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Paris suburbs: just a photo essay of something you'll never see

Paris suburbs: just a photo essay of something you'll never see

Old Dec 4th, 2009, 01:05 PM
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Paris suburbs: just a photo essay of something you'll never see

I know that just about nobody is interested in seeing where King Zog I of Albania is buried, but I figured I might as well take advantage of the wonders of the internet to show you something that you will never bother to go see (and there is no reason for you to ever go there anyway).

A lot of you have too much time on your hands (Hi, Palenque!), so you might as well take a look at this little report of what I did this morning: http://tinyurl.com/yjbgbua
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 01:17 PM
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Fascinating and haunting. Thanks.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 01:23 PM
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I should mention that I once spent an afternoon looking with my husband's aged aunt for her husband's grave in a little cemetary in Frielassing, Germany, only to learn that we were in the wrong cemetary after being quizzed by those who kept saying "graben ur Urn?" trying to help us find the remains. It isn't always easy and you don't have years to do it.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 01:36 PM
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Kerouac, I am speechless. This has to be your best one yet.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 01:36 PM
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I have hunted for tombs more than once with friends. I think it is always an interesting thing to do, because you see much more than you came to see.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 01:41 PM
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The 'zone of desolation' certainly was that but I woulda just called it "grubby". Thanks for the ride!
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 01:55 PM
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kerouac - i think you should publish your works. they are amazing and an interesting thesis. i enjoy your pics and commentary. thanks
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 02:35 PM
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ah, kerouac - you managed to elicit smiles and tears simultaneously. merci bien, and I have no doubt that Donna made a great choice of administrator for her final affairs.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 02:48 PM
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This was very sad but yes, haunting!
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 02:49 PM
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Those who avoid cemeteries will never know what they have missed by turning their eyes away from this photo-report, kerouac.

Your accurate and moving prose and pictures remind me of days my wife and I spent looking for graves of friends buried in Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Windswept rows of crosses stretching almost to the horizon. The web-site of the American Battle Monuments Commission unlocked doors in our search.

These graves hold friends from our high-school days. We took photos and sent them home to their relatives, people who either had no money to travel or perhaps no interest in recalling their blood relatives lost in World War II.

Please keep up your good work. You are gifted.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 04:06 PM
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So very moving, kerouac. Many thanks, EJ
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 04:34 PM
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Very touching. I kept wondering if there were any pebbles on the Jewish grave markers, such as you see on the crosses of David in the American cemetery in Normandy.

I used to wander around a cemetery I happened upon in Portland, Oregon. I would wonder about the people's lives, especially those who died very young. I always had so many questions.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 05:27 PM
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Thank you for sharing this journey.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 06:57 PM
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So very sad but so awfully interesting. Thanks Kerouac, your stories are amazing.

Schnauzer
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 07:33 PM
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kerouac-----I was never that interested in graves until I veiwed your recent post. I found it fascinating.

Here's my question for you. What do you do for a living? You put so many interesting posts on Fodors, how do you have time to work?
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 07:33 PM
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thanks, Kerouac. That was eye-opening. I guess I like cemeteries, though I never go to "visit" my family graves, I wonder why.

I do like the custom of leaving a small pebble on the grave marker, and I do it when I am at a cemetery nearby to visit graves of friends, because I like to see that others have visited and remember.

Do you have other stories like this? Or even close? Can you point the way to them? I am intrigued.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 09:45 PM
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Thank you all for your kind words.

I work in an airline office, but circumstances have mostly prevented me from traveling for the past 5 years, so I try to make up for it with little voyages to nowhere.

For those interested, you can find some other stories at the same site where this story is.
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Old Dec 4th, 2009, 09:51 PM
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Very sorry to read about your friend, who sounds like someone we'd really like to have known. Great photos, as always.
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Old Dec 5th, 2009, 03:53 AM
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........ thank you so much, Kerouac. Another wonderful snippet of living in Paris of which you do so well.
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Old Dec 5th, 2009, 05:01 AM
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Kerouac - I hope you felt all the better for having taken this journey into the past. I know I'm glad you shared it with your Fodorite family.......it was lovely to see. The air looked clean & crisp.
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