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Northern Ireland currency

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Jan 19th, 2015, 12:46 PM
  #1
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Northern Ireland currency

I am confused on the currency used in Northern Ireland. Is it the same as that used in London/UK? If not, can they be used interchangeably in both countries. We are traveling both places, so I want to make sure we are prepared. Thank you!
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Jan 19th, 2015, 12:50 PM
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Same British pound sterling but bank notes may have Northern Ireland on them (like in Scotland - banknotes from Bank of Scotland circualte but are really British pounds - except that IME some folks down in England for some reason do not like to take them so change them for British Bank of England banknotes before going off to England.

Anyway there is only one currency in the United Kingdom- the British Pound. Ireland the Republic of course is on the Euro like most of the E U.
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Jan 19th, 2015, 03:05 PM
  #3
 
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From the tourist website
http://www.discovernorthernireland.c...uestions-A2146
Wiki about pound Stirling notes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banknot...pound_sterling
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Jan 19th, 2015, 04:44 PM
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Coins are the same in Northern Ireland and in the rest of UK, so no problems there.
Bank of England notes circulate freely in NI. Notes you get from ATMs and in change in NI are mostly local notes printed in NI. They can be used in England, but some merchants are reluctant to take them, so get them changed for Bank of England notes at any bank in UK, free of charge. You may be able to get them changed at Northern Ireland banks, but that depends on availability of BoE notes at a particular branch (usually not a problem).
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Jan 20th, 2015, 01:18 AM
  #5
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Northern Ireland notes are rarely seen in the rest of the UK and you will have problems using them. Shops will not want to take them, although it should be possible to exchange them in any UK bank. It would make sense to exchange any you have before leaving the Province.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 06:57 AM
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Why won't English merchants and folk circulate the Northern Ireland bills if they are indeed as they indeed are in effect British Pounds? don't understand why the reluctance to take them - seems just like Euro coins - each country has a different front on them but they circulate willy-nilly everywhere. Ditto for Scottish bank notes based on the Pound.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 08:20 AM
  #7
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That's a masterful summing up of the situation flanner
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Jan 20th, 2015, 08:59 AM
  #8
 
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"Many people are unfamiliar with them and can't easily tell if they're forged"

That was the reason given by a shop keeper when I tried to spend some in England a few years ago.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 09:34 AM
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I still have pound notes from a trip to London. Any problem with Belfast taking them? I never thought it would be a problem till reading this.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 09:42 AM
  #10
 
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Bank of England Pound Notes were phased out over 20 years ago, the last time I saw a Scottish Pound Note was about a decade ago.

They, like other old UK bank notes are not legal tender anymore and would have to exchanged at the Bank of England, Bank of Scotland or Bank of Ireland depending on who issued them originally

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banknot...pound_sterling for the current bank notes in the UK
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Jan 20th, 2015, 09:52 AM
  #11
 
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I am guessing that flpab means he/she has English notes in general, not that they are specifically the £1 face value notes. So they should be fine.

Btw, I cannot comment on Irish notes as I've not seen or used them in England, but I have used Scottish notes down south multiple times without any problems and think that most retail outlets know what they are and happily accept them now - so that bit of advice is probably somewhat out of date.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 09:53 AM
  #12
 
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Btw here is a £1 note for your instant nostalgia fix

https://aipetcher.wordpress.com/2012...of-the-1-note/
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Jan 20th, 2015, 10:35 AM
  #13
 
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That's a masterful summing up of the situation flanner>

hey hey to that - Fodor's most erudite writer - always compellingly writ. Good show ole chap!
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Jan 20th, 2015, 11:38 AM
  #14
 
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<>

No, it's not and the analogy is daft. Only the Bureau of Printing & Engraving may print US dollars and only the Treasury Department may issue them, private banks have no such right unlike in the UK.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 01:23 PM
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All bills and coins circulated by the U.S. Government are legal tender and have to be accepted as so - apparently not true in the U.K. if folks can refuse them they are not 'legal tender' in my mind - that said the reasons flanner gave seem salient.
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Jan 20th, 2015, 02:37 PM
  #16
 
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I've been over to Northern Ireland several times and used notes brought back here in Northern Scotland without any problem at all, in England the same notes were viewed with suspicion a couple of times and refused once, and on that occasion I left the food and drinks on the counter and walked out.

My partner's father has a shop in Carlisle (Cumbria) and I've just spoken to him regarding bank charges, apparently he banks English, Scottish and Northern Irish notes together and doesn't incur any charges.

Both Northern Irish and Scottish notes are Legal Currency (approved by the UK Parliment) all over the UK, neither are Legal Tender (a very narrow term) in England, and no notes, English included, are Legal Tender in Scotland or Northern Ireland.

FlannerUK, "Scotch people" instead of Scottish? Why use a term that's universally regarded as being derogatory? You're clearly far too well read not to know that.
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Jan 22nd, 2015, 08:16 AM
  #17
 
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"Scotch" it's a drink not people.
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Jan 22nd, 2015, 08:21 AM
  #18
 
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I've earned money in Scotland and NI. I've never had problems spending it in the UK, but I generally would also avoid the discussion. All it takes is a silly person to make a good holiday irritating (a bit like retail prices in the US not ncluding tax )
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