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ROME: 'Ides Of March' Julius Caesar's Assassination Walking Tour

ROME: 'Ides Of March' Julius Caesar's Assassination Walking Tour

Old Mar 1st, 2012, 07:35 PM
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I condensed the assassination site for a post on a history/archaeology messageboard a while back which makes it alot easier to follow.

I believe many archaeologists and historians including Rome's Archaeology Department believe that this is the Curia (Hall) of Pompey.


I've been posting about the Curia's location on European travel messageboards since ~'98 and in ~2004/5 the City of Rome finally put up plaques all around this 1 block site which makes it alot easier to find.

These plaques have this EXCAVATION DIAGRAM http://tinyurl.com/ye6gdmd (the numbers are not the same though, in my tinyurl #3 is the Curia Pompey).

{On the Rome plaques}
#(1) reads in Italian and English;
"Remains of the central exedra of Pompey's portico. Used as the senate house, it was here that Julius Caesar was assassinated on March 15, 44BC."

#(1) is in the exact location of the 'Tree' I mention below but that is also the exact center of the Curia's rear section remains, so a logical place for them to put the #1.


The Hall's (Curia) prominent location in the exact center of the rear porticus would be visually attractive.
A beaufiful theater at one end, a large open area with trees, fountains, etc surrounded by a porticus and a temple-like Hall at the opposite end with a beautiful facade.
Also this had to be an important bldg in this complex because it was elevated on a high foundation requiring steps to enter and very likely had a porch with columns, architrave, pediment, etc.

If it was just a functional-type bldg (shop, storage, office, wc, etc) it would be at groundlevel like the shops on the southern-side of the porticus.


Now Suetonius, Plutarch and Appian claim Caesar was seated when attacked.
Which seems likely because;
The Statue of Pompey was probably on or besides the podium as a place of honor.

And Suetonius states that Caesar had a stylus in his hand with which he stabbed Casca in the arm after he struck the 1st blow.

This seems to rule out other locations like the Hall's front steps or porch because outside Marc Antony was being detained in a planned phony conversation with one of the conspirators.

Plus it would be in public view with the possibility of the Mob turning against them.

Or crossing the Hall to the podium; A moving target with the assassins also moving while trying to uncover their hidden daggers?

Plus Caesar would be on his feet with the possiblity of fleeing even wounded into the Senator's seats or to the front entrance.

But just wait a few seconds longer until Caesar is seated and all the assassins are in position with their hidden daggers at the ready and then just await the signal to attack.

Their victim now surrounded with his back figuratively against the wall.


[MODEL] www.vroma.org/images/raia_images/pompeyrecon.GIF That half-circle structure at the bottom of the model is the actual Theatre of Pompey.

The large rectangular Porticus of Pompey is behind the theatre.

And in the *exact center* of the rear section of the porticus is the Curia (Hall) of Pompey (small square bldg).

And behind the rear porticus are 4 Temples (A, B, C, D).

These temples predate Pompey's Theater & Porticus.

Directly behind the Curia is the circular Temple B and the rectangular Temple C (The Curia's rear corner actually butts up against the rear corner of Temple C).


This ACTUAL PHOTO puts you at the top of the MODEL above looking between Temples B & C at the back wall of the Curia of Pompey. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...uriaPompey.jpg OR
http://tinyurl.com/yezpyj7

Temple C on the left and to the right you can see a curved section of the circular Temple B.

See the tree roughly in the center; that tree is on groundlevel with the Temples and behind it in what looks like a low wall are the remaining finely-cut stone blocks that made-up the back wall of the Curia (the rest have been looted I assume).
And behind this low wall over to the modern wall arches and sidewalk are the remains of the brick/concrete-rubble foundation of the Curia.


To the right of this foundation see a small stone block pier, everything to the right of that and in front on the last wall arch on the right is missing (~30% of the total width), that was also part of the Curia.


You can see this in the EXCAVATION DIAGRAM, #3 is the Curia of Pompey http://tinyurl.com/ye6gdmd

Now go back to the ACTUAL PHOTO; Notice that right behind the tree I mentioned earlier there is another tree that is growing *in* the higher brick/concrete-rubble foundation.

