Louvre Photography?

Old May 23rd, 2002, 07:34 AM
  #1  
roy
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Louvre Photography?

Hi,
Can anybody confirm whether photography is allowed within Louvre museum or inside the other museums and inside Notre Dam cathedral etc.
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 07:42 AM
  #2  
Liz
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I could barely see the Mona Lisa for all the camera flashes last year. Nobody seemed to care...
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 07:53 AM
  #3  
David
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Photography is allowed in a surprising number of museums and churches in Europe...however in most cases flashes are forbidden and this is enforced.

Take low light film!!
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 08:20 AM
  #4  
xx
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Unless you are the world's best photographer, your pictures will never do justice to the artworks. Though non-flash photography is permitted in many museums, you'll do better to just buy postcards.
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 08:33 AM
  #5  
m
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flash isn't allowed but from what i saw, not enforced. i used 800 film in decent slr camera and photos came on quite well (w/o flash). a basic point and shoot may not work as well. I also like to buy a nice book with good photos when I visit museums or major sites.
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 08:45 AM
  #6  
elaine
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Louvre website says "no flash" as m said, but as said, flashed are used all over the place. Unless you have a very sophisticated camera (I don't), post cards are the best bet, although once I managed a really great shot of Venus de Milo, and with no people in it.

The Louvre is one place where in some galleries there is a lot of natural light on clear days, and I've gotten some great pics with 200 or 400 film without flash.

As you enter most places, there will be signs and drawings of cameras to indicate what is permitted and what is not.

I have a file on Paris with some of this info; if you 'd like to see it, email me.

 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 09:03 AM
  #7  
Marc David Miller
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Even though I have several hundred art books (many of which contain images of works I have seen in museums) I always disagree with those who say that you should just buy a post card instead of taking a photo.

First, many works are not reproduced on post cards. Second, my own photos often capture the artwork in context--either how it is mounted, or with a person standing next to it to give a sense of size, something you almost never see on a post card (or in an art book).

I've used everything from digital cameras to high end rangefinders with fast lenses to low-end point-and-shoots with slow lenses and have always been satisfied with the photos (although I highly recommend using 800-speed film for lighting consideration).
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 09:15 AM
  #8  
Billie
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I hate it when I see "clueless" people taking flash photography in restricted areas. It's so rude and classless -- those rules are meant to protect the artwork, yet some idiot always thinks his/her poorly framed shot is more important than protecting such treasures. Get some low light film and manually set the shutter speed if you want to get your own shot. If you don't know how to do that, then you should buy the postcards because you'll never get a comprable shot on your own. Also, it blows me away when people take flash photos at night of objects a hundred feet away. Most flashes only work at about twenty feet. Then these people wonder why they have a bunch of black photos that didn't come out. Does anyone understand the laws of physics?
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 10:23 AM
  #9  
David
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Billie is cranky, but 100% correct on both points
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 10:47 AM
  #10  
dan woodlief
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I agree with Marc. Postcards are fine if you can't take the pictures yourself or as souvenirs. However, they do not capture your experience. As Elaine said, the Louvre does have some areas with good natural lighting where you can get nice shots of a few famous sculptures without needing a flash or even very fast film (maybe 400).
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 10:53 AM
  #11  
Shannon
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You may use flash photography inside the Notre Dame unless they are having a service. I would also go to the top and take photos from that angle on the outdoor walkway. The Louvre is so bright during the day, you don't need a flash even if it were permitted. You can also photograph the works at the Musee D'Orsay, and the other cathedrals in Paris.
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 05:48 PM
  #12  
Nancy
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I use 200 or 400 film (frankly, I can't really tell the difference) and got a great picture of the Mona Lisa (I bought a postcard just in case and tossed it) and it showed I was really there which is important to me. I always turn off the flash where not allowed but often, there is enough light. One great picture I got was of Napoleon crowning himself - the postcard showed the whole scene but my picture while cutting off some of the extra people was much better - more intimate. Anyhow, I never been anywhere in which I couldn't take a picture (of course, except where a church service was going on).
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 06:10 PM
  #13  
pat
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Saw some Japanese people doing flash photography of the Mona Lisa. A museum employee came over and scolded them.
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 07:51 PM
  #14  
Howard
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I just returned two days ago from Paris, where 800 film worked perfectly in both the Louvre and d'Orsay!
 
Old May 23rd, 2002, 11:21 PM
  #15  
roy
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Hi,
Thanx to Marc, Elain and others for very "illuminating" responses. I have a reasonable SLR. I shall carry some 800 films, though I had stocked mainly 400 films. And, Billie, in his own way, has hit the bulls eye.
 
Old May 24th, 2002, 09:22 AM
  #16  
dan woodlief
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Welcome back, and I hope you will be sharing your photos soon Howard.
 
Old May 24th, 2002, 09:49 AM
  #17  
alyssa
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I think the only thing we weren't allowed to photograph were the crown jewels. I had both a vivitar for advantix film and a digital, I must say we got some excellent pix with the digital and it was only a 1 megapixel camera.
 
Old May 24th, 2002, 10:33 AM
  #18  
liz
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Some of my favorite pictures that I have taken inside of museums are of the people. Whether it's the artists that are sketching or a group of school children looking in awe at a massive painting. Art means different things to diffent people and I like capturing how people enjoy and appreciate what they are looking at. You also get pictures of the surroundings. The Louve itself is a work of art.
 
Old May 24th, 2002, 10:48 AM
  #19  
Jim Tardio
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You hit the nail on the head, Liz. It's the people interacting with the art that makes a great photo.

If you want a record of the artworks, I think postcards, a book, or the pre-shot slides offered for sale will provide you with that.

But yes, Roy, photography is allowed in all of those places. For the record, everyone I saw at the Louvre was using flash with the Mona Lisa. But flash is definitley a no-no with artwork...it looks harsh anyway.

Paris photos:
http://www.jimtardio.com/paris,france.html

 
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