Munich for 2 days : help required

Old Jan 1st, 2011, 01:36 AM
  #1  
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Munich for 2 days : help required

I will be in Nuremberg in end-March for a business visit. Will have 2 days to spare (Friday & Saturday, i.e. Apr 1 & 2). Thinking of making a quick trip to Munich for 2 days (can reach there on 31st evening, and have 2 full days of 1st & 2nd April). During my last trip to this region, I visited Rothenburg ODT and Bamberg, which were both excellent. Wanted something different this time, so thought of Munich.

Need advice on things to do in Munich for 2 days. I like architecture, old towns, beer, food, culture, etc but am not much of a museum person. Any advice would be welcome on how to utilize the 2 full days.

Also need advice on a good locality to stay, and possible hotel suggestions (about 80-100 euros per night). The best rated hotel on Tripadvisor is Hotel Laimer Hof on Laimerstrasse (near the Nymphenburg castle and Hirschgarten). The price suits my budget, but need advice if it is a good area to stay. I will not have a car, and will be relying on public transport in Munich. Also, will be arriving and departing Munich by train at the Hbf. Please keep this in mind when suggesting a good locality, near to the "touristy" areas.
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Old Jan 1st, 2011, 05:03 AM
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>a good area to stay
Safe and nice. You'll have to walk a few meters to Romanplatz for the tramway downtown or the 51/151 bus to Laim S-Bahn station or Moosach. Good hospital nearby just in case.
Romanplatz has Rewe, Tengelmann for food and a nice wine store. Also a post office. I'd recommend the Poseidon at Maria Ward Street for good greek food.
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Old Jan 1st, 2011, 07:07 AM
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Munich - Dachau takes a half day though some are aloof to take in these sobering type sites. The Olympic Stadium area can take another half-day with the BMW Exserience (or some car company) there - museums galore - in nice weather be sure to stroll thru the famous Englischer Gardens and hit the Chinese Pagoda's outdoor beer hall - one of the biggest I've seen in Germany and serving the tradtional German beer hall foods and suds and ambience.
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Old Jan 1st, 2011, 07:30 AM
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How about a half-day trip to see the Neuschwanstein & Hohenschwandau castles ? Are they worth the journey, or should I stay put in Munich ?

I know many people visit the Dachau concentration camp, but these "sobering type" sites are best avoided IMO. The Englischer Garden sounds good.
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Old Jan 1st, 2011, 07:32 AM
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In that price range (if my memory serves), you might also want to consider the Hotel Mercure. I stayed there for a few days last July, and it was nice for a more budget minded hotel. I also think breakfast was included. The most important issue for me is location, and this hotel is located quite close to Marianplatz. You will not need to access the S-Bahn to get to most of the locations you want to visit. This hotel is easily accessible from the train station, and if you are traveling light, you could walk if you wanted to (I did, and I think it took 10 or 15 minutes).

I would recommend taking the walking tour of Munich on your first morning there. It will give you a good orientation for the city, hit most of the main attractions, and leaves from Marianplatz. It takes about two hours. Your hotel will have information on how to access the tours.

Munich is a great place to visit and there are a number of great things to see and do. I think a quick search on Munich trip reports here will help you find the things that you would like. And the walking tour will allow you to decide what to focus on while you are visiting. A couple of highlights from my perspective: the view of Munich from Alter St. Peter, which is just off of Marianplaz; the Viktualienmarkt; having a beer at Der Pschorr (at Viktualienmarkt); the English garden behind the Residence; eating at Spatenhaus an der Oper (at Residenzstraße 12) and Zum Dürnbräu (Durnbraugasse 2). If you are looking for a higher end restaurant, I would recommend Broeding (Schulstraße 9) -- it is a bit out of the way from the old town, but it is excellent, make reservations on line. There are great churches to see, most of which you can hit on the tour, and many people go through the Residence (I did on my first trip to Munich, but have not in subsequent trips).

Have fun!

TN
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Old Jan 1st, 2011, 07:44 AM
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Indiancouple,

I would not make the side trip to the castles. I believe this will take up an entire day with bus transport back and forth. And while they are interesting to visit, there is so much to see and do in Munich. If I were going to encourage you, it would probably be to Salzburg, Austria, or some of the smaller towns closer in to Munich. But I think this whole idea is best avoided as your time in Munich is short.