The cool thing about that tree is it is *exactly* in the center of the Curia widthwise [.....T.....] and ~1m in from the outside backwall.


[SIDEVIEW; Tree is right-center
http://www.vroma.org/images/raia_ima...oargent11.jpg]

So if you had a time machine and went back to 44BC along with that tree, it would be growing inside the Curia alongside the backwall dead-center.


What I am getting at is; Julius Caesar or any VIP that was going to address a crowd in this Hall would enter thru the monumental front entrance, walk across the Hall and be seated along the backwall in the center on a low podium, probably similar to the Curia Julia in the Roman Forum www.vroma.org/images/raia_images/curia.jpg


Now go back to the ACTUAL PHOTO of back of the Curia and look at the center-tree I mention.

NOW IN YOUR MIND square-off the Curia's core foundation then put the floor over the foundation with the small podium on the floor.

So now you have a floor and podium hovering in the air between just above those modern wall arches and the modern sidewalk.

So it's very possible that 'Once Upon A Time' in that exact space on the morning of the Ides Of March 44BC, a seated Julius Caesar was struck by the 1st dagger and then raising to his feet he received an onslaught of stab wounds, finally falling to the floor and dying at the base of the Statue of Pompey?
Regards, Walter
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Old Mar 16th, 2012, 06:07 PM
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I think this artist's conception of the assassination follows pretty much as it was described (Tillius-front grabbing toga, Casca-behind about to strike the 1st blow, Caesar seated, backwall of the Curia and the base of the Pompey statue behind him).
http://tinyurl.com/7za3xcw

I just thought this would make a very good visual to remember when you are standing on the sidewalk because both are from the same point of view location. Regards, Walter
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Old Jul 17th, 2012, 01:20 PM
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This is an amazing source of information. Thank you!
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Old Jul 17th, 2012, 04:41 PM
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Let me re-do that Mar 1, 10:21 PM post as that photo link is now dead but this photo is still from Cicero's House.

http://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/p...m/17916679.jpg OR http://tinyurl.com/7yskm4f
Back-up photo; not as good but this link shouldn't go dead as it's been around for years.
www.vroma.org/~forum/images/forum.01.jpg

See the group of trees left of center, from there to the far right edge of the photo is the front of the Domus Publica which faces the Via Sacra which you can with people walking on and the intact 'Temple of Romulus' on the opposite side of the Via Sacra.

Now in your mind imagine the Domus Publica extends to the bottom of the photo. That was the section Emperor Augustus gave to the Vestal Virgins to extend their House which very likely wasn't actually built as we see today until after the 64AD Fire.
Although I won't be surprised if the Vestals didn't have a section in the the lower left corner or left side before Augustus.

And just right of dead-center of the photo you will see a small protective roofed structure [__]||[__], that excavation is of the Domus Publica's small Bath that dates to Julius Caesar's time. And in the 18yrs he resided there I'm sure he spent quite a bit of time relaxing in it except the years he was away at war and conquest.

My advice is too read thru my walk and when in Rome visit the 5 major sites of Julius Caesar's assassination.

It's easy as 4 of them are in the Roman Forum with the assassination site nearby the Pantheon and other sites that most tourists will likely visit so not really out of the way.

Back to the photo;

So 1st site is the Domus Publica although mostly buried just imagine the night before and the day of the assassination on the 'Ides of March'.

2nd site the Regia. In the photo the group of trees, on the left side of the trees is the Regia some of the branches in the photo cover part of this site.

So it's the night before the Ides and Julius Caesar is in the 'Shrine of Mars' within the Regia.
A thunderstorm rages as the Sacred Spears rattle in the Shrine foretelling a bad omen for Rome.

3rd site; In the photo just left of the Regia see a short up & down street with a couple of people on it. Just to the left of that at the photo's edge are some ugly brick structures.
That is the back/middle of the Temple of Julius Caesar where the Roman Mob cremated his body on the day of his funeral.

The actual site is in front under a protective roof in a semi-circular niche in front of the Temple. The concrete core of the altar survives within that niche and will very likely have flowers on top left by tourists.

4th site; Is the Rostra ~100m away from the front of the Temple of Julius Caesar, it's at the opposite end of the football field sized Roman Forum Square.

