London hotel tax is 20%

Aug 22nd, 2014, 06:34 AM
  #61  
 
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I guess it is a cultural thing, I'm against massive tipping and taxes that "appear" at the cash desk but when in the states I just go with the flow. When in europe, sales tax is generally around 20%, clearly stated and there are no other extras, go with it.
bilboburgler is offline  
Aug 22nd, 2014, 08:22 AM
  #62  
 
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>>No, I am not anti London/British. I am anti fxxking high tax, that's all.<<

Nice (!)

So I guess you would't be happy visiting anywhere in Europe (so save $$/££/€€ - stay home with your nasty attitude )
janisj is offline  
Aug 22nd, 2014, 08:23 AM
  #63  
 
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Patrick - ha that took me a second!
jamikins is offline  
Aug 22nd, 2014, 08:39 AM
  #64  
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Hi janisj, if you are happy to pay high tax, it's your opinion, which I respect. Like I mentioned in other post, you are welcome to pay more tax voluntarily for your personal income. I am pretty sure your government would love it.
Go ahead, just do it already.
enjoy.
jz166 is offline  
Aug 22nd, 2014, 08:56 AM
  #65  
 
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I'm anti countries where hiding the taxes & other charges is expected, where high tips are expected, where I would be "taxed" at twice the current level for healthcare, where children shooting themselves or others is acceptable for "freedom"
dotheboyshall is offline  
Aug 22nd, 2014, 09:02 AM
  #66  
 
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>>if you are happy to pay high tax, it's your opinion, which I respect. <<

Who said I am happy about high taxes. But you whole attitude - My guess you haven't traveled much. Just don't be an ugly American -- okay . . . .
janisj is offline  
Aug 22nd, 2014, 09:09 AM
  #67  
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now you are lecturing me that I haven't traveled much.
seriously, which kind of person are you?
pay your double VAT already.
jz166 is offline  
Aug 22nd, 2014, 09:34 AM
  #68  
 
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No one's "happy to pay high tax". But ranting on a travel forum isn't going to change anything.
suze is offline  
Aug 24th, 2014, 08:49 AM
  #69  
 
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ya gotta pay the piper - happy about it or not - when you get a coffee or ber at a cafe you pay a lot more than here - because wait people are treated with a living wage and benefits - mandatory in most jobs in France and other European nations - it is kind of like the VAT tax - your high prices pay for these generous benefits - restaurants are so so cheap in the U S comapred to say France because we pay our help there a minimal wage and no benefits.
PalenQ is online now  
Aug 24th, 2014, 09:35 AM
  #70  
 
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I guess the great thing about going abroad is that things are different there. Some people struggle with that.
bilboburgler is offline  
Aug 24th, 2014, 09:39 AM
  #71  
 
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>>when you get a coffee or ber at a cafe you pay a lot more than here - because . . . <<

Not IME. A lot depends on where one live in the US and where one is traveling.

A glass of wine or a beer or a coffee in a nice restaurant in the SF Bay Area will cost as much or more than the same in Paris -- once you add the tax/tip, it can be considerably more. Maybe in northern Michigan you pay less.
janisj is offline  
Aug 24th, 2014, 03:46 PM
  #72  
 
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Janis on a whole Europe is much more expensive than as a whole is the I S - and a main reason is the McDonalds have to pay a living wage and for benefits - duh - those things affect price. I'm not comparing SF or NYC to Europe in general so in those cases you may well be right.

I see you have not traveled on the Continent to many normal places. Look up the Big Mac Index - which says what a Big Mac will cost in each country and you'll see Europe is right up there at the top and the U S well down the list.
PalenQ is online now  
Aug 24th, 2014, 04:01 PM
  #73  
 
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But I don't go to Europe to eat McDs! I don't eat the wretched things in the US for that matter. I am far more interested in the price of a macchiato and a pannini, or a half of cider and fish and chips. And I am very happy to know that my waitstaff are being paid a living wage and I don't need to perform mental arithmetic after a good meal.

And what on earth do you mean by normal places?? Last janisj TR I read she was visiting totally normal places in the UK.
thursdaysd is offline  
Aug 24th, 2014, 04:34 PM
  #74  
 
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>>I see you have not traveled on the Continent to many normal places<<

On the paint again I see -- what on earth gave you that idea? When I lived in the UK I went somewhere 'on the Continent' at least 10 times a year . . . and most were normal

>>Look up the Big Mac Index <<

Unlike some - - Ahem -- I don't have to google to decide what I think. You want to know what a quarter pounder w/ cheese costs in Berlin or Paris -- knock yourself out. Me, I prefer 'normal places' and yes, some things cost more in Europe and some things cost less.
janisj is offline  
Aug 25th, 2014, 01:24 AM
  #75  
 
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Ah the Big Mac index, the Economist only introduced this as a joke some years ago, or as they said at the time "tongue in cheek". It doesn't really give a good reflection of average costs but of miss-pricing of currencies. Still there is no dentist's index or police index etc etc
bilboburgler is offline  
Aug 25th, 2014, 01:46 AM
  #76  
 
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One of the more useful phrases that I know of relating to financial planning is "It'll all come out in the wash".

Though that might not apply to paint.
PatrickLondon is offline  
Aug 25th, 2014, 06:02 AM
  #77  
 
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For lunch today I enjoyed a tasty X-tra Long Chili Cheeseburger at a Burger King off the Autobahn.

WHERE'S YOUR GOD NOW?!?!?
sparkchaser is offline  
Aug 25th, 2014, 10:33 AM
  #78  
 
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, I prefer 'normal places' and yes, some things cost more in Europe and some things cost less.>

janis dear if you think things are about the same expense-wise in Europe as the U.S. think again and yes you need to travel more - Britain itself is to me across the board more expensive than the U.S. At my local Coney Island I can get a full breakfast of eggs, meat, toast and tateers for #358, tax included (plus $1.50 tip) - where can I find that anywhere in the U.K.

Unlike you, seemingly on a very high perhaps extravagant budget as per your many posts, I shop for food in supermarkets - this is where you see local prices not in som posh tea room or fancy cafe - the ordinary stuff that you probably never buy and thus do not realize that yes across the board things cost more even in the U K than in the U s, taken as a whole - not based on SF area where you live - yes in places like NYC and SF due to high rents prices can be higher.

But you really need to either NOW go more across the Continent - not basing something on years if not centuries ago - and you'll see with the significantr ascent of the Euro starting about 15 years ago prices on the Continent in general are significantly higher than in the average areas of the U.S.

London always gets comments here like it 'is so so expensive' - you really are off the mark on this one IME of average things in average places.
PalenQ is online now  
Aug 25th, 2014, 10:43 AM
  #79  
 
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http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living...by_country.jsp

Janis check out the cost of living index for the first half of 2014 - Norway tops the list and several European countries including the UK follow up near the top - the U S is wsy WAY down the list - you simply are missing the mark on expenses by saying it's about the same there as here.

Perhaps getting out of your kushy cacoon will bring you more in touch with the common things - like George Bush II expressing surprise at the cost of mil at a supermarket check out during the 1992 Presidential campaign!
PalenQ is online now  
Aug 25th, 2014, 10:59 AM
  #80  
 
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Sometimes I splurge and sometimes I skimp. I rent apartments and shop in supermarkets. Yes - really.

I'm not in any sort of cocoon - never have been.

People used to pay me to plan trips and one of my main briefs was to save them $$$$ So I know ALL the tricks. I can visit London for less $$ than I can visit San Francisco. You need to get out from under your bridge once in a while. And definitely get off the pant.
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