it's maybe not fair to compare it with somewhere at the furthest corner of one of our islands.
Teeny wee (or wee teeny in some places) is definitely smaller than plain wee, and about the same size as wee toaty (variable spelling). Note that these are all relative - a wee teeny ferry for example is bigger than a muckle great mouse. Measurements also vary with location. A wee whisky in certain pubs will hardly wet the bottom of the glass, a wee whisky in the home of a hospitable Scot will be enough to have a bath in.
I've seen various estimates of the age of the Fortingall Yew, most put it at around 3,000 years though some suggest it's older.
Favourite castle - not really my scene but hopefully someone else will pick this one up.
Caroline - no cities? I did give a wee plug for the Fair City of Perth... I could say a lot of good things about most of our cities (even unfashionable places like Dundee) but I honestly wouldn't choose any of them ahead of the places I listed. I also tried to avoid the most obvious and well known tourist destinations as Melissa had asked for places that weren't in the guide books - OK, I compromised and named some famous places. Sorry.
Sheila - never been to Islay but guess which islad we are trying to book a late summer holiday on right now! Spooky or what? (PS any tips for self catering accommodation?) A well travelled person could easily fill all top ten spots with Scottish islands and the only problem would be which ones to leave out. I wouldn't argue against including Kilmartin Glen especially if you added all the other ancient historical sites nearby (Dunadd for example). BTW I'm sure I've read something by a respected historian who said that the "Picts" never called themselves by this name, it was an early version of a racist insult used by the Romans. Abernethy on Speyside would get a place on the reserve list at any time of day, and although I've never been there at dawn or dusk I can imagine that it's even more special then.
Still working on those top ten tips - hope to post in a day or two.
Craigellachie is offline  
Old Aug 5th, 2005, 11:51 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 8,156
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Craigellachie; I've done an Islay preview for another Fodorite which runs to some pages and I'll easily email to you. Though I say it myself who shouldn't, it's pretty good.

As to S/C accommodation it depends on budget and location (hard to think about their being locational choices on an island the size of Islay, isn't it). Do you have views on either? As an afficionada on booking for groups, I doubt there's a place on the island I don't know.
sheila is offline  
Old Aug 5th, 2005, 04:53 PM
  #9  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,951
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
my favorite Scottish Castle (perhaps my favorite anywhere) is Threave Castle. I've mentoined it several times so do a search to find more info.
bigtyke is offline  
Old Aug 8th, 2005, 04:04 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 173
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Can I add just a couple more - I love Lochinver... especially the drive North towards Kylesku, and just thinking about it makes me want to head up there (with a nice meal at the Albannach). Sorry, most of mine are more outdoorsy...

Here's one - The Quirang, on a clear day, having hiked around to the old man and seeing the whole mountain chain on the mainland stretched out in front of you... with a nice cup of tea afterward at the Flodigarry...

Boring but true... the drive through Glen Coe with Kinloch Rannoch either before or after, never ceases to awe...

Coming back to eat a wonderful meal at the Waterfront in Oban, after having spent the day out visiting with the puffins in the Treshnish... (or coming back to a fine meal at any of the many wonderful restaurants in Scotland after a day's hike...)

And here's a nice one, not as spectacular as some of the others, but still nice and not as outdoorsy - enjoying a nice day in Pitlochry when the theatre festival is on, or if not then, having a nice meal then wandering down to the River Tummel to have a drink at dusk and watch the salmon jumping in the river...

ahhh... I could go on... but must get back to work...
trvlgrl is offline  
Old Aug 8th, 2005, 05:52 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 299
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Whilst agreeing with most of Craigellachie's list, and without getting drawn into comparisons, I'd like to suggest a few more places, from my neck of the woods, for your consideration, delectation and delight [in no particular order]
1. Sweetheart Abbey, in the village of New Abbey, for the romantics among you. Built by the Lady Devorgilla in memory of her husband John Balliol [she also built Balliol College, Oxford, and Devorgilla Bridge, Dunfries] in the late 13th /early 14th Century, she lies buried in the presbytery with a casket containing her husband's embalmed heart.
2. Burns House Museum, Dumfries. The home of the man himself and his wife Jean Armour as it would have been. Other Burns sights in the town are his Mausoleum in St Michaels Churchyard, the window in the upstairs snug of the Globe Inn where he scratched the opening verse of Scots Wha Hae with a diamond ring, and the Robert Burns Visitor Centre.
3. Dumfries Burgh Museum, mainly for the Camera Obscura, one of very few such machines still extant.
4. For our American cousins, John Paul Jones' Cottage Museum, Arbigland - see the home of the founder of the US Navy, with audiovisual displays.
5. For those with a taste for obscure Scottish adventure stories, The Raiders' Road is a must. A 10 mile stretch of forest road immortalised (?) by S R Crockett in "The Raiders". Before/after [depending on direction of travel] stop off at Clatteringshaws Loch, with a stunning view, as well as its visitor centre, with iron age relics and Bruce's Stone (remember the Scottish Wars of Independence raged all over this area)
6. Caerlaverock Castle. The atmospheric ruins of this unique 13th Century stone enclosure fortress are a must for any castle nut [like me!]
The above is only a taster, there's lots more to see and do in Galloway - the forgotten Scotland.
doonhamer is offline  
Old Aug 8th, 2005, 06:53 AM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,282
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
OK, here's mine

1. Seeing Scottish Opera at the Edinburgh Festival Theatre - ideally performing Wagner's 'Ring'.

2. Seeing something really amazing and unique at the Edinburgh International Festival or the Fringe.

3. Eating the surprise tasting menu at Restaurant Martin Wishart.

4. Going on an 'art crawl' of Edinburgh's independent art galleries and artist-run spaces.

5. Sitting in Charlotte Square with a glass of wine on a warm afternoon during the Edinburgh Book Festival.

6. The new Parliament building.

7. Charles Jencks's Landform at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, on a sunny day or in the snow.

8. Strolling round the New Town on a winter's late afternoon when the lights are going on and having a nosy in at people's houses.