Just remember the Rostra you see from there is the partly reconstructed ugly tufa and brick Rostra built by Augustus (The remains are ugly the Rostra was originally quite beautiful).

The Rostra we want is the prettier stone curved Rostra behind it (best viewed from the side of the Arch of Septimus Severus) and the remaining marble curved steps best seen from behind this structure.
This is where Julius Caesar's body was laid when Marc Antony made his famous speech from *this* Rostra. Regards, Walter
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Old Oct 8th, 2012, 03:32 PM
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CORRECTION ON THE DOMUS PUBLICA'S ENTRANCE AND BATH.


My earlier guess sure looked like the right place.

What threw me off was many modern explanations of the ruins call the Atrium's Impluvium a 'Bath'.

And I couldn't fathom that the stylobate area could be a main entrance that opened into service-type rooms (bath) of the Domus.

Also it couldn't be at the western end which was the original House of the Vestal Virgins, in the back was the higher Via Nova (steps plus not a cool street like the Via Sacra), the eastern end was a short side street connecting the Via Sacra & Via Nova not a cool street either and if the so-called bath and service rooms fronted a large section facing the Via Sacra it had to be in the open section fronting the Via.

Plus 19C excavators placed 2 what I thought were statue bases* (1 on the left is actually a Lares altar) on each side of what looks exactly like the remains of a ramp *|'''* in that section.

The effect was (thinking tv and movies) an entrance flanked by 2 statues in what seemed like an ideal and practical location onto the Sacred Way (Via Sacra).

But I finally read the original 19C excavation reports which spells it out quite clearly...and that ain't the spot.


Which makes sense in hindsight; The entrance to the Temple and House of the Vestals face the Regia and the Domus Publica's entrance faces the open area between them. This was all the same religious complex and likely walled-in to some extent.

And here's the correct location. Regards, Walter

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX


http://tinyurl.com/vestalaerial1
http://tinyurl.com/vestalaerial2
http://tinyurl.com/7yskm4f
Use this photo as a guide if all the other links go dead, that is what you'll want in a aerial-view photo, then just 'google image' "house of the vestal virgins" for a better and more recent aerial photo. www.vroma.org/~forum/images/forum.01.jpg


Ok, looking at the photo (center-left) imagine yourself + standing in that group of trees ***
*`*`+`* looking to the right --`> to that roofed-over structure [`xx`] and then past it to where you see the ruins end at a vertical wall || in the extreme right of the photo.


Hopefully this won't create Fodors' icons and # will be ruins between the 3 points I want you to focus on (trees, structure, vertical wall section; **+*##[xx]##|����

Now imagine rooms above and below that long narrow section in the photo (actually walking thru it the rooms would be to the left and right).


That is the known section of the Domus Publica with very likely some basement rooms (just across the street there you can see basement slave cells from a private Domus/house of the same era).

Also no reason to doubt that there wasn't at least a 2nd floor over this.


Now when Augustus gave the Vestals the Domus Publica (12BC) they expanded their House all the way over to the right (the grassy area with the ponds in photo).

So it's possible the right-half of that section belonged to the Domus Publica or the Vestals perhaps just an open space like a garden?

Anyway something was there and after the 12BC fire the Vestals had that section along with the Domus Publica and expanded.


But let's stick with the known section of the Domus which is the coolest and goes back centuries to the very likely the time when Rome was ruled by Kings.

Although built over a few times it's still in the same location and we are only interested in Julius Caesar's last day there.


Ok, you can't enter that tree area but you can look into it.

The remains are all brick but 1 thing stands out which isn't brick and that is a whiteish/gray travertine stylobate.


A stylobate is usually a stepped platform that columns sit upon ==o==o== In this case the 1st step has a groove cut lengthwise in it, this is a rain channel/gutter allowing rain water to run-off. This means it was exposed to the outside elements.


The 2nd step is the actual stylobate and in this case it supported a vertical half-column as it has a base cut-out of it for a vertical half-column. Like a P vs an ---o---.

This tells us that an actual half-column once butted against a wall that we know was exposed to the outside. Why? As it was only decorative and not functional?

