Rouen - Hotel des Carmes

Mar 9th, 2005, 09:53 AM
  #1  
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Rouen - Hotel des Carmes

I have 'read up' on Hotel Cardinal and Hotel de la Cathedrale... I would like to know if anyone can comment on Hotel des Carmes, as it is a few euro less and we are just staying one night.

Hotel des Carmes - 33 place des Carmes
Rooms 42-58€ / Breakfast 6€

It is described by "Jack-Travel" as:
"Love at first sight! In the town centre, near the cathedral, on one of the most animated squares of centre town, very cute hotel, and not luxurious but very good value for money. Staff is young and smiling. Agreeable decorated rooms and wonderful Normandy breakfast with the best products."

Nothing on Tripadvisor or Venere.
Travelnut is offline  
Mar 9th, 2005, 10:29 AM
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Bonjour,

I live close to Rouen but don't really know the hotels downtown... All I can say is that the "critique" in "Le Guide du Routard 2001-2002" is very good and they mention the fact breakfast is good, thanks to the excellent Norman products coming from the best Norman products suppliers... They say "rapport qualité-prix excellent"

Moreover, the "critique" in "Le P'tit Normand 2003-2004) is good too and gives the url of this hotel :

http://www.hoteldescarmes.fr.st/

Voilà ! You'll have to tell us about your point of view Bon séjour dans ma ville qui est très belle ! Marie
Marie007 is offline  
Mar 9th, 2005, 01:26 PM
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Don't know about your hotel but we are staying at a Frommer *find. Hotel Le Vieux Carre

59 euros and they have a restaurant.
loisco is offline  
Mar 9th, 2005, 01:43 PM
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loisco, I saw that one, too, couldn't decide about it...

merci, Marie, for your info and kind wishes...
Travelnut is offline  
Mar 9th, 2005, 04:21 PM
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Well it seemed too good to pass up...will let you know how it works out. I think it's not as centrally located but is in the "center". It's not smack dab in the area of the cathedral. Sounds more like the hotels in Provence frankly.

loisco is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 11:19 AM
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To Loisco :

I love the little restaurant which is also "un salon de thé" in the afternoon called "Le Vieux Carré", the food is very good and the desserts are excellent. This "établissement" is located in a delicious yard which is very small but very pleasant in summer, one can have lunches outside. And it is located in the very centre of Rouen in a nice pedestrian street called "Rue Ganterie" at number 34, close to the commercial centre and the park lot which are just in front of our wonderful Law Courts...

According to the guidebook "Le P'tit Normand", the rooms must be a bit simpler than the ones of the "Hôtel des Carmes" but must be nice. The guidebook "Le Guide du Routard" says that the rooms are quite small (since they are located in an old house)

You'll find a pic of the nice yard on this site :

http://www.normandie-qualite-tourism...tel.php?id=350

Hôtel de Charme de Normandie
Patrick BEAUMONT

34, rue Ganterie
76000 ROUEN
Booking :
Phone : 02 35 71 67 70
Fax : 02 35 71 19 17
Email : [email protected]

And one can see another view of the hotel on this site :

http://www.cybevasion.com/hotels/fra...ouen_7618.html

Voilà ! Bon après-midi ! Marie

Marie007 is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 12:06 PM
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Marie thanks for reinforcing my desire to stay there. It just sounded like better to me than the others. We shall see.

The idea of lunch and dessert in a garden area are enticing. You know we have traveled for years in an rv so I think the small rooms won't bother us as much.

Merci.
loisco is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 02:47 PM
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De rien !

Votre "RV", c'est l'abbréviation d'un "recreational vehicle", n'est-ce pas ? C'est à dire d'un "camping car" ?

Cordialement. Marie qui va aller dormir vu l'heure qu'il est on this side of the pond
Marie007 is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 02:52 PM
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Our rv is 29 feet. Maybe it is called a camping car in Europe. Je ne sais pas.


