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Looking for a Cotswold's area recommendation for tea.

Looking for a Cotswold's area recommendation for tea.

Mar 28th, 2013, 10:56 AM
  #1  
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Looking for a Cotswold's area recommendation for tea.

We will be spending three days in the Cotswold's. I always enjoy charming places for a proper tea. I would love some recommendations. Thanks!
LoisL is offline  
Mar 28th, 2013, 11:23 AM
  #2  
 
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We've stayed at the Swam and Bibury Court in Bibury , also the Lords of the Manor in Upper Slaughter and enjoyed all 3 , We'vestayed at a few more but I forget their names as it has been quite some time ago>
Avalon2 is offline  
Mar 28th, 2013, 12:05 PM
  #3  
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Thank you Avalon, for your suggestions. We have already made arrangements for our lodging. Now I am looking for favorite spots for tea or a meal in the area. Thanks again.
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Mar 28th, 2013, 12:27 PM
  #4  
 
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We had a nice cream tea at the Bantam Tea Rooms in Chipping Campden. http://www.bantamtea-rooms.co.uk/

Lee Ann
ElendilPickle is offline  
Mar 28th, 2013, 09:52 PM
  #5  
 
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The most popular afternoon tea provider in the Cotswolds, by several gazillion miles, is Huffkins in Burford, Witney and Stow.

Don't know what the poster means by "charming": but Huffkins is where real people go for a sustaining (and by the absurd standards of formal tea prices, almost affordable) tea after a proper walk or if entertaining their families. The company also intermittently caters tea and meeting sandwiches for 10 Downing Street.

The Bibury Court offers the normal preposterously overpriced formal tea. But in all the years our dog's spent afternooons swimming in the river nearby, we've never stumbled over anyone actually eating it. The hotel's more than happy to serve us a decent cup or six, in nice china, after we need reviving (superintending his swimming can be exhausting) for little more than a local greasy spoon would charge.
flanneruk is offline  
Mar 29th, 2013, 02:28 AM
  #6  
 
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We've pulled off the road to farmhouses posting "cream teas" signs. Not the fully whack but usually lovely scones, jam, clotted cream and fabulous strong tea. This was 10-12 years ago, hope "Health and Safety" hasn't closed them down.
Cathinjoetown is offline  
Mar 29th, 2013, 03:00 AM
  #7  
 
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For a nice half-full day out, I can recommend Tetbury - there are several tea-shops, but our favourite is Vera's down towards the church. We first went there with my Aunty Vera and couldn't resist going in there. they serve light lunches as well as very nice teas.

Though Aunty is sadly no longer with us, we've stopped there several times since, and it's always very friendly with newspapers to read, good coffee, cakes, sandwiches, and of course, cream teas.

In Tetbury itself there are lots of nice [though quite expensive] shops, an ncient Butterwalk and quaint little streets, and the church. Further afield there is Westonbirt Arboretum which is a lovely place for an afternoon's stroll amongst the trees.

hope you have a lovely time, Lois!
annhig is offline  
Mar 29th, 2013, 06:28 AM
  #8  
 
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Huffkins in Burford may not be the most charming of tea shops although it's nice enough. It is, however, the best in the Cotswolds. I'll admit I haven't been to the others.I always buy some baked goods to take with me. Can't resist.
historytraveler is offline  
Mar 29th, 2013, 06:39 AM
  #9  
 
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We had a memorable tea at Buckland Manor, a large and very nice old house-hotel near Broadway. Our B&B hosts recommended this place as offering a special experience and it was.
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Mar 29th, 2013, 06:45 AM
  #10  
 
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Oh, I forgot about Barnsley House. If you're interested in gardens, patrons at the restaurant can also tour the gardens, which were created originally by Rosemary Verey, a renowned gardener.

We always look at gardens in the UK. It's something the British do so well.
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Mar 29th, 2013, 08:11 AM
  #11  
 
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Either Hufkins (I stop at the Burford one just about every time I'm in the area) . . . or at some of the National Trust properties you are probably visiting.

For instance Hidcote Manor and Snowshill - they do cream teas in the cafes.
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Mar 29th, 2013, 08:59 AM
  #12  
 
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We had an enjoyable light tea at The Close in Tetbury. It was served at a table in the beautiful garden on a warm summer's day by a friendly and helpful member of staff. Our tea cost £4.95, but there is also a more substantial High Tea for £18.95 as well as collections of sandwiches and other choices.
chartley is online now  
Mar 29th, 2013, 09:17 AM
  #13  
 
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Annhig mentions Tetbury and Westonbirt Arboretum. If you're walkers and would like to include both those places in your visit, a section of the Monarch's Way goes between them passing along the back of Highgrove House. Not far but far enough if you do a round trip, to have tea in both places. Looks to be about 4 miles on the path, tearoom to tearoom, on OS Explorer map #168.
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Mar 29th, 2013, 09:57 AM
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" Not far but far enough if you do a round trip, to have tea in both places."

You can't get into Highgrove without an appointment, and have to use the entrance on the A433 (which isn't a pleasant walk). The rear entrance on the footpath, though it looks open to walkers, is scheduled as a forbidden place under the Terrorism Act. The notices are politely forbidding, and though breaching them is unlikely to be lethal, the route's doubtless got enough sensing devices to lead at least to a significant amount of time wasted in uncomfortable interrogation by the security services.
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Mar 29th, 2013, 10:00 AM
  #15  
ira
 
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Very helpful.

Thanks, folks.

ira is offline  
Mar 29th, 2013, 10:15 AM
  #16  
 
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Flanner, interesting, sorry to hear it. I walked that path with a friend and we didn't see a soul. In fact I forgot until I was past it that it went past Highgrove. So presumably the prohibition you mention has been initiated in the last several years. Too bad, it was a very nice walk. We continued on from Westonbirt to Alderley and visited Marianne North in the churchyard.
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Mar 29th, 2013, 10:20 AM
  #17  
 
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Flanner, on rereading your post I wonder if you thought I was recommending dropping by for tea at Highgrove. I meant using the path that goes past the back of it, going from Tetbury to Westonbirt. If it's open for just walking past Highgrove then I still recommend it.
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Mar 29th, 2013, 01:13 PM
  #18  
 
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I also love Huffins. See link for photos.
https://plus.google.com/107482947791...0/photos?hl=en
ayeaye is offline  
Mar 29th, 2013, 05:56 PM
  #19  
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Thank you all for your helpful suggestions. I hope to get to some of the recommended spots, and will post an update after our trip.
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Mar 30th, 2013, 12:49 AM
  #20  
 
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The path's open. There's just a hundred yard stretch edged by notices politely implying you'll be machine gunned if you leave the path.

The right of way didn't and doesn't go through Highgrove, and it takes a great deal more than stalker nutters or a few terrorists to allow a right of way to be rerouted. A similar path almost across the front lawn at Chequers (the prime minster's country house) for example has stayed apparently unchanged - except for the installation of umpteen thousand invisible sensing devices - through decades of Nazi bombing, IRA attacks and Al Qaeda publicity stunts.
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