Spanish Medical Providers

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Oct 18th, 2017, 09:57 AM
  #1
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Spanish Medical Providers

A SIL was planning on moving to Madrid. She did her due diligence and completed all the onerous paperwork needed by Spain and then went to finalize health care. Although she filled out the forms well in advance, when she went to pay, she was denied because of a previous condition. She went back and checked the literature and the forms and there was no warning about to refusal of coverage due to pre-existing conditions. So after months of preparation and costs and trying to comply with all the laws and covenants, she cannot move to Spain. She does not want to lie nor fly back to the US for well care. So her dream was shattered.

The health care providers are to blame for their lack of honesty.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 10:28 AM
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Confused....was she denied coverage with insurance based in Spain? for how long a period? I have used GeoBlue on my trips out of the country, and you can get it for extended periods. They do cover you (at least some of the policies) if you have a pre-existing condition.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 11:04 AM
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Confused.
Title is "Spanish Medical Providers" later stating "she was denied because of a previous condition."
So is this a case of an American Health Insurance or a Spanish Health Insurance doing a dirty?

It is normal a health insurance will not cover for any previous illness.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 12:32 PM
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It is a pre-existing condition. In the US, under Obamacare, you cannot be denied healthcare coverage due to a pre-existing condition.

Ribe:

What does a Spaniard do, if they are denied coverage, due to a pre-existing condition?
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Oct 18th, 2017, 06:35 PM
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Many people in the US were denied coverage for pre-existing conditions prior the Affordable Care Act. If this is repealed, US citizens may well be back in the same state. In the past, US citizens with pre-existing conditions often had to pay privately to have those conditions treated but other conditions might have been covered by insurance.

I don't think health care providers are the ones to be blamed but perhaps she did not fully understand the system of health care in Spain. Here is a good site: https://www.expatica.com/es/healthca...in_101467.html and: https://www.expatica.com/nl/healthca...ts_445243.html.

That second link mentions being sure to investigate which pre-existing conditions may or may not be covered.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 08:00 PM
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Ktravel

Did you actually read the sites you posted? The terms could not be much vaguer. My SIL, spent considerable time investigating the requirements and was fully surprised at the last moment. She did all the required steps including being fingerprinted for an FBI background check and the absurd and almost Catch 22 bureaucratic requirements of the Spanish government. She also went on ex-pats boards continually to ask questions and see the experience of others.

The forms she filled in for healthcare coverage and the accompanying literature made no mention of the lethal covenants.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 08:19 PM
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Has she talked to an immigration specialist? She would have to pay, but maybe she could get one to help her jump through this particular hoop. Lincasanova sent me a link to as association of them; let me know if you would like it for your sister, I can post it.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 08:52 PM
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Yes, I did read the sites. I agree they don't specify what exactly would or would not be covered but clearly indicate much research might need to be done, preexisting conditions might be an issue, and that private insurance would likely be necessary. Was she applying for private insurance that was denied or was she hoping to be covered by the state healthcare system?

Not every expat has the same situation, particularly those that have worked or are working in the EU.

I think the idea of speaking with an immigration specialist might be helpful.

As a health care provider, I don't make up the rules about health coverage but try to provide care within our health care system (whose rules are constantly changing.) I am not sure why you think Spanish medical providers are dishonest or should be blamed for the rules of their government.

I do hope your SIL is able to figure out a way to make this dream work for her.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 09:10 PM
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Well, it sounds like there are private companies as well. Did she apply for private or public? The first link makes it sound like you're entitled to public if you're a resident, not as if you have to qualify for it to become a resident. Can she afford to pay out of pocket? Because that sounds like another option. And people are always saying that routine care is much cheaper there than here.


I have mixed feelings about Obamacare. On one hand, it has made it so like your sil, I get insurance. On the other hand, it's so screwed up in some ways that it hasn't actually improved the level of care. I drive 6 hours because I can't actually find a doctor accepting new patients. But at any rate, the way Trump is going, she'll be able to move in a few years because there may be no coverage to stay for. Cheerful thought, that.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 09:50 PM
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I also fail to see the dishonesty.
The guys looking at her file just follow the rules like some did in 42 in Dachau except that these rules have been established under democratic rules so they are legit.
Don't expect these guys to bend the rules or show compassion or even be creative. It is up to your sil to overcome it or accept it.

