So what do Europeans make of Dubya?

Old Dec 19th, 2000, 02:37 AM
  #1  
Tracy
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So what do Europeans make of Dubya?

Hey all, <BR> <BR>Other posts have mentioned Europeans' negative opinion of GWB, the prez-elect . . . what do your Euro friends think? My buddies are completely unimpressed! <BR> <BR>Just wondering . . .
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 03:14 AM
  #2  
bob
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Some of my friends from other countries joked at probably getting as much freebie aid money out of GWB. Which will probably be true to a certain degree.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 03:45 AM
  #3  
Chris
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Seems a nice enough guy (but he is a republican so dare say his fascist tendencies will show through soon enough). Just a pity he gives the impression that he'll need help tying his shoe-laces in the morning never mind the fact that he has some of the worst levels of poverty in the developed world to deal with and an economy thats starting to slow down.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 04:56 AM
  #4  
Dimpled Chad
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Europeans are probably frightened at the prospect of a mass migration of Americans to their shores now that Dubya is about to take over.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 05:26 AM
  #5  
hans
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I am just glad Alec Baldwin is leaving.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 05:28 AM
  #6  
Al
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Read the current issue of The Economist of London's cover story, "The Accidental President." Frightening.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 06:05 AM
  #7  
david west
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Couldn't care less to be honest. But one thing does intrigue me. As I understand it, GWB has an MBA from harvard which argues a certain level of intelligence. Gore appears to as thick as two short planks, and has no real academic record (although he did "invent the internet" - actually done by a very quiet british academic). So why is GWB thought of as stupid and Gore as an intellectual?
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 06:29 AM
  #8  
Sjoerd
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Probably, the split Senate and House will mean that his policies will be moderate. But his legacy in Texas is awful if you look at the statistics. And we are all waiting for funny remarks in Reagan and Quayle style. And yes, he really looks as if he is a bit..... ....uhh........retarted in his development.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 07:17 AM
  #9  
John
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We shouln"t care what europe thinks of the USA. They can't even manage their own affairs. They constantly want our help and our dollars. <BR>Tracy and Al, Please buy a one way ticket to that "third world country, Italy" or any other country of your choosing but leave your passport at the door.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 07:18 AM
  #10  
Ivy Leaguer
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Yes, GWB has an undergrad degree from Yale and a Harvard MBA. Al has an undergrad degree from Harvard. Yet GWB is widely considered to be a dim bulb. Why? <BR> <BR>The fact that we ask the question is telling. Many people assume that the fact that a person graduated from a big name school means they must be really smart. Not necessarily. I knew plenty of people at my Ivy League Law school who weren't all that impressive. I wouldn't hire to represent me in an important matter. People of modest intellect sometimes get admitted to Ivy League schools because they attend good prep schools, which help them squeeze every bit of performance out of whatever intellect God gave them. Also, they are often the sons and daughters of alums who contribute to the school. Yes, plenty of bright people go to big name schools, but it isn't a safe assumption that an Ivy League grad must be really smart. <BR> <BR>So Al and GWB perhaps were admitted to their respective big name schools at a time when it was easier to be admitted, and based on what I know about their academic performance, they probably did it with the help of their big name dads and deep pockets. <BR> <BR>Also, I think GWB gets a bad rap because he doesn't do well when compared to others in his profession. When asked a serious question, most prominent pols (even Al Gore) can give a serious, thoughtful answer. (Clinton, regardless of what you think of him, really does this well). GWB can't really do that without being heavily scripted. He's going to have to work hard to overcome this problem, and if Dan Quayle's experience is any guide, it may be impossible.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 07:37 AM
  #11  
american also
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What Europe thinks is very important. To think that it only matters what Americans think is very short sighted. The comment that "Europeans can not manage their own affairs" is one of the most short-sighted comments I have ever heard. (Please don't come back with the comment about WWII because the Aussie's will tell you they saved us in the Pacific/WW11) It is important for the world to feel confident about our president because he has the finger on the button and the US is a strong economic force (along with the EU, Taiwan, China and especially Japan) Only time will tell if when the xxxx hits the fan and the decision process Dubya uses. Will he make the right decision---who knows? I just hope he doesn't get pulled aside and one of his "cold-warrior/father's good buddies" tells him what to do and he just follows instead of weighing all the facts/opionions. That is the true test
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 08:17 AM
  #12  
Gettin'
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Geez. Did anyone catch Bush's joint appearance with Clinton today? Things aren't going too well. They both sat in front of a fireplace and took questions from the press. Bush looked like Clinton's errant teenage son. But setting aside appearances, Bush wasn't able to answer a substantive question with a substantive answer. <BR> <BR>First question to Bush: Mr. President-elect, the public is worried that the country is entering a recession. What do you think about that? <BR> <BR>Answer from Bush: The economy is strong, and I'll answer questions about that in the future. We're going to work on the economy. <BR> <BR>Question to Clinton: What do you think, President Clinton? <BR> <BR>Answer from Clinton: Well, a recession is defined is two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth, and we haven't had that. Nevertheless, it is important to take measured steps to bolster the economy. (And so on and so forth, using detailed facts to explain a complex situation.) While Clinton spoke, Bush looked around the room. <BR> <BR>Bottom line: Bush isn't going to be able to bluff his way through the presidency. Ain't gonna work.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 08:23 AM
