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Pronunciation Q. - How embarassed should I be?

Pronunciation Q. - How embarassed should I be?

Old Jun 24th, 2005, 01:12 PM
  #21  
 
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Patrick, anise, licorice, ouzo, and all related flavors taste like soap to me. Cilantro, otoh, I love. I find it fascinating that things can taste so different to different people, while at the same time we usually agree on what tastes "good."
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 01:16 PM
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It is strange how we all have different likes and dislikes. Personally I cannot stand cilantro either! It makes me shudder to even think about it. But most people love it. But I love raw oysters, mussels, liver etc. and that makes a lot people almost gag. Viva la difference!
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 03:48 PM
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Patrick and I agree on this one--as this is a family website, I won't mention how I pronounce cilantro.

When words are adopted by another language, the pronunciation is often (probably usually) changed.
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 04:02 PM
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If your waiter insists on pronouncing it "brushetta" ask them if they will serve it with a glass of "shianti" wine.
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 04:04 PM
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Ooh, nonnafelice, that's EXACTLY what I was looking for! Thanks.
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 04:22 PM
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cilantro was one that threw me off in Latin America- my family said "cul an tro". It's possible that they miss pronounced as well,though...

I have an (American) aunt who still says "kay-sa-dill-as" instead of "quesa-dee-as".

Okay- now my question is about the proper pronunciation of the word "biscotti". I always said "beh-SCOTT-ee". Then, I was corrected by my bakery manager (used to work there) and told in a condescending way that I was a silly American, and the word is "bish-kot".

I know for a fact that she is a FLAMING MORON, and I would LOVE confirmation that I was right... was I???
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 04:23 PM
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Elaine, I have never heard of cilantrillo but why not? I have heard culantro and cilantro in Spanish. Interesting!
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 04:29 PM
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Patrick, I am surprised that a man with such sophisticated tastes would dislike cilantro. Give it another try, dear.
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 04:49 PM
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The word is bee-SCOTE-ee if there are more than one bee-SCOTE-o.

Don't let her tell you it's dialect. It's more like ebonics she's using.
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 04:51 PM
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My understanding is that cilantro and culantro are two different (though similar) plants, both of which are used in Latin American cooking.

As for "bish-kot," it sounds like the pronunciation of an Italian-American of Southern Italian ancestry: cf. "manigot," "rigot," and "pro-zhoot" for manicotti, ricotta, and prosciutto. Standard Italian pronunciation is "bee-SKOT-tee."

I don't think trying cilantro again is likely to change Patrick's opinion. Some people apparently have a gene that causes them to find the taste of cilantro extremely unpleasant.

Finally, I was reading an old cookbook this evening and was reminded that a generation ago, the standard English pronunication of cilantro was "Chinese parsley."
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 04:56 PM
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Thanks for telling me that a person with "sophisticated tastes" should not be allowed to dislike a particular seasoning. I thought that's what makes a person have sophisticated taste -- the ability to like or dislike varying things -- and to be able to distinquish between them. I don't need another try, when it is thrown on dish after dish these days as if it were something "special" and often destroys the subtle flavors of an otherwise very good dish. There's nothing wrong with you if you happen to like that flavor. I happen to not!
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 05:19 PM
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This is one of those recurring discussions...

http://fodors.com/forums/threadselec...p;tid=34557110
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 05:29 PM
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I don't like most of the species..it seems I'm not sophisticated
Maybe I won't have a good time in London surrounded by spicy meals...
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 05:43 PM
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Italian/Americans do pronounce things differently than the Italia residents so let's not be so judegemental and smug. This happens in Montreal/France residents who have migrated there.
Cilantro tastes like soap to those who are allergic to this herb.
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 05:54 PM
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By the way, in Spain "cilantro" is pronounced more like in English "z" at the beginning of a word, e.g "zip".
Finally I've discovered that my time studying is useful !!
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 06:18 PM
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"Cilantro tastes like soap to those who are allergic to this herb."

Is that true, tondalaya? Tell me more.
This is interesting because I have no allergies that I know of except an odd one to the oyster plant and also wandering jew (two very closely related plants -- herbs?-- which are abundant here in South Florida). Direct exposure to either causes me to break out and itch -- but it does go away with no major effects. It suddenly occurs to me that over the past year or so from time to time I have horrible itching spells on my forearms in the evening, sometimes with a slight rash and then they go away by morning. I've never been able to pinpoint why these occur. I must now keep a record and see if possibly those are happening after eating cilantro? My reference to tasting like soap wasn't meant to be a casual insult -- it really does taste like it to me. I love salsa, but when it is loaded with cilantro, I nearly gag. So is that an allergy?

Gee, mcburja, aren't you glad you asked how to pronounce a couple words? Look what you've started.
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 06:20 PM
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I agree Americans of Italian background do tend to sometimes pronounce words a but differently then the residents of Italy. Not my comment but comments from my friends in Italy that visit here in the US. But also, different areas/regions of Italy have different pronounciations and sometimes different words for the same thing, especially amoung older people and people in less populated areas. Again, not my opinion but opinions of Italians in Italy.

But I love your comment Nonafelice! Too perfect IMO! That one I will remember.

I don't know (or remember) if cilantro taste like soap to me as it has been so long since I have eaten it, but again I do not like it. And although there are foods I cannot eat due to food allergies there are very few food items I do not like.

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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 06:38 PM
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http://splendidtable.forum.publicrad.../01/18/1356228
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 07:41 PM
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May I please ask how one pronounces the "Buttes" as in Buttes-Chaumont..?
Is it "beauts" (as in beauty)?
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 08:58 PM
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It's pronounced like "boot."
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