Milan for lunch ?

Mar 17th, 2001, 09:25 AM
  #1  
Mark
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Milan for lunch ?

I will be arriving in Milan in the mid morning in late April. I will be driving to Lucca and I hope to make short stops in Parma and Modena on the way. I would also like to spend a couple of hours in Milan, maybe have lunch there before I journey on. What should I see? Where should I have lunch? I figure I only have about 3 hours.
Thanks,

Mark
 
Mar 17th, 2001, 09:46 AM
  #2  
Tina
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Some of the notable sites in Milan:

-- Duomo : Unusual in that it's built in Gothic style, I think it's the 2nd or 3rd largest of its' kind;
-- La Scala Opera House & Museum : During my day/night visit to Milan, I wasn't able to get tickets, but you can tour thru it during day;
-- Sforza Castle (Castello Sforzesco) : I thought this was an interesting & eclectic museum collection. Includes some art, furniture, one of Michelangelo's unfinished works, a Pieta; and finally,
-- DaVinci's Last Supper (Cenacolo) which is in the Santa Maria delle Grazie.

I had a short visit in Milan --- it's Italy's most modern city and is more business & industry focused. As it was severely damaged during WWII & then rebuilt afterwards, it doesn't have the ancient ruins or as much character like Italy's other major cities. You don't sound like you have a real burning urge to see anything specific here, so I'd strongly suggest you skip the Milano visit & continue on your journey.
 
Mar 17th, 2001, 10:01 AM
  #3  
Tina
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Mark:

In lieu of lunch in Milan, here’s some ideas for Lucca. I wish I’d spent more time there than my ˝ visit in October. And I just happened to be researching Lucca for whenever I next return to Italy & came across this information from the following website:

http://italianfood.about.com/food/it...kly/blrev2.htm
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Philip's Suggestions for Lucca and Pisa ----- From Cosa Bolle in Pentola, the Newsletter:
------
La buca di San Antonio
In the centre of Lucca, a stone's throw from the San Michele (one of the World's most lovely churches), is a restaurant not to be missed. La Buca has been renowned amongst the Lucchesi since - who knows when? Renowned not just for its unsurpassable cooking, but also for the ambience, which starts with the trumpets on the ceiling and perhaps ends with the Vin Santo they leave on your table because you would like to stay longer than they would (Do lock up when you go!).
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La Mora
Just north of Lucca (7 km), on the road to Abetone, is the little village of Ponte a Moriano; cross the bridge and go up a bit and you'll see a sign to the right for La Mora. DO NOT pass it by! Sauro keeps a good table, so good that "La Guida Italia"rated him as one of the "Top 50"in Italy! And it really is a good place to eat - Sauro is friendly and views his eminence as a bit of a laugh... but if you want to taste Tuscan as it should be.... then his table d'haute Menu Toscana, which stretches over 15 different offerings, is for you.
-------
La Nina
Up above Lucca are the hills of Montecarlo (to the East), where some of the very best Tuscan White Wines are produced, and "where you drink well, ergo you eat well"(QED!). Few restaurants any where, on a Summer's day, or any other day, can rival La Nina. Imagine... sitting out, in the hills of Tuscany, being served, under a superb arbour, with the most excellent food and wine......... Could heaven be better? .........Try it!
--------
Trattoria da Olivo - Lucca
On the 3rd Sunday of every month, Lucca holds its "Flea/Antique"Market. It ranges through all the streets near the Duomo di San Martino - it's huge - whether that makes it 'good' is something else! But it covers the gamut of Junk! Great Fun! Sometimes you can even take home a puppy.
Just up the Via Fillungo - Lucca's "Oxford St/ Fifth Ave", on the same day, on the right in the little Piazza dell'Arancio, the Lucchesi artists display their work - including Giampa(u)olo Bianci (who has an International reputation) - some of which is very worthwhile. If that morning, having viewed and wanting time to think about whether 'you'd really like that one when you got it home' and whether 'you really feel like spending that amount', you were to walk on through the Piazza, on your left you'll see the Trattoria da Olivo - a loggia surrounded by tall box hedge. This is where Antonella will serve you with an excellent Zuppa di Pesce or Insalata Mare Caldo, followed perhaps by Spaghettini al(lo) Scoglio and then, how about a superb Branzino? She doesn't only do fish - but she does fish so well, I've never considered going for the meat side of the menu. A good coffee, some of Antonella's almond cracknell.... Wash it all down with a good dry Buonamici White....with to end, maybe a Vin Santo... and the picture you chose .............well, you'll be ready to take a decision on that - and bargain with the stall-holders all afternoon!
 
Mar 17th, 2001, 10:29 AM
  #4  
Mark
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Tina,
Your suggestions are wonderful. My mouth is watering just thinking about it. I stayed in Lucca one night last year and ate at Trattoria da Oliva
and had the best meal of my trip. It was wonderful! I'll home base from Lucca, for four nights and then I'll be going on to Positano, any suggestions for there?
Thanks so much, I'm printing your reply and I'll be taking it with me.
 
Mar 17th, 2001, 11:19 AM
  #5  
Tina
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--
Lucca AND Positano? Oh Mark, TAKE me with you . . . .
 
Mar 17th, 2001, 11:22 AM
  #6  
Mark
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Tina,
Sorry it's my honeymoon!
 