The most logical explanation for that plus based on the remains exact location that is in-line with the covered structure (which I'll mention next) tells us that it was once 1 of 2 half-columns with likely some type of pediment on top that framed an impressive doorway into the Domus Publica.

This stylobate dates to the dictator Sulla who lived in Julius Caesar's lifetime, Sulla almost had the teenage JC killed who skipped the country and Vestals intervened on his behalf.


Now that roofed structure in the photos; That's covers the Domus' Impluvium located in the Atrium, this was a grand entrance room of any Domus.

It was actually an open courtyard with rooms on the side like bedrooms and dining rooms but on the opposite end from the entrance was the Tablinum which was where the head of the house would conduct business or meet with guests.


Back to the Impluvium, there was a roof over this Atrium/courtyard that sloped downward with a rectangular opening in the center.

This allowed rainwater to fall into the impluvium, so in effect a small sunken pond in the atrium's center.

Below that was a cistern which stored this rain water but now with the aqueducts it was no longer needed and became more of a decorative feature in the atrium and could now even have a fountain filling it.


And to the right of this atrium was the Tablinum.


In the photo look for a partial section of a wall (vertical || in the photo) that marks the eastern limit of the Domus (in photo it's to the right and past the intact roundish Temple (of Romulus) on the opposite side of the Via Sacra (street).


Ok now now can picture the Domus Publica location in the photo.

But when you actually get your 'boots on the ground' follow these directions.

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Over 100yrs ago a book was published about the Roman Forum excavations in 1898-1905. http://tinyurl.com/8fdrahr
http://tinyurl.com/8aq6ee7


It tells of the traverine half-columns and the rain water channel of the Domus' facade.

And beyond that the atrium with a deep impluvium.

And beyond that the tablinum with a mosaic floor and an aspe in the back. And on the right a room with a delicate mosiac floor and a beautiful fresco wall.


So if you hop the fence you can walk to the left of the travertine half-column stylobate which was the main entrance used by Julius Caesar.


http://www.photoroma.com/foto.php?Ci...ID1=1127&ID2=0 OR http://tinyurl.com/9w6jdcq


It would look something like this
http://tinyurl.com/952xzjw the remaining section would be the lower rightside only but with a circular half-column base and larger wall blocks.

Note; that this half-column base is part of a wall block and there is also a wall block next to it.

So to the left of that half-column base would be the doorway into the Domus which is in-line with the atrium as it should be. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Then thru this entrance and into the Atrium where under the modern roof you can see the atrium's impluvium and then past that (bring a shovel) you can dig-up the Tablinum where Julius Caesar entertained guests and those on official business.
In a rich person's domus the father (head of the household) would store family records, have family statues/portraits or anything he wished to show-off to his guests.

The effect was if you were socially beneath this person or wanted something; You enter the door, short corridor into beautiful large Atrium and at the opposite end you see the Master of the house awaiting you in the Tablinum.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
http://tinyurl.com/dpatrium
An Atrium and Tablinum. In our case the tablinum's back wall would be a semicircular aspe. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

But perhaps it would be better to just visualize this behind the fence and avoid the legal bills and jail time.


So bottomline;

Just remember when there; Stand in front with your back to the Temple of Antoninus and Faustina.
Walk 45deg to the left to that group of trees.

Then find the travertine half-column stylobate beyond the fence and look east to the modern roof protecting the atrium's impluvium (the Via Sacra on the side of the Domus runs east uphill towards the Arch of Titus).


And then visualize; Late-morning March 15, 44BC as Julius Caesar walks out his door for the last time in his life.

A few hours later 3 slaves sent by his wife will return with his body on a litter and re-enter here.

His body was later waked in the Domus, possibly in the tablinum?

And then on March 18 his body is carried thru that door and over to the Rostra where Marc Antony has a few words to say.

Think of the others who walked thru that door to visit Julius Caesar...Marc Antony, Brutus and perhaps a young boy visiting his great-uncle who will one day inherit this Empire?

IMO the archaeological evidence is overwhelming and rock solid for this as the main entrance location into the Domus Publica.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Photos taken on the Via Sacra starting at the opposite end of the Domus.