I would also second PalenQ's comment on the Chinese Pagoda. It is a great beer garden if the weather is nice.

TN
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Old Jan 1st, 2011, 08:30 PM
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Good suggestions everyone. Please keep them coming.

tn, I have already been to Salzburg; much as I loved the city, I would want to explore someplace different. Your other suggestions are great. Will look into Hotel Mercure also.

PalenQ, how would you compare the beer-garden at the Chinese pagoda vs Hirschgarten or Hofbrauhaus ?
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Old Jan 1st, 2011, 09:04 PM
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In case you want to eat Indian food in the city center just a couple of blocks from the elegant Maximilian shopping street: http://sitar.indisches.com/directions.html
I remember seeing bold political campaign signs all over Munich that spelled "Kinder Statt Inder" which was rallying the local voters to support German children instead of supporting Indian foreign immigrants. I don't know how the locals perceive Indian travelers,but I would be upset if I were an Indian.
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Old Jan 1st, 2011, 11:51 PM
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We only need to be politically correct, when it's against poor people. This was about wealty immigrants that were applying for the best jobs, so the industry could increase competition for those jobs. They didn't come here, because they are smart people realizing there are better jobs somewhere else. Many visitors don't realize that what they think is racism "only" is a society has different social classes.
There is a generally negative attitude about US tourists, who are seen as people that "have too much money to spend and do that in a rather unintelligent way", but the same doesn't apply to tourists from India.

So no need to worry if you're an indian tourist.
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Old Jan 2nd, 2011, 04:23 AM
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Not worried logos; have been to Germany too many times, and never faced any problems with anyone.
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Old Jan 2nd, 2011, 07:36 AM
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The Hirschgarten is the best imo of the 3 you mentioned. It's frequented mainly by locals. You can chose and wash your mug yourself in the fountain. If you sit too close to the deer if may be a bit smelly, but then where else can you "have a beer in between deer". The Chinesischer Turm has too many tourists and is too expensive, the Seehaus beergarten a few meters further north has better customers and doesn't cost more. If you cross over the pedestrian bridge 300m nortbound from there, the next beergarden is the "Hirschau", it has almost no tourists, but it's not as scenic.

The Hofbräuhaus is not a place I would care to go.
I would go zum Flaucher or in die Waldwirtschaft in Großhesselohe, those places are more genuine that the Seehaus or the Chinesischer Turm. The Waldwirtschaft is somewhat out of town. And of course there's also the Hirschgarten.
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Old Jan 2nd, 2011, 12:34 PM
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<<There is a generally negative attitude about US tourists, who are seen as people that "have too much money to spend and do that in a rather unintelligent way">>

You've got to be kidding logos, Americans are generally the most favored/privileged foreigners in Germany, and Germany is my favorite country to visit.
Another reason I was concerned for indian couple was the fact that one of my colleagues who was of Indian descent was followed and physically harassed by three drunken youths in Munich. He was quite shaken up but didn't make a police report. It could happen anywhere even in the US but still it's good to be cautious/aware.
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Old Jan 2nd, 2011, 12:42 PM
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Well, the point is that whoever you ask about US tourists (native, immigrant and others) that's the usual response you get about US tourists. They spend money where others would just ask for the price and say "no thanks", anybody else would look elsewhere and care to bargain.

Just an observation, but I believe they're correct? Everyboy shares that view, so there must be something to it.

