Melton Mowbray pie

Oct 4th, 2008, 10:59 AM
  #1  
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Melton Mowbray pie

I'm sure that there was a forum member whose family came from Melton Mowbray.
He/she will be pleased to know that the local pie now has European protection
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/l...re/7652487.stm
MissPrism is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 01:38 AM
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Pity that it all came to late for Cheddar!
bilboburgler is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 08:20 AM
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Pork pies could be significantly improved if they didn't have that hideous jelly bit between the pastry and the meat.
RM67 is online now  
Oct 5th, 2008, 08:58 AM
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Not so RM67.... I throw away the meat and pastry and eat the jelly.
stevelyon is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 09:06 AM
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Pork pies could be significantly improved if they didn't have that hideous jelly bit between the pastry and the meat. >>>>

Go immediately to your nearest police station and hand yourself in and ask to sign the Food Offenders' Register.
Cholmondley_Warner is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 09:12 AM
  #6  
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We can get the real McCoy here but would I be shot at dawn if I were to confess I like them warm? Not hot, just the refrigerated chill removed by letting the pie lie around until it is more or less room temperature.
I would also like to as Cholmondley_Warner if it is traditional to eat it with HP/Worcestershire Sauce?
tod is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 09:16 AM
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Not really - I like 'em with English mustard. But pickles are common too.
Cholmondley_Warner is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 09:17 AM
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Worcestershire Sauce is for cheese on toast. And stuff like shephard's pie where you bung a bit in without knowing exactly why.

HP sauce is for breakfasty things like bacon and egg, though I do not indulge, personally.

I think pork pies might cope with a bit of pickle, but that's about it. Heating one up sounds deadly dangerous.
RM67 is online now  
Oct 5th, 2008, 09:23 AM
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The scotch equivelent is served hot and comes with peas.

They're nice too. In fact I've never come across a pork and pastry arrangement I don't like.
Cholmondley_Warner is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 09:35 AM
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No food should have a "refrigerated chill". Reserve serving stuff at temperatures you can't taste it for that stuff Americans pass off as beer.

Bad enough serving sliced meat at uncivilsed temperatures. Serious mistake with pork pies - and simply criminal with cheese. Why would anyone want to keep cheese in a fridge anyway? Don't you people have larders?

It's just not possible to use Lea & Perrins on pork pies. Actually, a decent pork pie should have enough seasoning in the meat, a tasty enough jelly and good enough pastry not to need any sauce - but if you can't find a proper one, mustard or HP Sauce disguises the horror of those Pork Farms/Ginsters abominations they sell in petrol stations.

And since a day without a pork pie is pretty miserable and a good pork pie hard to find, often you just have to make do with the things BP and Shell sell, and slaver them in brown sauce.
flanneruk is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 09:40 AM
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Pork Pies, as far as I can determine, cannot be found in the States (SOB)!

I became addicted to them while living in England, and have missed them ever since. Don't think I have ever bitten one of the Melton Mowbray variety, however.

One can find Pork Pies in the town of Sidney, British Columbia. Every time we take the ferry to B.C. from Anacortes, WA, we make a stop at the bakery that does them. They never last the trip back to the States.

nukesafe is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 09:48 AM
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Absolutely the pork pie should be very warm with the jelly pouring into your mouth like a warm chocolate drink.

But it gets worse I understand last year LeClerc the french supermarket put Cru Lait Camembert AC in a freezer. Shocking! And I understand some people store cheese in the fridge.

Beer of course shoud be at room temperature
bilboburgler is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 09:48 AM
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Should you find yourself in Borough Market buy one of the Ginger Pig's porky pies. Quite simply the mutts nutts (hopefully not literally) and their sausage rolls have spoiled all other sausage rolls for me forever..
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Oct 5th, 2008, 09:55 AM
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Beer of course shoud be at room temperature>>>

Cellar temperature old boy. Cellar temperature.
Cholmondley_Warner is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 10:42 AM
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And in England, old chap, cellar temperature is ruddy cold! Almost as cold as my English practice wife's heart.

nukesafe is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 11:41 AM
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Hmmmm. And I wonder why so many make jokes about English cooking...
Otzi is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 12:01 PM
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Larders? Is that where you keep the lard?
Nikki is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 06:14 PM
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nukesafe -do you live anywhere near Rhode Island or SE MA?

I like this quote from the original Boston Globe story.

"It is wise to call ahead to inquire about availability or to place an order. All three Hartley's pork pie stores in Southeastern New England make their pies fresh daily, and when supplies run out, the stores close."

http://tinyurl.com/pork-pies

"Pork pies have been made for over 100 years in Rhode Island and southeast Massachusetts by Hartley's Pork Pies"

Unfortunately they don't ship, but I live local so that's not an issue -I do keep meaning to go and buy some and when I do I'll have them warm with mushy peas - YUM!!!
alya is offline  
Oct 5th, 2008, 07:23 PM
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OK Alya, I'm intrigued, have to find these now. But I'll pass on the mushy peas.
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Oct 5th, 2008, 10:40 PM
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Alya,

Thanks for the info, but I live in a tiny town in the upper left hand corner of the country -- far, far away from Rhode Island, and Hartley's delectable treats.

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