Tipping in the UK

Old Oct 6th, 2014, 10:31 PM
  #141  
 
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>> Where an American would simply say to your face that you are an axxhole which undoubtedly some of those posting here are, the typical Brit resorts instead to 'taking the piss.'<<

There may be scope for a PhD on the impact of such cultural differences on diplomatic styles and their consequences.
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Old Oct 6th, 2014, 11:48 PM
  #142  
 
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LOL, we may a have a contender for the title of "FlannerUSA"
wonderful
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 12:29 AM
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Sorry Bilbo.

That would be FlannerBornIntheUKbutlivinginCanadaandholdingdualn ationality.

Quite a ring to that login.
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 12:52 AM
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" Now all it needs is for every other Brit to learn that it is an antiquated method and move into the 21st century by updating their plumbing to allow them to have mixer taps and stop having to wash their hands in either cold or scalding water."

I really can't believe that you haven't worked out what the plug is for.......You put that in the hole in the bottom of the sink (the plug hole) and then mix the water in the sink to a suitable temperature....Simples. I have the system that was explained in the video and don't see it as a problem, anyway to update my "antiquated" system with combi boiler costs a lot of money that I (and a lot of other people) don't have and on the principle of "if it ain't broke don't fix it" it will stay like that probably until the boiler gives up the ghost.
Not seen so much in commercial premises these days but you still see signs on taps saying "not suitable for drinking" occasionally on tank fed systems, I've no doubt the old type systems will gradually disappear as newer boilers are installed but you've got to appreciate that it's a substantial investment that is usually undertaken when the old system stops working and also the fact the we Brits are not as wealthy as you Yanks.
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 12:59 AM
  #145  
 
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And have other things to think about.
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 01:10 AM
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The North American domestic electrical system?

Sneeze and the appliance plug falls out.
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 01:16 AM
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I feel that I have been transplanted to a parallel and horrific universe. Dulcibella has returned.
Btw, Flanner has something between his ears and a sense of humour.

I'm being dragged down by the vortex in the plug-hole. Americans are very wasteful of water. Californians, in particular should learn to put in the plug
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 01:42 AM
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Sojo is not American, he is a British-born Canadian.

So, by conventional wisdom, he is not wasteful.

By general agreement, however, he is a kiapa.
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 01:58 AM
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"Sojo is not American, he is a British-born Canadian."

His attitude though is neither British or Canadian.
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 06:30 AM
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I'm being dragged down by the vortex in the plug-hole. Americans are very wasteful of water. Californians, in particular should learn to put in the plug>>

and some people need to learn to put a sock in it.
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 06:35 AM
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"I really can't believe that you haven't worked out what the plug is for"

I understand what the plug is for Hooameye. That is for those who wish to dip their hands into water that gets dirtier each time they dip their hands in it. Like taking a bath instead of a shower. When you stand up to get out of the bath, the film of dirt gets up with you. So put in the plug, wash your hands and then wipe the dirt onto your face for a finale.

How many surgeons in a hospital have you seen putting the plug in to wash their hands before performing surgery? I prefer to wash with running water.

I do accept your comment hooameye regarding not being able to afford to change an existing old system. That is understandable, but do you think it is equally understandable if a newer home which is directly on mains water, is built without having isolation valves on the water lines to a sink? Should you have to turn off the water at the stopcock that closes off water to your entire house or should you be able to simply close an isolation valve that for example is on the line going into your combi-boiler if you want to work on the boiler?

"The North American domestic electrical system?"

You mean the 110-120 Volt system that all UK contractors are required to step down their power tools to Dickie? They are required to do so for safety reasons. A shock from a 120volt electric drill won't kill you.

While such protection is required for tradesmen, the general public is not required to have the same protection. To supply 120V to every home costs more money than to supply 240V, it's as simple as that. So the public just have to take their chances on getting shocked to death if they try to change a light fixture.
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 06:40 AM
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Dickie, I hear "the boss" in what you write. May the East Street Band be with you.
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 06:43 AM
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Then there is the issue of 'floors'. If a building has 3 floors(example), why is there never a third floor? How can the second floor in a building be called the first floor? Does 'first' not mean first? Is there an alternative definition for first in UK dictionaries? I can't find one.
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict.../british/first
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 06:59 AM
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Aha, but what if there's a basement? That Californian drought is no joke BTW. Wild animals are starting to come into gardens, desperate for greenery
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Old Oct 7th, 2014, 07:07 AM
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I think the european lower ground, ground, 1st floor up, 2nd floor, etc. makes more sense than the North American version - but then I'm 'bilingual' and seem to cope no matter the system
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