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Roma Pass or Bus 110

Old Apr 20th, 2012, 08:53 AM
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Roma Pass or Bus 110

I am thinking of buying Roma Pass for our Rome trip during the first week of May. We will be there for 3 days. Which is the best way to go around visiting all the important sites? Does Roma Pass provide transportation on Bus 110? I am assuming I have to buy it separately. Does Bus 110 more flexibility/easy access to these sites than other public transportation?

John
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Old Apr 20th, 2012, 09:47 AM
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The 110 and the Archeobus are not part of the public transit system. You can actually do the same type of trips using public buses for a lot less money, but it will take a combination of routes.

With the 110 you buy your ticket, but that does not guarantee a seat. In other words, you may find yourself standing on the street, rain is falling, 110 pulls up but it is full and you have to wait another 20 minutes. The little guide radios only work about 1/2 the time.

With most public lines, if you don't like the first bus, take another. My favorite lines are the 81,87,492,70,116,119. For Appian Way do the 118.

If you want, here is the link on my website for my favorite bus routes in Rome...

http://www.passagetoroma.com/index.php/bus-routes

dave
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Old Apr 20th, 2012, 03:43 PM
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I'd go with Dave's advise. Plus you could pick-up a Roma Metro-Bus map which has a laminated cover map that shows the bus numbers and the main streets, *very* easy to follow.

Looking at a map and seeing the sites you want to visit you think about how to get from A to B but not the map's scale that shows distances, which often isn't as far away as it looks on the map.
Plus more than likely there are a few cool sites on the way that you would miss on a bus.

There are fancy websites that show distances and walking times but "we don't need no stinkin' fancy websites ". (Misquote from ""The Treasure of Sierra Madre").

Try this with a map and the cut length of paper, fold it in half and then in half again. Now each fold is 5mins slow walking time totaling 20min

This is from a past post of mine '07;

I'm 6'2", ~250lbs and a slow walker to begin with.

The 'Time' part also includes waiting for green crossing lights, stopping or slowing down to cross at the cross-streets (cars/motorcycles), pedestian slowdowns (cafe tables on sidewalks, map or picture taking tourists, etc).

Also it was my intent to time this distance for future postings so it is accurate for slow walkers like myself.

Look at your map;

Using a piece of paper mark the distance from the *Front Door* of Termini Train station, down Via Cavour right to the entrance to the Roman Forum on Via d. Fori Imperiali (across the Via and entrance is ~40m past the sidewalk).

Now picture a nameless 52yr old man, overweight, with a drugstore Over-The-Counter kneebrace on and puffing on a Marlboro, it took him exactly 20mins to cover that distance.

So you can use that strip of paper as 'time & distance gauge' fairly accurately if you're a slow walker or just strolling along taking time to smell the roses.

If you walk at a quick pace just increase the distance ~20% and you'll be in the ballpark.
Regards, Walter
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Old Apr 20th, 2012, 05:40 PM
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The Roma Pass gives a discount for the 110.

I'm going to disagree with Walter about walking from Termini to the Forum. The walk is not attractive and I think you should save your feet and hop the subway or a bus. You certainly don't want to walk the opposite direction as it's all uphill.

ATAC is the city transport website and has all kinds of route maps. Here's the map of the little electric buses that run through the historic center. They will get you to most tourist places.
http://www.atac.roma.it/files/doc.asp?r=9

Tram line map:
http://www.atac.roma.it/files/doc.asp?r=5

City center buses (you will have to zoom in to see stops):
http://www.atac.roma.it/files/doc.asp?r=3

It's hard to get the value of a Roma Pass since the last price increase. You can always buy a transport only pass, if you don't want the Roma Pass. A one day pass is 4€ while a 3 day is 11€. This may increase this summer as there has been a request for rate increase.
http://www.atac.roma.it/index.asp?p=14

On ATAC, you can enter your route and it will tell you the transport to take.
http://www.atac.roma.it/index.asp?lingua=ENG

Since you seem interested in the 110, you might also look at the Christiana open bus. There is a 3 day pass that includes this bus, the Vatican museums plus a tour of the gardens and everything the Roma Pass includes, but the cost is 85€. I'm not sure you would get your money's worth, but depends on what you plan to see.
http://www.omniavaticanrome.org/en/the-card/index.html

http://www.omniavaticanrome.org/en/t.../open-bus.html
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Old Apr 20th, 2012, 07:07 PM
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kybourbon; No you misunderstood me. It's just a gauge on how much distance a slow walker can cover in 20min.

I only used that example because it's a straight shot and a bit congested.
Basically it's a worst case senario and most people will cover more distance in that timeframe.
And I would never recommend Via Cavour as a scenic walk.

You cut or mark a paper for that distance and can use it anywhere (Piazza Venezia to Piazza Navona, hotel to xyz, etc.) just to give someone an idea of distance vs maximum time.
Regards, Walter
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Old Apr 21st, 2012, 03:19 AM
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Oh my!

Was there ever a better definition of "masochistic" than standing waiting in the rain for an opentop bus?

We've enjoyed using the 110 and, if not suffering from vertigo or challenged by the stairs, the views from their upper decks are way better than any of the ordinary ones will provide!

If it's still available next month, take advantage of the €18 price for a 48 hour ticket (possibly 2 days, not than 10:00 to 09:59 etc?)...

http://www.trambusopen.com/en/home.cfm

... and then also use it to get reductions at the various museums etc (*) listed on...

http://www.trambusopen.com/en/110-open/rates.cfm

... although, for a first visit, there are some there I'd not bother with!

And what I'd suggest doing is to start your visit to the city by going to Termini, to catch it where the route begins - actually on Viale Einaudi, by the fence that surrounds the branch of the 'National Roman Museum' housed in the Baths of Diocletian....

http://www.pbase.com/isolaverde/nrm_dioclet

... to have your choice of seat, and find one where a previous passengers hasn't b'd up the earphone socket!

(Plus also, if beginning elsewhere, the drivers usually have to take a 15 minute break at Termini, which can involve a mid-route swap onto another bus, or a wait!)

Then do the entire 100 minute circuit - to get an initial feel for, and look at, the city... and to have at least a sight of places you won't have time to get to individually?

Afterwards, perhaps pop into one of the NMR branches there - either the one mentioned above or Palazzo Massimo opposite, where they've a great collection of frescoes and mosaics....

http://www.pbase.com/isolaverde/massimo

The ticket you'd get at either actually allows entrance to 4 museums, all of which are interesting: in Italian, that Terme di Diocleziano and Palazzo Massimo.. and also the Crypta Balbi and Palazzo Altemps.

Something similar happens in several case - you'll spot others, such as the Colosseum, Forum, Palatine 'circuit', on this list from the RomaPass website:

http://romapass.it/doc/sitiAderentiC...lietti_eng.pdf

....................................

Fine thing and very convenient although it can be, at the new price of €30 the RomaPass isn't great value at present - especially if you've already got the benefits of the 110's reductions...

Instead, for getting around, I'd buy a few of the €1 ATAC single-journey tickets - and use those for riding the ordinary buses, trams etc whenever there isn't a 110 handy!

When not walking, we stick to the little electric buses as much as we can - between them, with the introduction of the 125 for Trastevere, they cover most of the areas of interest....

http://www.pbase.com/isolaverde/electric_buses

Peter

(*) Have been to most on that list - pictures from some that allow such things here:

http://www.pbase.com/isolaverde/places_rome
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