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shouldn't alcohol be banned from flights?

shouldn't alcohol be banned from flights?

Jun 9th, 2001, 11:11 PM
  #1  
frank
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shouldn't alcohol be banned from flights?

we have had some uncomfortable flights because of people drinking to excess. The worst one was a flight to Benidorm years ago. There was practically a riot when the stewardesses eventually said no to requests from the by now very drunk passengers. There were people opening duty free, others playing their stereos out loud and loads of swearing.
On a long haul flight it is even worse as passengers can drink for free and many do not realise that alcohol works faster when you are flying.
what do people think? Should alcohol just be banned?
 
Jun 9th, 2001, 11:39 PM
  #2  
Frankly
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Frank:
Where's Benidorm and where were you flying from. Perhaps they should have banned alchohol on that flight years ago. Should we also outlaw alcohol sales in restaurants because a bunch of patrons got drunk and roudy in, for example, Aukland or Zagreb years ago?
 
Jun 9th, 2001, 11:49 PM
  #3  
T Erlsegaard
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Jeeze, I wish I'd been on that flight. Sounds like a party. I don't fly a great deal but I have never experienced any really offensive behavior related to drinking or anything else, though I suppose I'll have to take everybody's word that such atrocities are almost de rigeur in modern air travel. Personally I would be miffed if alcohol were to be banned, since I sort of think of the flight itself as a kind of introductory or farewell party to whatever experience I am embarking on (though I party in a very quiet and self-contained manner, I assure you), and I find the whole event to be great fun which I might not find it as much if I had to drink soda the whole time. Of course I realize that the purpose of flying is not to have fun in that sense and that when these things begin to get out of hand the pillars of society have to act in a sweeping manner, though in this case I am certainly hoping that the poor dears won't do so.
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 12:33 AM
  #4  
carry
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difficult one. Personally I like a drink on the flight although I will limit it to a max of 3. However one puzzling thing is that often when you ask for a drink they give you 2!!(mainly on long haul flights)- isn't that just irresponsible of the flight companies?
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 02:50 AM
  #5  
julie
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yes , ban alcohol!! I'd also start a campaign of banning high fibre foods from airplanes so we can fly in sweeter smelling cabins. I'd also make it compulsory to wear deoderant.
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 03:26 AM
  #6  
Jim Rosenberg
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There are worse things than alcohol. One would be living in an oppressive society, paternalistic society where rules are made to prevent every type of potentially offensive behavior. We come dangerously close to that now, at times. I rarely have a drink on a flight anyway, but incremental prohibition to suit the most thin-skinned among us and then leaving me to pick up the revenue losses with higher ticket prices? No thanks!
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 06:04 AM
  #7  
Rex
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Benidorm is in Spain, south of Valencia.

Ban alcohol on flights? Will it come next to ban alcohol consumption BEFORE the flight? Administer IQ tests? Moral judgment tests? Map-reading tests?

What prompts you to ask this question now, frank, when this incident was "years ago"? If the memory of this one flight still haunts you, and you haven't been back on a plane since, let me assure you that air travel has NOT gotten MORE genteel.

Best wishes,

Rex
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 06:07 AM
  #8  
Bert
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They've already banned peanuts because a couple people might suffer a severe reaction, so why not ban booze? Please also ban first class because those rich people make me feel like a loser.
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 06:33 AM
  #9  
Rex
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Peanuts result in peanut antigens in surprisingly large - - and clinically significant - - quantities in/on the air filters of airplanes, and airborne peanut antigen can and will induce an allergic reaction in sensitized individuals. Peanut allergy is NOT a problem to be taken lightly. Among college students, peanut allergy is the third leading MEDICAL cause of DEATH (excludes trauma, overdose, etc).

