Medieval Sites in Paris

Dec 30th, 2004, 12:09 PM
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Medieval Sites in Paris

My daughter is studying Medieval Europe in school (hooray!), just in time for our trip to Paris in March. She would like to visit many of the medieval sites there.

I can reread my guidebooks, but was hoping that you all could help me come up with a quick list to start the research.

Off the top of my head, I thought of Ste. Chappelle, Notre Dame, the Cluny museum . . .

What else? Thanks!
melissa19 is offline  
Dec 30th, 2004, 12:46 PM
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When you visit the Lourve, be sure to take her to see the medieval fortress under the Cour Carrée. Here is some more information and a photo (although there is mroe to see at the site than what is shown here) http://www.louvre.fr/anglais/palais/porigine.htm

She'll love the Cluny!
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Dec 30th, 2004, 12:50 PM
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Hotel de Sens

http://www.paris.org/Monuments/Hotel.de.Sens/

It's quite near the Marais, and it will be right on your way to Berthillon.

When I was there, I only looked at the outside -- it was closed. But it looked interesting.
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Dec 30th, 2004, 12:51 PM
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In front of the Notre Dame cathedral is the Crypt of the Parvis of Notre-Dame, a dig/museum tracing the archeology of Paris from neolithic times to the present. Several layers of medieval architecture have been exposed.
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Dec 30th, 2004, 01:07 PM
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What about the tomb for Abelard and Heloise in Pere Lachaise? Were they considered to be from medieval times? (12th Century)
http://www.abelardandheloise.com/Story.html
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Dec 30th, 2004, 01:10 PM
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The Conciergerie, the St-Jacques tower, St-Germain-en-Laye, the Château de Vincennes, the Pont Neuf, the Sorbonne................
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Dec 30th, 2004, 01:15 PM
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Supposedly work started on Pont-Neuf in 1578. Finished in 1606. Maybe not quite medieval?

But I'm not splitting hairs. Would 15th century (Hotel de Sens) be medieval? The link I gave says it is, but it's almost early Renaissance.
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Dec 30th, 2004, 01:18 PM
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Before we argue about dates -- this is what Wikipedia has to say about the Renaissance:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance

It obviously started earlier in Italy.

Maybe you should ask your daughter what she's interested in seeing -- and for more specific dates.

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Dec 30th, 2004, 01:29 PM
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Well, I did debate whether to include the Pont Neuf. I know the Renaissance began in Italy, and I'm not sure when one would say it began in France, but you're probably right that 1578 is a bit late for Medieval. And since it's the oldest bridge in Paris, I guess that discounts any other bridges as well.
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Dec 30th, 2004, 01:41 PM
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It's hard to say for France. Well, Leonardo did bring the Mona Lisa with him to France (I think) and he died in 1519, and Francis I was a patron. Since some of the Loire chateaux (Chambord?) show Leonard's influence, I think it's probably fair to date the French Renaissance to the start of the 16th century, if not earlier.

In any case, it's not as if someone came and said -- Medieval is out. Renaissance is in. The styles probably gradually change from one to other. It'd be interesting to know if what style Pont-Neuf is in (I don't know, nor do I know if this is a correct or relevant question to be asking).
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Dec 30th, 2004, 02:13 PM
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Hi melissa,

Numbers 11 & 13 Rue Francis Miron are half-timbered houses dating from about 1580.

They might qualify.

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Dec 30th, 2004, 03:03 PM
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Church of St Julien-le-Pauvre, is 12th century
nearby rue Galande and rue de la Bucherie are also at least that old, as are other streets in the 5th
The original part of the St Germain church is older than that
Ste Chapelle is 12th century I believe

also
Salle des Gens d'Armes in the Conciergerie


around Notre Dame streets like
rue du Cloitre Notre Dame are also among the oldest streets in Paris

The Cloitre des Billettes (concerts are held there sometimes) is one of the few intact medieval buildings in Paris, it's on rue des Archives in the Marais.


elaine is offline  
Dec 30th, 2004, 03:04 PM
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Great ideas, everyone, thank you!

I think the class is in the 11-1200s at this point, but should go further into the "late" middle ages by spring break. I did plan to check with the teacher.

Regardless, I can say it's medieval and she'll happily go along to take pictures.

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Dec 30th, 2004, 08:56 PM
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The Pont-Neuf was built under HenriIV, which was at the end of the Renaissance. But near St. Paul there is an exposed wall dating from the time of Philippe-Auguste.
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Dec 31st, 2004, 06:26 AM
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The Arenes de Lutece (near the Jardin des Plantes) is a 1st Century Roman arena.

Is that too early?

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Dec 31st, 2004, 08:00 AM
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Michael, Can you tell me what street the old section of wall can be seen from?
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Dec 31st, 2004, 08:38 AM
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It's between the St. Paul church and the Seine, near what I believe is called St. Paul village. It has a linear park along it, which might help identifying it on a detail map of the arrondissement (which I will have available back home in a couple of days).
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Dec 31st, 2004, 08:49 AM
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I forgot to add St. Denis with its Romanesque crypt and the French king's tombs.

When I studied French literature in graduate school, all of the sixteenth century was seen as part of the Renaissance. Marot was a transitional poet between the Medieval period and the Renaissance. In the Loire architecture, Langeais is considered the last of the Medieval castles, and the changes Louis XII had done on Blois were already influenced by the Italian Renaissance.
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Dec 31st, 2004, 08:50 AM
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mclaurie,

great sites! i'm sure we'll have a project coming up next month. i'm learning as much as she is . . .

i've passed the links on to our teacher as well.

happy new year everyone!
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