Eastern Domus Limit (Tablinum) http://tinyurl.com/96dkg2j Excavated http://tinyurl.com/9kafhm8

Tablinum-> meets <-Atrium likely ~rightside of photo http://tinyurl.com/8bl8eof

Atrium's Impluvium (under roof) http://tinyurl.com/8hhzsef


Domus Publica's earliest foundations to its last (1stC-BC).

1st: Walls built of large blocks, 2 Roman feet thick of soft Tufa the earliest building material used in Rome this probably belongs to the Regal (Kings) Period. These were rapidly crumbling away during the 19C excavations.

2nd: Blocks of hard Tufa 18-22in thick and 3'6"-4ft long perhaps from
the rebuilding of 390BC or 210BC.

3rd: Concrete walls faced with bricks, columns of Travertine (loose or
in place) and fine mosic pavings, this is 1stC-BC.
Also now lost due to of exposure since the 1880's was the painted stucco inside and outside the house.

All the materials were once covered (tufa, travertine, brick facings), columns were crimson, rain-water channels were blue, inner walls with simple leaf ornaments, wreaths and flowers in panels with circles or garlands in the center.
And iron nails were also found in the brick facing to anchor the stucco.
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Old Oct 8th, 2012, 03:59 PM
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TTT
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Old Oct 19th, 2012, 10:10 AM
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On Oct 10, 2012 Spanish scientist/archaeologists who according to most press releases where mapping out the site of the excavations in the Largo d. Torre Argentina claimed to have found the exact location of Julius Caesar's assassination based on a previously unknown 'Augustus Memorial' possibly built on that spot.

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...tion-found.cfm OR
http://tinyurl.com/jcdeath

Is my take on their claim *IF* it is in fact the exposed ruins in that Largo of the rear section of the Curia Pompey that was discovered in the late-1920's and has been in plain view ever since.

Their vague description and their wide angle photo with that section centered in the background all point to this exposed section as the site in question.

Also other (different) photos in the World media show that same area with 2 sources actually narrowing it down to roughly a ~1sq/m location but it's unknown if either were given any exact location information by those involved in this project?
Perhaps not but if so, odd that they would do these *exact location photos* on their own without a source? Regards, Walter
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Old Feb 26th, 2014, 10:58 AM
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I topping this for the upcoming 'Ides of March' and also to post a new photo link to replace a dead link on the updated version of the assassination site (Curia Pompey) that is posted farther up THIS thread on Mar 1, 12 at 11:35pm.

"The Tree" mentioned in that post is the 4th tree from the left and next to the temple's column.
Also you can see the Curia's concrete core and stone block facing at the end of the drainage ditch.

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index....ar-was-stabbed
-(OR)-- http://tinyurl.com/9tgbo2q (photo can be enlarged)

Also it has been 1yr 4 months since those Spanish "scientist/archaeogists" made their so-called "Augustus Memorial claim" but they have never backed it up or have they mentioned it ever since!
And no other archaeologists in the World have ever supported their "claim" but they did get their 15 minutes of fame in the World media .
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Old Mar 5th, 2014, 09:01 AM
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This Julius Caesar assassination walk and the Roman Forum walk can get very longwinded so this is a condensed version of the sites connected to Julius Caesar and his assassination.
I have taken tours of the Roman Forum and overheard and watched countless group tours just walk by these sites except for the Temple of Julius Caesar which is a shame as I feel everyone knows the story of Julius Caesar's assassination and even though there is not very much to see esp at the Regia and Domus Publica the groundlevel ruins are there and a major part of the story.
Most people have bought Rome guidebooks before their trip and it would be very easy just to pencil-in these locations so they would not miss them.
If any of the links go dead over time just 'google image' them.
================================================== =========

These are the Roman Forum sites.