Inappropriate human behavior is not a problem to be taken lightly either, but there is no analogous situation - - alcohol passing passively through the air to make another passenger ill, as far as I know.
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 06:55 AM
  #10  
philosopher
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Just a thought, but maybe "banning" is the wrong word. There are restaurants that don't serve alcohol, but I don't think it's accurate to say that they "ban" it - they just don't have any. Maybe it would be appropriate for airplanes not to have any, either; it might solve a problem or two. I'm not sure that the absence of bar service truly impinges on anybody's human rights.
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 07:03 AM
  #11  
z
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What they need to do is to ban people from these flights . . this could be such a nice world if it wern't for the people here!

z
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 07:13 AM
  #12  
Rex
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Many shorter flights in America do not serve alcohol; some serve nothing, some serve nothing to drink, some serve a limited number of pre-poured choices.

I assume that philosopher is talking about intercontinental flights. I just don't think there is a market for alcohol-free intercontinental flights - - but perhaps on flights between predominantly Muslim (Moslem?) - - soory, I think I am exposing my ognorance here - - there already ARE alcohol-free flights. Anyone here ever flown between two countries where alcohol is not readily served? I have flown on Malaysian Airlines but it involved travel to or from Australia or Japan. Would they have served alcohol to Jeddah?
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 07:23 AM
  #13  
DSandy
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I think they should only allow nice people on airplanes
Oh yes and we should ban:
Those with too much carryon luggage
And people who snore
And people who smoke (off of planes) because they smell
And people who eat garlic (cause they sometimes smell too)
And babies because they cry and keep me awake
And people who sleep when I can't
Oh gosh there are so many people we shouldn't allow
How about people who think everything should be legislated?
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 07:44 AM
  #14  
flyer
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No, alcohol does not pass thru the air making passengers ill, but then again drunk people who try to break into the cockpit put EVERYONE at risk. And no one wants to be near a drunk. Even in a BAR they're annoying.

 
Jun 10th, 2001, 07:48 AM
  #15  
firsttimer
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to Sandi
you've found something more annoying than drunks- babies!!!! I always seem to end up close to one that cries all the way. I know it's only natural but its not half irritating!!
and theres the one in front of you who tests the seat recliner to the limit.
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 07:56 AM
  #16  
frank
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to Rex
the Benidorm flight was just an example (the worst one!)
to everyone
you've given me plenty of food for thought.Probably banning alcohol is too drastic but maybe there should be more strict codes of conduct. I still think though that it is up to the stewards to use their discretion on whether someone has had enough. (being loud and using abusive language for example)
Does anyone know what powers the airline has during the flight on things like restraint?
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 09:07 AM
  #17  
Phils
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Frank, I can't see why alcohol HAS to be served on flights. It does have the potential to cause problems with some people. Charter flights charge for it, which probably reduces a lot of peoples intake.

I'm not sure what the "powers" are for the airlines in the air, I think the captain has absolute and final ruling, they can arrest people that are seriously "out-of-order" but perhaps you could "Ask Jeeves" on that one.

 
Jun 10th, 2001, 10:31 AM
  #18  
Buzzy
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Yes alcohol should be banned from flights.
If somone gets violent on a flight the cabin crew are unable to summon outside assistance The passengers including young children can be witness to the worst of human behaviour in such a confined space with no means of escape. Anyone who has been subject to this would not be making a joke out of the situation.
What is the big problem? Can't we survive a few hours on a plane without throwing alcohol down our necks? Once you get to your destination you can drink yourself silly if you want. At least then the police can be summoned if you get out of hand.
Once again the author of this message has been made to feel as if his suggestion is opressive and out of line when in fact it is common sense. My message to him is don't allow people to shake you from your position. Too many liberal ideas and not enough common sense is allowing people to get away with unacceptable behaviour in all walks of life.
I await the backlash from the liberals amongst you. By the way I am a young person,not a religious person and I drink and enjoy alcohol. So you can get rid of those assumtions straight away.
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 10:37 AM
  #19  
Rex
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I disagree with Buzzy.

And I see the counter-perspective as "conservative" (which I consider myself), not "liberal". At least in the US, conservatives want fewer rules, fewer laws, less government, more individual responsibility.

And on intercontinental flights, where dining is normal and expected, alcoholic beverages are an enjoyable part of eating - - most of the world over, and especially in Europe.
 
Jun 10th, 2001, 01:03 PM
  #20  
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