9. Sitting on the top deck of a bus going down the Mound on a winter's afternoon as the sun is setting over the West End skyline.

10. Talking to funny drunks in a really good pub like the Port O'Leith.
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Old Aug 24th, 2005, 04:01 PM
  #13  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 359
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Does anyone know what happened here? I posted reply to this thread on 12 August but it never appeared on my screen when I checked the page a few days later. Now when I go back to try and remember what I wrote I find my reply is already there - but I can only see it when I go to the "post reply" page. Have I done something silly the first time I tried to post it?
Craigellachie is offline  
Old Aug 25th, 2005, 02:28 AM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,282
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hi Craig. Don't know what happened. When I try to post a reply I can't see yours.
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Old Aug 25th, 2005, 02:27 PM
  #15  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 359
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This is what I tried to post on 12 August; I still see it when I open the "post reply" page, in fact I've just copied and pasted the whole text in here. So I'm flumoxed as to why other people couldn't see it. I don't suppose it's magic and can only be seen by the one true heir to the Scottish throne? Ah well, it was worth a try. Here's the message-

Trvlgrl,
No objection to Lochinver and surrounding area being included. The whole Torridon / Assynt / Coigeach area is beyond comparison and head & shoulders above anywhere else I've ever seen. If it had been "perm any ten from 100" the north west would have had at least 10 candidates.
If the meal on the seafront at Oban consists of prawns so fresh the sea water has barely dried (or raw oysters for the brave), I'm with you 100%. Failing which, the mussels in the Harbour Inn are a close second.
As for Pitlochry, agreed the theatre has a setting to match any, but who wants to be indoors when you could be outside enjoying typical(?!?) Scottish summer weather? Surely the best day spent from Pitlochry is to climb Ben Vrackie (from Killiecrankie if you're feeling adventurous). Right on the edge of the highlands it gives an unbeatable contrast of views between the fertile Strath Tay to the south and the wildest of wild places to the north. If the sun is shining (as it always is), a swim in the disused reservoir is a must on the way down. There are usually too many people about to swim as nature intended ;-) but a brief dook in clear cold water after a day on the hill is one of life's greatest pleasures. The walk back down to Pitlochry takes you past the Moulin Inn, except it would be an act of sheer barbarism to go PAST without calling in. A view to match any, an Olympic size swimming pool, and one of the best pubs in the country on the way down - it's less than 3,000 feet but I vote for Ben Vrackie to be declared an honorary Munro.

Doonhamer,
I bow to your superior knowledge of our south west. It's been too long since I visited, many happy if somewhat faded memories waiting to be re-activated. Note for watching Fodorites - south west Scotland is a much, much bigger place than you would think from looking at a map. You won't do it in a day. Two or three days absolute minimum, preferably more. If this means you have to extend your stay in Scotland, who's complaining? (Only the English Tourist Board, poor diddums).

Caroline,
An interesting selection with not even the teeniest hint of bias towards Auld Reekie. Intersting to see the Parliament among your choices. OK, the organisation of the building contract (by the UK Government!) was a shambles, but the building itself is a fitting tribute to all of us who worked so hard to make it happen.
Just one quibble on your top ten. You obviously value our cultural heritage, you listed ten top places in and around Edinburgh, and you couldn't find a spot for the last resting place of Robert Fergusson? Burns thought he was the greatest Scots poet of all time, he even raised the money to pay for his tombstone in the Canongate kirkyaird. Any chance you could squeeze him in as number ten and a half?




Craigellachie is offline  
Old Aug 26th, 2005, 03:05 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,282
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hi Craig. "all of us who worked so hard to make it happen" - top man ! Are you able to tell us what your role was ?

Sorry, I've seen the Fergusson statue, and I know I ought to have read him, but I'm afraid I haven't My interests are more in the contemporary arts.

BTW Scottish Opera's 'Death of Klinghoffer' is fantastic - I may go again tomorrow !

Re SW Scotland - we enjoyed searching for the Andy Goldsworth works around his home village of Penpont. I didn't so much enjoy stumbling round a depressing caravan park in Galloway, in the rain and wind, searching for the remains of the Wicker Man

(See, I do get out of Edinburgh occasionally ! Although usually only to go to Glasgow )
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Old Aug 30th, 2005, 03:42 PM
  #17  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 359
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Caroline
"Are you able to tell us what your role was?"
Same as so many others - 20 years of pounding the streets, delivering leaflets, knocking doors, writing letters, standing at shopping centres, trying to waken the sleeping giant. On referendum day I met one lady with her husband (sadly no longer with us) who was almost paralysed but insisted on walking the 400 yards or so to the polling station to cast his vote in person. That's when I knew there could only be one result
Craigellachie is offline  
Old Aug 31st, 2005, 04:38 AM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,282
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Well done, Craig ! Actually when I posted I was thinking you meant you helped make the actual building happen : it was only later I realised you might mean the parliament itself.
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Old Aug 31st, 2005, 06:33 AM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 375
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
When is the best time to travel in Scotland April/May or in October? I am planning a trip to Scotland with my 76 year old mother and she likes the scenic travel vs. city stays.
parisnow is offline  
Old Aug 31st, 2005, 08:05 AM
  #20  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,282
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The weather could be the same in both, i.e. rather cold & grey. But it might be nice in May and the days are much longer. Both should be outside the midge season I think, although you could be unlucky in May if it's warm.
caroline_edinburgh is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:58 AM.