I wouldn't go to Neuperlach or the Hasenbergl alone at night but who does anyway.
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Old Jan 2nd, 2011, 09:37 PM
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Logos you have a good point, the same Indian colleague is very good at bargaining. His motto is: everything is negotiable. He got his room price at the Munich Kempinski significantly reduced after complaining intelligently to the hotel manager and I can see that happening as the standard rooms at the Kempinski are rather old and tired. Most of us in the US are not comfortable at bargaining especially in a foreign country.
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Old Jan 3rd, 2011, 10:54 AM
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Bargaining isn't part of American culture except in a few specific situations - we negotiate the prices of cars and things in flea markets, but not much else. As a result, most of us aren't really comfortable bargaining for things. We ask for a price and if it seems reasonable, we pay that price. If not, we don't buy the item. In countries in which baraining is really common, we make the effort, but probably still pay too much because we aren't very good at this type of negotiation. So if that reflects negatively on us as Americans, I guess it is what it is. Like everybody else, we are products of our culture and can only do so much to overcome our cultural norms when we are in other countries. However, if I were a German, I think I'd be really happy to have non-bargaining Americans visiting my country and pumping more money into the economy than they need to. You guys are the recipients of our excess spending. Be happy.
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Old Jan 3rd, 2011, 11:00 AM
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No, it's more like, "How can anybody be so ... to overpay that much. It must be Americans". Excess spending is not welcomed, since it makes people demand more.
Well, that's how it is.
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Old Jan 3rd, 2011, 11:06 AM
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logos--what kinds of items or services are acceptable to bargaining?
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Old Jan 3rd, 2011, 12:24 PM
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I stayed at the Laimer Hof last July and really liked it a lot. The folks that run the hotel are supremely helpful and friendly and the place is quite comfortable. The only slight drawback is that it is a ways outside the city center but you are walking distance from the Tram that will take you into the city and stops at some interesting stops along the way such as the Augustiner Keller which is another really nice beer garden and hall.

Regarding Hofbrauhaus, Chinese Tower, and Hirschgarten I agree with what Logos said. Hirschgarten is by far the better of the three in terms of beer, food, and atmosphere. IMO Augustiner is the best beer of the big breweries in Munich and Hirschgarten serves it as well as the Tegernsee beer that is also quite good. The other bonus for those staying at the Laimer Hof is that Hirschgarten is walking distance from your hotel.

As mentioned above I also recommend you stop at the Augustiner Keller that is off Tram 17 at Hopfenstraße stop if you have time.

Here is a nice online beer guide to Munich that lists all the beer gardens and halls.

http://beerdrinkersguide.com/BDGWebsite/Mainframe.html

It's very handy to have the book with you while in Munich as well since it gives you all the Sbahn and Tram Lines to take and where to stop to get to all these places.
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Old Jan 3rd, 2011, 12:28 PM
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My partner and I spent two days in Munich in September, and everyone is correct....there is too much to see in Munich to leave it for a day, although Neuschwanstein is fabulous. If it's possible to squeeze in one more day in that region of Germany, then go for it. Otherwise, save it for another trip.
We stayed at the Englishergarten Gastehaus, which is right next to the English Garden. It was quite reasonable and quaint in a grandmotherly sort of way. We used tube and bus to get around with no trouble, but it is a ways from the Marienplatz and other central tourist sights. I would definitely recommend some of the Munich walking tours, which leave from the Marienplatz at 10:00 a.m.. My partner did the Munich city walking tour, and I went on "Hilter's Munich" walking tour, which I found to be very interesting and informative. We also visited the Hofbrauhaus, which we found to be lots of fun. Touristy?...yes, but then we're tourists! At our very international table there was a German couple from Hanover, a young couple from S. Korea, a single man from Munich, and the two of us from Indiana. We drank, ate,sang, and laughed together. The music was fun, and exactly what one would expect in Munich. It is historic and quite a sight to see. If you're in Munich, you need to at least have a beer there.
We did visit some of Munich's museums,which were world class, but then you said you didn't care for museums. I would not rule out Dachau. It is a short trip from the city (Munich Walking Tours offers a very affordable tour, using public transportation). Although I didn't go there this trip, I have been there in the past. It is a sobering and unforgettable experience, and one that everyone who visits the area should have. So it makes you uncomfortable?.....I personally think it is right to visit and pay homage to the memory of those who died there and vow that such atrocities never happen again. In the event that you decide to stay at the Englishergarten Guest House, there is a small, but very atmospheric beer garden just across the street. We ate there several times and had good food, good beer, and good times.
Munich is not my favorite city in the world to visit, but it does have a lot to offer and certainly warrants two days of
your life.
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Old Jan 3rd, 2011, 12:36 PM
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scatcat, food isn't. For the rest, just be polite and genuine, anything goes once it gets a little more expensive. Just don't expect any luck at those chain hotels. There are even "apps" that give you current internet prices for the items you want to buy locally. . That helps a lot!
Germans and others always make fun about US tourists in Egypt and elsewhere paying $200 for "local art". It's a running gag.
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