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Pronunciation of An Daingean

Old May 11th, 2012, 03:05 PM
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Pronunciation of An Daingean

My basic research suggests to me that the correct pronunciation of An Daingean (the Irish name for Dingle) would appear, without overcomplicating it, to be "On Die-in." Is this close enough to avoid offending anyone? If not, can someone please improve on it?
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Old May 11th, 2012, 03:21 PM
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Or rather, On Dang-en, with a soft, almost nasal g.
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Old May 11th, 2012, 03:34 PM
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It's quite okay to call it Dingle. In general, the locals call it Dingle when they are speaking English - which they usually are, as the Gaelic speaking community is generally to be found further west in places like Fionn Trá, Dún Chaoin, and Baile an Feirtéirigh (which you may refer to as Ventry, Dunquin, and Ballyferriter).
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Old May 11th, 2012, 10:09 PM
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This was posted several years ago on the Irish Board, separate from Fodor.

"An Daingean, nice as it sounds, is not proper Irish. The Irish for Dingle is Daingean Uí Cúise. It was always known as this up until relatively recently and never as the main name until that dipsh*t Éamonn Ó Cuiv (which isn`t proper Irish either) started messing around with it. As a resident of Daingean Uí Cúise and an Irish speaker it p*sses me right off!"
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Old May 11th, 2012, 10:42 PM
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How do Americans react when Irish folk visit and do that stupid imitation accent? If you have to learn something in Irish then stick to Hello and Thank you, leave the place names to the locals.
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Old May 12th, 2012, 12:38 AM
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Two minor corrections, one in my own post, and one in the post quoted by Rastaguytoday:
- Baile an Fheirtéirigh (the "h" is significant in pronunciation);
- Daingean Uí Chúis.

Tony seems a bit irked by the idea of visitors trying to use Gaelic versions of placenames. What about the great Fodor's tradition of blending in with the locals? There are 4,752 Americans on the Dingle Peninsula right now, but 7 of them are getting through unnoticed because of their ability to pass themselves off as Kerrymen.
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Old May 12th, 2012, 01:42 AM
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So it's true Dingle is the 51st State!

I don't get urked and rarely "give out". Even as the only Irishman in Dingle for the night with a Yorkshire accent I blended in. That was 30 years ago. Now its a little different.

Blending in with the locals has nothing to do with saying the place names in the local tongue, because every Irishman knows that what a place is really called depends on where you come from not how the place is spelt. Blending is is about blending in, having the craic (talking about the news of the day (not getting blind drunk and having a prance)) and behaving normally. Hello and thank you in Irish with a smile will go a lot further than "how do I get to Daingean Uí Chúis"
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Old May 12th, 2012, 05:20 PM
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It would be my pleasure to learn some basic Irish phrases but, alas, my three guidebooks have chosen not to provide any. I have Fodor's Ireland 2012, Steves Ireland 2012, and the current Michelin Green Guide to Ireland.

Can anyone please point me to a website with downloadable (to my iPad and our Kindles) basic phrases (with pronunciation)?
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Old May 13th, 2012, 02:21 AM
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You can dump the second of those.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/engli...329506703?mt=8
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Old May 13th, 2012, 02:57 AM
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Impressive: the sample translation displayed incorporates several errors.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 03:47 AM
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What do you want for a quid!

Throw in an American accent and you would have to be pretty picky to give out on the strength of it?? Without hearing the translations it is hard to judge the simple polite phrases.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 07:49 AM
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Tony, you are very quick to suggest that I dump the Steves book. Have you read it? On what do you base your opinion?

I've just spent my quid on the translator program and note that it does not have any pronunciations which means it is of dubious value.

Fodor used to include helpful phrases in the language of the country covered. In this case it chose not to. So, back to my request for basic phrases with pronunciation, please.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 09:11 AM
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Wikitravel may have come to the rescue here. Have a look at this:

http://wikitravel.org/en/Irish_phrasebook#b

Cheers,
BigBlue
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Old May 13th, 2012, 09:33 AM
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I think you might find that a lot of native Irish hold Mr Steves in lower regard than the mostly American readers. Great if you like the places he likes, pretty useless if he doesn't. If people read his book exclusively then they tend to avoid perfectly good places and head off like Disney's Lemmings to places he recommends. I tend to find more accurate and less biased guide books have more value.

Hopefully his new offering has dropped the recommendations for Illegal acts like pulling in wing mirrors and stupid acts of putting learner plates on rental cars.

Does the App actually have a speech centre for giving audio of the translations. if not then the picture showing the volume adjustment is misleading. (possibly RS approved?) ;-)

http://www.lexilogos.com/english/gae...dictionary.htm
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Old May 13th, 2012, 09:40 AM
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Not bad. I could quibble here and there, and I am not sure the pronunciation suggestions are always clear, but for a bit of harmless fun, it'll serve you well enough.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 12:33 PM
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Tony, note that I use Steves as one of three. Each has its own uses. Rick is good on allocation of time as well as providing effective ways of getting around in towns or from place-to-place. He has offered some very good tips for us in many places. We never use his lodging or food recommendations as his tastes are far different to ours. Steves by himself is no more reliable as a single source than Fodor or virtually anyone else.

On our upcoming four-week trip around the entire island we are going to visit places not covered by either Fodor or Steves but we're creative enough to find the information we need.

Re the Translator App, so far all I can find is that it will take a word or phrase and translate it on the screen period full stop. There are no buttons I have found to do other than those things shown on the screen for the app at the iTunes store. There is a separate app called Translator with Voice which I've just downloaded and have to experiment with before I can make any assessment about it. Unfortunately, the Translator App needs a network connection which really shouldn't be necessary if it doesn't give voice support and covers only Irish. I can understand the other one, which has voice support and multiple languages, needed a connection.

Fyi, in my research on the topic of phrase books I've found one by Applegate at Amazon and have just purchased a used copy online for USD0.02 plus USD3.99 shipping. We'll see.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 12:48 PM
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Any help you need for Counties Clare and Galway, be happy to offer local knowledge.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 02:21 PM
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Much appreciated, Tony. We've got good plans in place for both counties and are comfortable with them. This will be our second visit to both.
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