Question on German Train Tickets

Old May 11th, 2014, 02:00 PM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,318
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Question on German Train Tickets

Looking at going to Salzburg from Munich on a day trip on 8 Jun 2014. I'm looking in the DB Bahn website and I see the type of service is either: RJ, M, or EC. I can find in general searching what the RJ (Railjet) and EC (EuroCity) mean, but I can't seem to find what type of train service "M" denotes. Can someone tell me what this means?

Right now there are some saver fares on the site available.

Thanks
patandhank is offline  
Old May 11th, 2014, 02:14 PM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
And you can use the Bavarian Lander Ticket which for 39 euros gives two people (or more) unlimited use of regional trains, including to Salzburg Hbf and back even though that station is just a tad inside Austria - considered to be a German station for tarifcation purposes.

but you must use regional trains - not any of the ones you list above I believe - to see regional trains on bahn.de/en you have to not say just fastest connections but show all connections.

Regional trains may take about an hour or more each way compared to ICE/RailJet - the fastest crack trains of the German Railways and Austrian Railways respectively in this case. Not sure what "M" means - may be an Austrian train as I have not seen this on German trains though it could be.

For lots of great info on German and Austrian and European trains I always spotlight these superb IMO sites: www.seat61.com; www.budgeteuropetravel.com and www.ricksteves.com.

Is this your only rail trip in Germany - if doing a handful then the German Railpass can be as cheap as a string of discounted tickets and let you just hop on practically any ole train any ole time!

Bavarian Lander Tickets are sold at stations in Germany, at ticket windows or from machines.
PalenQ is offline  
Old May 11th, 2014, 02:17 PM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,963
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hmmm. When you click on a specific train trip (red tab on left of course), it reads "M" for Meridian...but what's that? Maybe just a technical name for type of train?
mokka4 is offline  
Old May 11th, 2014, 02:18 PM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Yes never heard of it before but those trains take 30-45 minutes longer than the EC (EuroCity) or RailJet trains so they could possibly be regional trains that qualify for the Lander Ticket?
PalenQ is offline  
Old May 11th, 2014, 03:00 PM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,207
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Meridian is a private railway company that, since recently, covers this route instead of DB. Their trains qualify as regional trains and the Bayern-Ticket is valid for them.
quokka is offline  
Old May 11th, 2014, 05:15 PM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 38,066
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Be aware of the timeframe restrictions on the Lander tickets; they cannot be used at "any ole time."
Dukey1 is offline  
Old May 11th, 2014, 09:32 PM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,228
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
patandhank: Frankly, you've gotten some pretty weak information on this thread so far. Here are some facts about the Bayern Ticket.

Using the Bayern ticket is a relatively flexible and inexpensive way to get from Munich to Salzburg cheaply. The actual price for two is €27 - not €39. The M trains, as quokka says, are Meridian-owned and are eligible for use with the Bayern ticket. These M trains typically take about 2 hours to Salzburg (15-20 minutes longer - not 30-45 minutes - than the faster and more expensive RJ and EC trains.) The standard walk-up fare for two on the faster trains would be €64 - €72 one way; you can be the judge whether the extra time on the train is worth the savings of roughly €40.

Some people use the Bayern ticket to day-trip to Salzburg from Munich - the round trip is only €27 since it's a day pass - so for some the Bayern ticket represents even greater savings.

The only time restriction on the Bayern ticket is that it is valid weekdays starting at 9 am; on Saturday and Sunday it is valid at any hour, so in your case, you can indeed go "any ole time" you like - you are traveling on a Sunday.

You do not need to buy the Bayern ticket online or in advance, even though this is possible. It will be available on your day of travel at ticket machines in Munich or anywhere else in Germany. There is no real advantage to purchasing in advance - only the disadvantage that once you've bought it, it is bought. So I wouldn't buy it until I were 100% sure of my travel plans.

The following page provides detailed info on the Bayern ticket (note that the old base price of €22 for one is now €23.)

http://www.munich-touristinfo.de/Bavaria-Ticket.htm

At the DB itinerary page, if you want to pull up ONLY Bayern ticket eligible trains, be sure to specify "only local transport" under "means of transport". If you leave it on "all", you'll get high speed trains too. DB itinerary page:

http://reiseauskunft.bahn.de/bin/query.exe/en
Russ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 05:09 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Could I assume that railpasses, like Bavarian Tickets, are valid on Meridian trains though with a pass who would take a slower train over a faster train?
PalenQ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 05:54 AM
  #9  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,228
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
"Could I assume that railpasses, like Bavarian Tickets, are valid on Meridian trains though with a pass who would take a slower train over a faster train?"

A German railpass is valid on virtually all types of train. I don't know why a railpass holder would opt for the slower train.

But I don't understand why you are asking about railpasses here, palenque. "patandhank" did not indicate that they have plans for a railpass; in fact, the original post says they're looking at SAVER FARES, which are point-to-point tickets.
Russ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 06:59 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Well Russ I was asking for my own information and knowledge -

<A German railpass is valid on virtually all types of train. I don't know why a railpass holder would opt for the slower train>

I may want to take a M train to say go to Prien for the Mad Ludwig's Chiemsee Bavarian Versailles, etc - where the faster trains may not stop there or some other minor stop not served by the faster trains.

