Name that pasta.

Jul 29th, 2003, 04:55 PM
  #21  
 
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Pasta "in a bag" in Venice. You cook the pasta and then put it in aluminum foil with garlic, olive oil and shellfish. You close up the bag and put it into the oven to roast for 10 mins. Fabulous.
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Jul 29th, 2003, 05:19 PM
  #22  
 
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Man, this thread is MAJOR eye candy! I'm sitting here with a napkin tucked in my collar, a fork and spoon all ready.....

It's after 1 am here, but I am soooo tempted to go whip up some of the yummy dishes you guys are describing. But ohhh the havoc it would wreak on my diet! I hope you know my thighs are glaring daggers at all of you, LOL.
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Jul 29th, 2003, 06:23 PM
  #23  
cmt
 
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Some of the kinds I especially like:
linguine (or similar) with very fresh clams or mussels, in simple garlic-wine-herb suace (no tomato);
pasta alla Norma, dressed with eggplant, lightly cooked tomato, garlic, basil, some cheese;
my grandmother's tomato and meat sauce with braciole, which I haven't had in many decades;
occasionally, when I'm in the mood for it, which is not too often, puttanesca made with anchovies and raisins and tomato and onion and garlic and capers.

I do NOT like any sauces with cream in them--find them really hard to digest and also not that interesting, and I also don't especially like gnocchi.
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Jul 29th, 2003, 07:12 PM
  #24  
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StCirq, Capo & Swalter. My recipe for pasta all'arrabiata (angry pasta) is as follows: First you must start our with a good basic sauce. In Florence we start to saute finly chopped carrots, celery & onion in a frying pan. Once soft, add garlic cloves and your crushed or chopped tomatoes. We like the Pomi brand and that is also what my mother-in-law in Florence uses. Simmer on low heat while you boil the water for your pasta (Barilla). After adding salt to taste, put your sauce in a passa tutto or a blender. Puree your sauce and put it back into the frying pan. Now all you have to do is add your aglio, olio, prensimolo & pepporincino - that is garlic, more EVO, finely chopped Italian parsley & some red chili flakes. I will give you a tagliatelle alla noce (tagliatelle in a creamy walnut sauce) after I have something to eat!
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Jul 29th, 2003, 07:19 PM
  #25  
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Txtree & Stcirq. Depending where you live the small Manilla clams are great in pasta. A somewhat close second to the Italian gems from the sea.
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Jul 29th, 2003, 07:22 PM
  #26  
 
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Calamari....You have my recipe!!!!
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Jul 29th, 2003, 08:34 PM
  #27  
 
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OK, Calamari, I follow you completamente until you say we need prensimolo - sorry, I studied Italian for molti annni but I don't know this term. Please advise....
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Jul 29th, 2003, 08:46 PM
  #28  
 
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Calamari - Thank you for the recipe. That is my favorite pasta and I've never made it. Even in Germany, it can have a little zing to it and be great. I can't wait to try it.
We had a great pasta at Marina Picolo in Manarola-ravioli in a crean pesto sauce.
Our favorite everyday pasta is tomato, basil garlic, shallots and olive oil that my husband makes. Thanks for the recipe. CJ
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Jul 29th, 2003, 08:49 PM
  #29  
 
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One of the most memorable pastas I ever had in Italy (oh, where to begin!) was at Lake Como in a small trattoria at lunchtime. They called the sauce crema rosa, which was basically tomato sauce with cream, plus garlic. It was served over penne, garnished with fresh parsley, and was simple but divine.

My grandmother, who grew up outside Napoli, served a traditional dish on Christmas Eve that we continue serving to this day. It was spaghettini with a sauce that consisted of crushed anchovies (canned), cooked down with garlic, olive oil and pepper added, and walnuts. Yummmm. A little of the sauce goes a long way, but if you're an anchovy fan, you'll love this recipe!
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Jul 29th, 2003, 09:33 PM
  #30  
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Stcirq. Of course you do not know what that is because I was not focusing on my spelling. The word I meant to write was prezzemolo (Italian parsley). I do apologize.
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Jul 29th, 2003, 09:36 PM
  #31  
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JanT. Your recipe sounds great. I can smell it already. It almost sounds like a salsa verde without the verde. I would never had thought to add walnuts. Wow! What a great surprise ingredient! Thanks for sharing.
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Jul 30th, 2003, 10:19 AM
  #32  
JMM
 
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farfalle with garlic, olive oil and pesto - just thinking of it makes my mouth water.
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Jul 30th, 2003, 11:28 AM
  #33  
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Pesto seems to be a real favorite here. This is my pesto recipe.

In a blender, small food processor or with a mezza luna chop up four cups or more of fresh basil, as many garlic cloves as you can stand and add your olive oil (EVO) until liquified.

Grate about a cup or two of fresh parmigiano and toss that in as well. After you have toasted about a cup of pine nuts and allowed them to cool, toss those in too. Add salt to taste LAST. Adding EVO as needed, give it one last whirl to incoporate everything together and pour it over your pasta. Mix it up and enjoy!

By the way, it is also good on crostini and on sandwiches. My kids love to take veg & pesto sandwiches to school. Now what wine shall we have? I get the best basil from Trader Joes when my home supply is deleated. They also have great pine nuts and EVO.
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Jul 30th, 2003, 01:37 PM
  #34  
 
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Calamari, where is the walnut sauce recipe? I am so hungry now!
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Jul 30th, 2003, 02:00 PM
  #35  
 
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Calamari,
one of my favorite summer potato salads is made with small red potatoes, red onion, and steamed green beans , all mixed together with pesto sauce!
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Jul 30th, 2003, 02:08 PM
  #36  
ira
 
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Hi Calamari,

With your pasta con pesto I suggest either Est!Est!Est! or Frascati.
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Jul 30th, 2003, 03:44 PM
  #37  
 
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Rucula salad topped with thin slices of parmeggiano and prosciutto, and plenty of olive oil.

Fetuccini al funghi secchi

Ravioli di zucca with gorgonzola cheese.

Or simply spaghetti al pomodoro.
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Jul 30th, 2003, 04:16 PM
  #38  
jmv
 
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I'm partial to ligurian pesto pasta with the addition of green beans and potatoes. Sometimes I make it with little chunks of chicken sauted in garlic and butter also.

Pizzocheri (sp?) pronounced Peetz och ery with the accent on the second syllable, rather than pizza cherry as I kept saying, is a buckwheat pasta baked in a casserole with swiss chard and several cheeses and butter that is a specialty at Vecchia Varenna on Lake Como. It's a real favorite. We even had the good fortune to be in Camogli for the pizzocheri festival. Now that's pasta.
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Jul 30th, 2003, 05:54 PM
  #39  
 
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Someone posted a recipe for pizzoccheri on one of the Italian forums, and there were actually endless discussions about it. This person grew up eating this dish and loves it. It seems to have a FRIGHTENING amount of butter and, just from the recipe, didn't seem appealing to most of us who've never tried it. Was it something you fell in love with on the first taste, or have you always eaten it?
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Jul 30th, 2003, 06:29 PM
  #40  
 
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Calamari: Do you have a recipe for that incredible creamy walnut sauce they serve in Liguria (and maybe elsewhere)?
Thanks for the arrabiata recipe - it's my kids' hands-down favorite sauce, and they'll probably find your version a little more authentic than mine. They do like it on the spicy side - do you think the dried red pepper flakes or the "wet" ones (called cherry peppers on the label most often) you can buy in a bottle are more "authentic?"
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