  #13  
Ron
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Now, there you go again...
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 08:27 AM
  #14  
janice
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I'm just looking forward to explaining to my friends in France and Italy why the guy with the most votes is NOT the winner of the election...
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 08:29 AM
  #15  
Mark
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Just a bit of clarification: Al Gore never said he invented the internet - what he did "invent" was the phrase "information superhighway" (interview with Al in Yahoo!) <BR>
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 08:39 AM
  #16  
Duhhhhbya
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It is obvious that Bush has only a superficial understanding of the issues. When he was asked about his conversation with Greenspan yesterday he got a blank look on his face and said "you better ask him". Translation: Duhhh, I didn't understand anything Greenspan told me". It is also obvious that Republicans are willing to embrace any dimwit as long as he is from their party. I just hope Dubya can surround himself with smart people and he doesn't attempt to grow a brain. How did McCain lose to this guy?
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 08:46 AM
  #17  
kavey
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Well, personally I do find Bush comes across as particularly ignorant of world affairs. Whilst many Americans may feel the outside world doesnt matter, it really does in today's world. <BR> <BR>We have seen replays of various interviews which show he does not have a grasp of key issues or even know who the key players are. <BR> <BR>Thats not to say Gore comes across as Einstein but he does come across (from the footage I have been watching) as more informed, somewhat more knowledgable and less extremist. <BR> <BR>Officially the UK will support Bush anyway because we always hang on to the US coat tails but I think Europe would have been happier to see Gore in. <BR> <BR>At the end of the day though, I will judge Bush on his actions in office, and we are going to have to wait and see on that front. <BR> <BR>If his advisors are good enough that ought to overcome his own ignorance. <BR> <BR>I personally do come away with the impression he went for it to avenge the fact his dad was thrown out and coz he likes the idea of being top man... <BR>
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 08:53 AM
  #18  
Pleasethink
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Why is Bush portrayed like a fool? I'll give you several insights. First, the media (particularly the comedic media, such as Saturday Night Live) is lazy. Find a hook and stay with it. Hence, GWB is dumb, Al Gore is wooden, Ford is a klutz, etc. I don't blame the comedians: We the people settle for trite humor. Another thing: We are a cynical public. We make fun of those who exceed our own performance. Whether you are a Democrat or Republican, you will show your own ignorance if you actually believe that GWB is ignorant. He is reasonably intelligent and, probably, considerably more intelligent than most of us. How many of us have run for the office of President and won? And don't believe that bologna about him being Ivy League educated but yet is still stupid. That's ridiculous. Granted, he may not be the best public speaker, but intelligence manifests itself in different ways. Ironically, we the public suggest that we do not like silver tongued politicians, but then jump all over someone like Quayle or Bush whose on screen presence is not that of a professional news-anchor. Come on: How many of you consider yourself intelligent, but occasionally make slips of the tongue or are not the most eloquent of public speakers? I know that I fit such a description.
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 08:58 AM
  #19  
maybenot
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I found it interesting during the after-election developments that Bush was portrayed as aloof and hands-off, but Gore was glorified as being hands-on (how many cell phones and computers was he reported to be using at any one time?) However, in the grand scheme of things, Gore's appearance in the aftermath was not very well scripted, calling too many newsconferences (two in two days) and coming up with inconsistent strategies (Let's count every vote, unless you might be in the armed forces....). Bush on the other hand was smart enough to know when to rely on others. I do not think any one person is smart enough to do everything it takes to be President. It would greatly concern me if someone who thought they were that smart occupied the oval office. We all need advice and it is an intelligent person who knows when to seek counsel. <BR>
 
Old Dec 19th, 2000, 09:54 AM
  #20  
Come on
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Bush is only thought to be dumb because of the media and spoofs? That's just way off base. These spoofs have a basis in fact, or they wouldn't take and they wouldn't be funny. Let's face it -- there are some people who can be made out to be lightweights and some who can't. Ken Starr, Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton, Newt Gingrich, Trent Lott . . . The list of people who could NEVER be lampooned as dumb goes on and on. The shoe only fits certain people. <BR> <BR>Also, the fact that Bush can't comment with any specificity on the U.S. economy, the single most important thing to most Americans right now, is kinda scary. <BR> <BR>As for the notion that Bush is smarter than your average person, so that's good enough . . . That's just so lame. The question is whether he is smart enough to be President (among the most demanding, difficult job on the planet), not whether he is smart enough to be your average Joe. I think we could all agree that he is not as sharp as Clinton, Bush Sr., Reagan, Carter, Ford, Nixon, and Kennedy, to name just a few. So we'll soon find out just how low the bar really is.
 

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