Go to:

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...lking-tour.cfm

---(OR)---

http://tinyurl.com/romanmuzzy


And scroll-down to these 2 sections;

#9. PART 2 [ROSTRA]

#11. PART 2 UMBILICUS URBIS ROMAE AND MUNDUS

This site is the Julius Caesar Rostra where his body was laid-out and Marc Antony made his famous speech.
This is a photo of Julius Caesar's Rostra. It is the slightly curved ruin on the left, what you see is the concrete core which would have been marble-faced. You can see a small section of this marble facing at the far end along with some of the decorative marble remains placed on top. Note: the width of this rostra where the speaker(s) would stand it's only ~1m wide for the entire length.
Later Augustus built-over this rostra and extended it 10m (the ruins on the right) so it was now more like a stage.
This is best viewed from the otherside next to the Arch of Septimius Severus.

http://tinyurl.com/nlfhsb9 --(IS THIS)-- http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_CVC1vurT3x...0/IMG_3032.JPG


[PART 2]

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...our-part-2.cfm

---(OR)---

http://tinyurl.com/romanmuzzy2

#19. TEMPLE OF JULIUS CAESAR

The spot where Julius Caesar's body was cremated and later this temple was built there.

#22. REGIA
The official office of the Pontifex Maximus which Caesar was since 62BC right up until his death.

#26. DOMUS PUBLICA

This was the home of the Pontifex Maximus where Julius Caesar lived, he walked out his doorway on the Ides of March and his body was carried back to his house a few hours later by his 3 slaves.

================================================== =========

More info on the lay-out of the Domus Publica are in these sections.

#25. HOUSE OF THE VESTAL VIRGINS

#28. VIA SACRA & SITES

================================================== ========
JULIUS CAESAR ASSASSINATION SITE

This is the Curia Pompey site which was were Julius Caesar was assassinated, it is ~800m northwest of the Roman Forum so a 15min walk at most.
On a map this location is called the 'Largo di Torre Argentina' and it is a city block of excavated ruins with the famous cat sanctuary within.

I condensed the assassination site for a post on a history/archaeology messageboard a while back which makes it alot easier to follow.
Most archaeologists and historians including Rome's Archaeology Department believe that this is the Curia (Hall) of Pompey.

I've been posting about the Curia's location on European travel messageboards since ~'98 and in ~2004/5 the City of Rome finally put up plaques all around this 1 block site which makes it alot easier to find.

These plaques have this EXCAVATION DIAGRAM http://tinyurl.com/ye6gdmd (the numbers are not the same though, in my tinyurl #3 is the Curia Pompey).

{On the Rome plaques at the site}

#(1) reads in Italian and English;
"Remains of the central exedra of Pompey's portico. Used as the senate house, it was here that Julius Caesar was assassinated on March 15, 44BC."
#(1) is in the exact location of the 'Tree' I mention below but that is also the exact center of the Curia's rear section remains, so a logical place for them to put the #1.

Also note on the 'Excavation Diagram' that the right (north) rear section of the Curia is missing which is ~25-30% but if you look over the sidewalk railing straight-down you can see a couple of those finely cut stone blocks (these type blocks are seen in the photo below) protruding from the area beneath the sidewalk at groundlevel, those are from the right (north) long side of the Curia |___..."<--- So even though the 25-30% is missing we can still see how wide this was.

The Hall's (Curia) prominent location in the exact center of the rear porticus would be visually attractive.
A beautiful theater at one end, a large open area with trees, fountains, etc surrounded by a porticus and a temple-like Hall at the opposite end with a beautiful facade.
Also this had to be an important bldg in this complex because it was elevated on a high foundation requiring steps to enter and very likely had a porch with columns, architrave, pediment, etc.
If it was just a functional-type bldg (shop, storage, office, wc, etc) it would be at groundlevel like the shops on the southern-side of the porticus.

Now Suetonius, Plutarch and Appian claim Caesar was seated when attacked.
Which seems likely because;

The Statue of Pompey was probably on or besides the podium as a place of honor.
And Suetonius states that Caesar had a stylus in his hand with which he stabbed Casca in the arm after he struck the 1st blow.
This seems to rule out other locations like the Hall's front steps or porch because outside Marc Antony was being detained in a planned phony conversation with one of the conspirators.
Plus it would be in public view with the possibility of the Mob turning against them.
Or crossing the Hall to the podium; A moving target with the assassins also moving while trying to uncover their hidden daggers?
Plus Caesar would be on his feet with the possiblity of fleeing even wounded into the Senator's seats or to the front entrance.
But just wait a few seconds longer until Caesar is seated and all the assassins are in position with their hidden daggers at the ready and then just await the signal to attack.
Their victim now surrounded with his back figuratively against the wall.