Mar 20th, 2001, 08:54 AM
  #7  
Claudia
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Ok that true in Milan we don't have so many "ruins", but we have S.Ambrogio Basilica from 13th century, S.Maria della Grazie, Leonardo's Last Supper, the Guastalla Gardens, the Public Gardens near Porta Venezia etc..
Having lunch in Milan is a very good idea IF the weather is nice (in April, this could be). If you arrive by car, I strongly suggest you to park you car at S.Donato parking next to the subway station. the subway will take you directly to Duomo. Then you can visit the Cathedral, the Galleria, and Piazza della Scala. Once in Piazza della Scala you can walk down Via Verdi and in 5 minutes you'll be in Brera, one of the most attractive areas in Milano. No kidding, you'll think you are in Paris there. There are plenty of cafés with table on the boardwalk. My favorite restaurant is Rigolo, Largo Treves corner of Via Solferino, ph.02 86463220.Have Fun. PS If the weather is bad, it's better if you skip Milan. It can be vary sad.
 
Mar 24th, 2001, 08:56 AM
  #8  
Tina
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She's a lucky gal. Have great time --buon viaggio!
 
Mar 24th, 2001, 12:03 PM
  #9  
Mark
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Claudia, If the weather is good, I'm there! Thanks for the tips.
caio
 
Mar 24th, 2001, 12:34 PM
  #10  
Marsha
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My husband, sister and her husband and I will be spending several days in Milan in August,and I am a little discouraged to learn many restaurants will be closed that month, as well as some of the negative comments of things to do while there.

I particularly like gardens and natural beauty, quiet spots. Are there any such places near Milan. I absolutely loved Lake Como in 1999, and wonder how much one could see in an afternoon? We will be going to Bellagio one day, but is it feasible to spend time another day, or would the time/cost not warrant this? We stayed at the Grand Imperiale Hotel in Moltrassio and the view across the lake was wonderful and dinner at the restaurant on the lake was very nice.
 
Mar 24th, 2001, 12:41 PM
  #11  
Marsha
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My main concern about being in Italy in August is the weather. We were in France, Italy and Switzerland in APRIL of 1999 and it was just right -- I understand that August will be very hot!

What suggestions for clothing, unbrellas, things to keep cool???????
 
Mar 26th, 2001, 06:48 AM
  #12  
Claudia
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Dear Marsha, as I said to Mark, in April Milan can be really nice...but in August...it's really hard! It's true, most places are closed, most people are on holidays, the climate is horrible: hot, humid and lots of mosquitos. For several reasons, I am generally one of the few people in town, so I think I can give some tips the most lively areas, even in August are the "Navigli", and "Piazza Vetra" plenty of boardwalk cafés and nightlife. I often go for dinner out of town (for example I have been to L'Imperialino, which is exactly the restaurant of Grand Hotel Imperiale in Moltrasio!). If you go by car, you can easily reach Moltrasio, Cernobbio and Menaggio (nearest part of Lake
Como) in 45 minutes. A very good restaurant there is IL GATTO NERO
a Rovenna - Cernobbio (CO)
Via Monte Santo 69
Tel. 031/512042 - fax 031/513560 you'd better book a table outside in advance. By train you can go to Como or Stresa (lake Maggiore). Vigevano is another lovely small town that you can easily reach by car or even by train (less than 1 hour). There is a beautiful castle (in the garden there are concerts at night)and a marvellous square. I usually go there at night to sit in HAITI Café (Cathedral Square) and have a huuuuuuuge ice-cream. Bergamo is another underestimated site: it's divided into two parts, the new town and the old one, called Bergamo Alta, which is really lovely. Well, if you need more infos, feel free to email me.
 
Mar 26th, 2001, 07:43 AM
  #13  
Jeanette
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I was in Milano for a day last week and although it rained the entire day, I had no difficulty getting to see almost all of the main sites by walking with umbrella. The people were very nice upon asking directions and I had a delightful assorted vegtable and risotto lunch at a little cafe/bar near
Santa Maria delle Grazie. I wish I would have had more time to see the S. Castle as I only got to walk around the outside courtyards because of time restraints. The mall near the Duomo is super in any weather. I twirled on the bull of Turin's testicles so I hope that means I will return to Milano some day to see more of the castle museum area. When I saw some passerby's twirling on their heel- I had to ask why and it took me a while to find someone to explain it to me in English. The trees (star magnolia) in the garden courtyard of Santa Maria delle Grazie were in full bloom. Regardless of the gray skies and rain, it did not look sad to me but just very busy and full of it's own energy.
 
Apr 4th, 2001, 06:55 AM
  #14  
Marsha
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I just wanted to move this up to the top so that I might get further input, particularly on clothing (silk or other quick drying, non wrinkle material) and NECESSARY things to take, but Milan for lunch is hardly a topic to get THAT information.

Any specific recommendations for lunch and dinner in Milan would also be appreciated very much.

 
Apr 22nd, 2001, 08:33 AM
  #15  
Moira
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I am in almost the same situation as Mark, and found Claudia's post to be particularly helpful, so I hope she's still around! We will arrive at Linate late one Thursday morning in May and be taking a train to La Spezia and staying in Lerici that night, so we won't have much time to linger, but it seems a shame to pass through Milan without at least seeing the Duomo. Is it realistic to expect to be able to take the bus from the airport to the train, drop our bags, and walk around Brera, have a bite to eat, then take a 3 hour train trip? It sounds tiring just writing the question, but then again we do have to eat at some point and we've never been to Milan.
 
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