Londonites...could you report...

Sep 28th, 2002, 02:41 PM
  #1  
me
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Londonites...could you report...

...about today's demonstrations?
 
Sep 28th, 2002, 05:18 PM
  #2  
xxx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
It is LONDONERS - for cripes sakes!
 
Sep 28th, 2002, 06:00 PM
  #3  
Ben Haines
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
On their site http://www.independent.co.uk/story.jsp?story=335779 The Independent daily newspaper of London writes thus.

Ben Haines

-----------------------
Country invades town in a show of force (and ferrets)
By Paul Peachey
23 September 2002

Campaigners claim to have sent a defiant message to the Government yesterday when an estimated 400,000 farmers, hunters and rural workers joined one of the biggest protests held in London.

But the Government said it was pressing ahead, without delay, with plans to introduce a fox-hunting Bill. The march organisers warned that the country would "erupt in fury" if the Government ignored its demands on hunting.

The Countryside Alliance claimed that more than 400,000 people turned up for the Liberty and Livelihood march, which used two routes through the centre of London. The Alliance claims that the protest was the largest "by a mile" that the country had seen, surpassing the CND demonstrations of the early 1980s and the later, bitter disputes over the poll tax. The Metropolitan Police estimated the numbers at 300,000.

Fox hunting dominated the march, which passed along Whitehall and past Downing Street, but farmers complaining about low prices and the Government's handling of the foot-and-mouth outbreak also joined the throng that disrupted central London all day. The marchers arrived in 2,500 coaches in response to a huge publicity campaign.

John Jackson, the chairman of the Countryside Alliance, said: "Anybody who thinks this is just about hunting must be living on a different planet from the rest of us." However, hunting was a litmus test for the Government to show willingness to deal justly with rural issues, he said. "If they make the mistake of doing something that's unjust, I have no doubt that the countryside will erupt in fury," he said.

Despite the presence of 150 anti-hunt protesters in Parliament Square, the march was peaceful. It was split in two because of the expected crowds, with starting points at Hyde Park and Blackfriars Bridge. Both began at 10am and people were still passing down Whitehall at 5.30pm.

The two routes converged in Whitehall where protesters were urged to fall silent as they approached the Cenotaph to demonstrate respect and the strength of their feeling. The organisers spent an estimated £1m, some of it on giant screens along the routes displaying live pictures of the protest.


 
Sep 28th, 2002, 06:01 PM
  #4  
Ben Haines
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
On the site http://www.independent.co.uk/story.jsp?story=335779 The Independent daily newspaper of London writes thus.

Ben Haines

-----------------------
Country invades town in a show of force (and ferrets)
By Paul Peachey
23 September 2002

Campaigners claim to have sent a defiant message to the Government yesterday when an estimated 400,000 farmers, hunters and rural workers joined one of the biggest protests held in London.

But the Government said it was pressing ahead, without delay, with plans to introduce a fox-hunting Bill. The march organisers warned that the country would "erupt in fury" if the Government ignored its demands on hunting.

The Countryside Alliance claimed that more than 400,000 people turned up for the Liberty and Livelihood march, which used two routes through the centre of London. The Alliance claims that the protest was the largest "by a mile" that the country had seen, surpassing the CND demonstrations of the early 1980s and the later, bitter disputes over the poll tax. The Metropolitan Police estimated the numbers at 300,000.

Fox hunting dominated the march, which passed along Whitehall and past Downing Street, but farmers complaining about low prices and the Government's handling of the foot-and-mouth outbreak also joined the throng that disrupted central London all day. The marchers arrived in 2,500 coaches in response to a huge publicity campaign.

John Jackson, the chairman of the Countryside Alliance, said: "Anybody who thinks this is just about hunting must be living on a different planet from the rest of us." However, hunting was a litmus test for the Government to show willingness to deal justly with rural issues, he said. "If they make the mistake of doing something that's unjust, I have no doubt that the countryside will erupt in fury," he said.

Despite the presence of 150 anti-hunt protesters in Parliament Square, the march was peaceful. It was split in two because of the expected crowds, with starting points at Hyde Park and Blackfriars Bridge. Both began at 10am and people were still passing down Whitehall at 5.30pm.