[MODEL] www.vroma.org/images/raia_images/pompeyrecon.GIF That half-circle structure at the bottom of the model is the actual Theatre of Pompey.
The large rectangular Porticus of Pompey is behind the theatre.
And in the *exact center* of the rear section of the porticus is the Curia (Hall) of Pompey (small square bldg).
And behind the rear porticus are 4 Temples (A, B, C, D).
These temples predate Pompey's Theater & Porticus.
Directly behind the Curia is the circular Temple B and the rectangular Temple C (The Curia's rear corner actually butts up against the rear corner of Temple C).

This PHOTO puts you at the top of the MODEL above looking between Temples B & C at the back wall of the Curia of Pompey.
http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index....ar-was-stabbed
-(OR)-- http://tinyurl.com/9tgbo2q (photo can be enlarged)
Temple C is on the left and on the right the circular Temple B.

The Tree" I keep mentioning is the 4th tree from the left and next to the temple's column.

Also you can see the Curia's concrete core and stone block facing at the end of the drainage ditch, those finely-cut stone blocks were likely looted as was the entire upper building except for the concrete foundation.

The cool thing about that "Tree is it is *exactly* in the center of the Curia hall widthwise [.....T.....] and ~1m in from the outside backwall, so picture a rectangular audience hall that tree would be growing inside, dead-center along the rear wall. The exact place where someone presiding over an assembly would be seated and exactly where a statue would be placed of the VIP (Pompey) who build this structure.

[SIDEVIEW; Tree is right-center
http://www.vroma.org/images/raia_ima...oargent11.jpg]

So if you had a time machine and went back to 44BC along with that tree, it would be growing inside the Curia alongside the backwall dead-center. [-____|||| <-front stepped entrance

What I am getting at is; Any VIP that was going to address a crowd in this Hall would enter thru the monumental front entrance, walk across the Hall and be seated along the backwall in the center on possibly a low podium perhaps similar to the Curia Julia in the Roman Forum www.vroma.org/images/raia_images/curia.jpg or just a chair placed there on the floor.

So now imagine the missing floor of the Curia hovering in the air just above the Tree's ruins in that photo and you are looking at the rear section of this building [- the rest of the Curia is beneath the sidewalk and street with the stepped monumental entrance across the street beneath the sidewalk and modern buildings.

So it's very possible that 'Once Upon A Time' in that exact "Tree" space on the morning of the Ides Of March 44BC, a seated Julius Caesar was struck by the 1st dagger and then raising to his feet he received an onslaught of stab wounds, finally falling to the floor and dying at the base of the Statue of Pompey?

This is how Suetonius described it.

"As he took his seat, the conspirators gathered about him as if to pay their respects, and straightway Tillius Cimber, who had assumed the lead, came nearer as though to ask something; and when Caesar with a gesture put him off to another time, Cimber caught his toga by both shoulders; then as Caesar cried, "Why, this is violence!" one of the Cascas stabbed him from one side just below the throat.
Caesar caught Casca's arm and ran it through with his stylus, but as he tried to leap to his feet, he was stopped by another wound.

When he saw that he was beset on every side by drawn daggers, he muffled his head in his robe, and at the same time drew down its lap to his feet with his left hand, in order to fall more decently, with the lower part of his body also covered.

And in this wise he was stabbed with three and twenty wounds, uttering not a word, but merely a groan at the first stroke, though some have written that when Marcus Brutus rushed at him, he said in Greek, "You too, my child?" All the conspirators made off, and he lay there lifeless for some time, and finally three common slaves put him on a litter and carried him home, with one arm hanging down.

And of so many wounds none turned out to be mortal, in the opinion of the physician Antistius, except the second one in the breast." (This was the World's first recorded autopsy which took place in the Domus Publica)
================================================== ======

p.s. In the original walk at the assassination I wrongly credit Julius Caesar with saying this as he was being stabbed
"JC rises still stuggling with Casca and yells in Greek "Brother Help!" (to Antony I assume?)"

It was actually Casca who called to his real brother for Help.
Rostra is offline  
Old Mar 5th, 2014, 09:07 AM
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Walter, is Rostra your new handle?

Thank you for the information...
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