I only brought up the railpass for the OP IF they were taking several other longish train rides - in which case a pass can be as cheap as a series of discounted tickets sans any restrictions - having to take regional trains like on Lander Cards are fine but they are IME not nearly as comfy (have not ridden the newish M trains) and can take much longer - 1.5 hours all told longer to Salzburg means 1.5 hours less in that city with so many amazing sights.
PalenQ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 07:53 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,228
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
"1.5 hours all told longer to Salzburg means 1.5 hours less in that city with so many amazing sights."

1.5 hours extra? Even if you are talking round trip, palenque, that is a false figure.

The very fastest high-speed RJ train takes about 90 minutes. The slowest M train takes about 120 minutes. That's 30 minutes difference, times two trips = 60 minutes = ONE hour. Not 1.5 hours. You are very familiar with the DB site, but why do you say it's 90 minutes, when it's 60??

Restrictions: The M trains are hourly. The Railjet runs every other hour. If you rise with the chickens and have breakfast super early (if your hotel even offers it that early) you can maybe catch the 7:31 Railjet. But what if you don't want to do that? The next RJ is at 9:34. Because of their frequency the M trains offer more flexibility; if you take the 7:55 or the 8:54 M train, you get to Salzburg sooner than you could with the 9:34 RJ. (There's an EC train at 8:18 but the cost is about the same as the RJ - see below - and the time saved is less than 20 minutes one way.)

Cost: The best round-trip advance-purchase railjet fare locks you into a specific departure time and costs €58 for two. The M train round trip is €27 for two with the Bayern ticket.

The OP can decide for himself which trains/tickets he wants. But if we're going to advise him, let's agree to give him some real facts to work with.
Russ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 08:40 AM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Oops - I was reverting sans thinking to the former Regional train times - yes I see it is about an hour all told total more travel time - I have no seen Meridian trains but if like the old regional trains much less comfy and tending to be at times very crowded - especially when they act as school buses when kids swarm aboard - has happened more than a few times IME.

Hopefully Meridian trains are a step up from the old hard-class regional trains - yeh those with metal seats!
PalenQ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 10:22 AM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,228
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
"Hopefully Meridian trains are a step up from the old hard-class regional trains - yeh those with metal seats!"

I've been traveling to Germany for decades. I have never sat in a metal seat.

Here's a photo of the Meridian train interior between Salzburg and Munich:

http://www.railblog.info/wp-content/...7-image234.jpg

Here's a photo of the milk-run regional train used along the Rhine:

http://www.martinspies.de/album/mitt...n08/foto05.JPG

Were your train trips pre-WW II?

PalenQ - If I'm being kind, I have to say that your comments demonstrate the most inventive imagination ever - but isn't this thread riddled with enough misinformation already? Metal seats, my tush!
Russ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 10:31 AM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,228
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
PalenQ warns that the M trains (regional trains between Munich and Salzburg) may tend "to be at times very crowded - especially when they act as school buses when kids swarm aboard..."

Are you saying that noisy school kids are going to board a Regional Express train from Munich? Where do they go to school? 35 minutes outside Munich in Rosenheim? An hour outside Munich in Prien? or in Salzburg? The M trains are not the S-Bahn.

I'd be more concerned about a volcanic eruption.
Russ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 10:47 AM
  #15  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,955
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
PalQ, you cannot tell the difference in the rolling stock between the Meridian and the DB. In fact, the trains still look exactly the same, same paint job, same big red "DB," etc. The inside is exactly the same, as well. The conductors still wear the blue uniforms with the DB logo on them.

s
swandav2000 is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 12:45 PM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Russ - I was thinking the Meridian trains replaced the regional trains that IME do have those temporary crowding of kids problem - when I looked up the M train stops it seemed to stop at lots of places - they stop sometimes every 8-10 minutes - and if they have replaced largely the old regional trains then I may assume they could serve as school buses - do you have info they do not?
PalenQ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 01:19 PM
  #17  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,228
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
PalenQ: All you need to do is look at the train schedules.

The M trains in question between Munich and Salzburg are NOT the milk run trains that drop off school kids. These M trains replaced the old RE (Regional Express trains) that offer faster regional service with fewer stops to more distant points and are not able to drop of kids near their homes!

And even if there WERE some school kids on one of these Salzburg-bound trains... they would not be on the train for more than a few minutes. They are not going to Salzburg, Prien, or even Rosenheim. They're going home to Mutti and Vati. They'd be jumping off before the OP had time to appreciate the cultural experience.

The milk run M trains between Munich and Kufstein do stop at every little stop on the way and may indeed contain the evil groups children; these RB-like trains use the same tracks as the trains to Salzburg as far as Rosenheim. Maybe you got one one of these trains to Kufstein at one point in time, but the OP is not going to Kufstein. Any daytrip to Salzburg will be done on the direct express trains, the only ones that go there.

Anyway, it goes without saying that a full day in Salzburg will mean a late afternoon or evening departure at an hour well after kids have already arrived home.

Metal seats, school kids... what else is on your plate of fears? Komodo dragons?
Russ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 02:53 PM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
No - thanks for clearing that up - I tried to see if Regional trains were still running on bahn.de and it seemed that relatively few were on this line - maybe they are timed for schools.
PalenQ is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 03:21 PM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,207
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Pat and Hank are travelling on 8 June, which is Whitsunday. There is no need to fear schoolkids that day. I think the Komodo dragons will also be on holiday then;-)
quokka is offline  
Old May 12th, 2014, 04:04 PM
  #20  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
church goers IME can clog these type trains for a few stops Would even be exacerbated on holy days, especially in a conservative Catholic Bavaria.
PalenQ is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:32 PM.