The two routes converged in Whitehall where protesters were urged to fall silent as they approached the Cenotaph to demonstrate respect and the strength of their feeling. The organisers spent an estimated £1m, some of it on giant screens along the routes displaying live pictures of the protest.


 
Sep 28th, 2002, 06:02 PM
  #5  
Ben Haines
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
On the site http://www.independent.co.uk/story.jsp?story=335779 The Independent daily newspaper of London writes thus.

Ben Haines

-----------------------
Country invades town in a show of force (and ferrets)
By Paul Peachey
23 September 2002

Campaigners claim to have sent a defiant message to the Government yesterday when an estimated 400,000 farmers, hunters and rural workers joined one of the biggest protests held in London.

But the Government said it was pressing ahead, without delay, with plans to introduce a fox-hunting Bill. The march organisers warned that the country would "erupt in fury" if the Government ignored its demands on hunting.

The Countryside Alliance claimed that more than 400,000 people turned up for the Liberty and Livelihood march, which used two routes through the centre of London. The Alliance claims that the protest was the largest "by a mile" that the country had seen, surpassing the CND demonstrations of the early 1980s and the later, bitter disputes over the poll tax. The Metropolitan Police estimated the numbers at 300,000.

Fox hunting dominated the march, which passed along Whitehall and past Downing Street, but farmers complaining about low prices and the Government's handling of the foot-and-mouth outbreak also joined the throng that disrupted central London all day. The marchers arrived in 2,500 coaches in response to a huge publicity campaign.

John Jackson, the chairman of the Countryside Alliance, said: "Anybody who thinks this is just about hunting must be living on a different planet from the rest of us." However, hunting was a litmus test for the Government to show willingness to deal justly with rural issues, he said. "If they make the mistake of doing something that's unjust, I have no doubt that the countryside will erupt in fury," he said.

Despite the presence of 150 anti-hunt protesters in Parliament Square, the march was peaceful. It was split in two because of the expected crowds, with starting points at Hyde Park and Blackfriars Bridge. Both began at 10am and people were still passing down Whitehall at 5.30pm.

The two routes converged in Whitehall where protesters were urged to fall silent as they approached the Cenotaph to demonstrate respect and the strength of their feeling. The organisers spent an estimated £1m, some of it on giant screens along the routes displaying live pictures of the protest.


 
Sep 28th, 2002, 06:20 PM
  #6  
me
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I get it, I get it. Is this the original fox hunting post?
 
Sep 28th, 2002, 06:26 PM
  #7  
Ben Haines
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Yes, the original bolting post: it ran away with me.

Ben Haines
 
Sep 28th, 2002, 07:33 PM
  #8  
ah
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Sorry Ben , but I think they were asking about today's anti-war protest not the countryside alliance march from last week
 
Sep 28th, 2002, 08:59 PM
  #9  
me
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Yeah. That's what I meant. I just wondered what the general mood was, given the size of the demonstration.
 
Sep 28th, 2002, 09:19 PM
  #10  
me
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Londoners. You are right. I stand corrected.
I just found this ain today's Guardian:

http://www.observer.co.uk/iraq/story/0,12239,801239,00.html

Still curious about the local mood.
 
Sep 28th, 2002, 10:31 PM
  #11  
Ben Haines
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I do not think a country can have a general mood: we have a ranfe of moods and opinions. Nor can I tell you those are: I should need to sit aound in pubs in various parts of the countty, or of London, and that would make for a fairly dull week.

What the media say is a different matter, and BBC radio four and the Independent newspaper carry views that are fifty fifty for or against war on the U S terms, but pretty much for war on U N terms.

Let us see how many times this message replicates.

Ben Haines
 
Sep 29th, 2002, 03:19 PM
  #12  
me
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Thanks Ben for your response. I think your polling style might make for a rather interesting week, and for rather interesting sampling. I assume this is the stuff of pub discussions, not that there aren't other, credible forums for discussion.

I found this in today's Guardian. http://www.observer.co.uk/iraq/story/0,12239,801226,00.html

Apparently 90% said the international community should allow UN weapons inspectors 'one last chance' before military action.

Although 75 per cent of people said that the 'world would be a safer place' if Saddam was overthrown, nearly 80 per cent were against unilateral action by America, whether or not it was supported by Britain.

So, polls can be tricky things.



 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:36 PM.