Maybe it is easier to complain.

I was once confronted to a situation where health guys refused something and I had to fight for it.

Happy travels.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 10:29 PM
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we are not denied health care. We have a similar system to the UK where payments are deducted at income to cover universal/public health care. We have to "contribute" for meds., when purchased at the pharmacy.
I believe that this is considered a bit too left for some US politicians.;-)
One can purchase extra insurance to cover "private" hospital stays extra treatments etc.
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Oct 18th, 2017, 10:51 PM
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Ah. Depends on the visa, I see.

But this source might help:


https://wagonersabroad.com/medical-i...a-application/

Although unfortunately their original path (travel insurance) may no longer be a possibility. But different Spanish companies may have different criteria of pre-existing conditions. Basically, if I were her, I wouldn't give up hope until exhausting all options.
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Oct 19th, 2017, 03:44 AM
  #13
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The guys looking at her file just follow the rules like some did in 42 in Dachau except that these rules have been established under democratic rules so they are legit.
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There were some absurd possibilities such as paying $2,500 a month for health insurance. Or lying about her condition. Or flying back to the US, on occasion, for medical attention assuming nothing major erupted again. She already had a airline ticket, a place to stay while looking for a long term rental. All this after she had hired an expediter and translator to help with the Spanish bureaucracy in the US.

She believes she has exhausted all possibilities. As her father was born in Spain, she could have applied for Spanish citizenship, but she did not want to give up her American citizenship, which is a condition, here in the US.
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Oct 19th, 2017, 04:11 AM
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My understanding is that the USA doesn't recognise dual citizenship, but doesn't force you to give up your American citizenship if you claim citizenship of another country as well unless you want to:

https://travel.state.gov/content/tra...tionality.html

Quote from above website: U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one nationality or another. A U.S. citizen may naturalize in a foreign state without any risk to his or her U.S. citizenship. However, persons who acquire a foreign nationality after age 18 by applying for it may relinquish their U.S. nationality if they wish to do so.
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Oct 19th, 2017, 04:51 AM
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Since the US taxes its citizens on worldwide income regardless of residency (unlike almost every other country in the world), if she plans to live in Spain for good she might be better off renouncing her US citizensip. Even if she owed no tax to the US, filling in the paperwork can be expensive and time consuming. Of course, relinquishing your citizenship can be expensive too, but it is a one-time hit.

In any case, I have no idea why she thinks she cannot hold dual citizenship. It used to be an issue, but there was a Supreme Court case in the 50s that clarified the matter.

https://travel.state.gov/content/tra...tionality.html
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Oct 19th, 2017, 04:56 AM
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If she went ahead with the move and sought health care on an as needed basis, would that not be the same position that a traveler without travel insurance would be in? I always believed that health care was inexpensive in European countries. If this is true, could she not seek the care as needed without bankrupting herself? (I just want to know, I'm not commenting on her decision..)

I'm in Spain now. I bought no insurance. If I had to go to a hospital or see a doctor, would that be as pricey as in the US?
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Oct 19th, 2017, 05:08 AM
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Health insurance may be a requirement of her visa?
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Oct 19th, 2017, 05:32 AM
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Lots of good information on the site marvelousmouse posted.

I previously have always heard health insurance was one of the biggest obstacles/issues to be dealt with in considering an out of country move. Easier, possibly, if she has been offered a position working in the EU. Is she retired or does she plan to be working? Did she apply to more than one private insurance company?
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Oct 19th, 2017, 06:52 AM
  #19
 
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I know lots of people asking the same questions and on an fb page " Valencia Information exchange" I have seen an insurance provider who can help her. I will try to find it for you.
An immigration specialist is not necessary.. i don't think
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Oct 19th, 2017, 07:00 AM
  #20
 
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another group is Americans in Spain, Americans living in Valencia,
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