Je ne comprends pas this sentence:. Marie qui va aller dormir vu l'heure qu'il est on this side of the pond

All I can tell is you are going to sleep..........! help.
loisco is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 03:23 PM
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Marie she has a caravan.
cigalechanta is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 03:27 PM
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Is that what it means?..I thought it means she was sleeping over on a pond! I better get busy with my Pimsleur tapes...
loisco is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 03:29 PM
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Marie who lives in Rouen is going to sleep because of the hour on her side of the pond.
I told Marie, your Vehicle is called a caravan there.
cigalechanta is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 03:31 PM
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If you get stuck behind two of those, you often can't pass and will take twice as much time to reach your destination. They go slowly and drivers curse them.
cigalechanta is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 03:50 PM
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Oh that's right...the ocean is the pond. I forgot. You are pretty fluent Cig. I am studying hard but I guess I need more work.
loisco is offline  
Mar 10th, 2005, 03:52 PM
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Hardly fluent. I find learning very difficult and have add but I can read much better but a long, long way to go.
Marie is a teacher.
cigalechanta is offline  
Mar 11th, 2005, 07:13 AM
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Bonjour Loisco and Mimi

Sorry for using some French last night, I was really exhausted after my working day... But our Mimi did a very good job when she explained to you what I meant

I "discovered the expression "on this side of the pond" in posts written by British friends to American people on American fora and thought it was a lovely expression. I, of course, could say "de ce côté-ci de l'Atlantique"/on this side of the Atlantic Ocean, but find the word "pond" much funnier

Now, about "les caravanes" and "les camping-cars"... I wondered if your rv was "une caravane", id est, a vehicle drawn by a car, etc. or "un camping-car, a vehicle you could drive... You see ? My "dico" (French colloquial abbreviation for "dictionnaire"/dictionary) online gave this :

- rv = "recreational vehicle, RV noun US camping-car m"

And, thanks to this, I saw our "cousins", id est French Canadians" use the expression "autocaravane" which I didn't know so far and find a bit strange... (Must say that French speaking Canadians often reproach us, the Frenchies, for borrowing and using English terms in our everyday lives (for instance : "un weekend", "faire du shopping", etc.) and they coin terms which I find strange, such "magasiner", etc. On the other hand, they tend to use tons of anglicisms without seeming to realize it... Bon, c'était un aparté/it was an aside, désolée/sorry !)

Well, I thought "une caravane" was called "a caravan" in British English and "a trailer" in American English...

Bon après-midi ! Marie



Marie007 is offline  
Mar 11th, 2005, 07:16 AM
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Hum, should have written "such as "magasiner"... I typed too quickly...
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Mar 11th, 2005, 04:13 PM
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It is a camping car!! We are selling it and that is sad as we have had good times in it.

I met a girl who taught French. She is from Quebec. Are you saying her French would be different? I want to take some lessons from her.

loisco is offline  
Mar 12th, 2005, 07:02 AM
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Bonjour Loisco !

My dh and I rented a "camping car" when our children were young (they are now 26 and 22 !!!) and I loved it ! I had the impression of having a lot of freedom then and the ***/**** "terrains de camping"/campsites/campgrounds we chose in Dordogne were very beautiful and clean !

About your choice of a French Canadian person as a French teacher, I have nothing to say against this idea Apart from the fact the accent of this person will be different from the one of a French person and that she is likely to use French Canadian expressions coined (to avoid resorting to English ones) and use "anglicisms" at the same time, you'll improve your French syntax/grammar and will practise your French, which is the main thing/ce qui est la chose la plus importante ! Bon courage ! Marie
Marie007 is offline  
Mar 12th, 2005, 08:46 AM
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We met her in a French cafe here. There is a little area near here with a French wine and cheese shop and this restaurant/cafe. She is a waitress who can't find work here as a French teacher.

I will use her a week or two before we go in September. Meanwhile we eat breakfast there several times a week so I can practice. I am gaining weight. So much for French Women Don't Get Fat.

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