Learning Italian audio tapes

Old May 11th, 1999, 07:26 AM
  #1  
Eva
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Learning Italian audio tapes

Any suggestions for learning Italian audio tapes - the ones where they say The English, then the Italian translations? Specifically the ones that you can listen to in your car and you don't need to refer to the book for every translation. I've already bought one and it was just that.
 
Old May 11th, 1999, 08:37 AM
  #2  
anne
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Pimsleur's has the best series of the type that you describe. I've checked it and several others out of our local library. Pimsleur's has a beginning and intermediate set - 4 tapes each.
 
Old May 11th, 1999, 09:51 AM
  #3  
richard j. vicek
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Good afternoon, Eva I would continually play the tapes all the time
as long as they do not bother anyone
else, supprising what you can learn
without listening.
Ricahrd of Hickory Hills, Il...
 
Old May 11th, 1999, 10:49 AM
  #4  
elaine
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I've used the Berlitz tapes, bought them in a Barnes and Noble. They were okay, using book helpful but not necessary.
 
Old May 11th, 1999, 11:32 AM
  #5  
greg
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I have used the Pimsleur and Barrons. The Pimsleur was very good, Barrons was terrible (esp tapes.)

The Pimsleur Italians comes in levels I, II, and III. If you can find these FULL sets in library you are in luck. They are VERY EXPENSIVE to buy, over $200 each set (amazon.com had best price.) The level I is packaged in several difference varieties. If you get FULL set (16 tapes) level I, you do not need partial ones you find in retail stores, they are same with exception of sales pitches on the tape. And yes, the full set seems to be only sold by mail order.

You can do MOST by listening only. The tapes are dolby tapes and are very good quality. They do not give you script of the lesson. They do not believe you need one. They do enclose a separate book of phrases and words covered in the last tape. I disagree with the lack of written material. While the tapes are good quality, some words sounds so close to each other and do not know why you use one or the other. I consulted a fluent speaker often to get explanations. Also I got "501 verbs fully conjugated" (or smaller and cheaper "301 verbs" version if you can find one) to understand how different conjugations are spelled to help clarify what I was hearing.
 
Old May 11th, 1999, 12:17 PM
  #6  
Karen
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I agree completely with Greg. Pimmsleur's are the best, but the lack of written script makes it difficult to get the full essence. I know some French, some Spanish, so imagine my surprise to learn that "tarde" ("late" or "later" in Spanish) was "tardi" in Italian. My ear was not attuned enough to hear the difference. I am in Italy now, actually studying the language. I must say the Pimmseleur's helped a lot, but it also hindered in not "seeing" the words written.

And I also agree about Barron's. It is terrible. If you want to spend an hour learning how to say "Amanda," then go buy Barron's. What a waste of money. If you are just going for vacation, I would just say to learn the basic phrases from tapes (Berlitz, Frommer's, Fodor's, Pimmseleur's short version), you can get from Barnes and Noble or wherever. Italians are wonderfully patient, and I have had so many apologize because they didn't speak English better--in their own country. They will appreciate your just knowing the everyday phrases and when to say "Buon giorno" and "Buona serra," which, of course, varies from region to region of what time of day you actually switch from one to the other.

The main thing to keep in mind is to greet someone when entering the store, hotel, restaurant, and to say something when leaving. And what you say, again, varies, depending on the region.

A presto e buon viaggio.
 
Old May 12th, 1999, 02:17 AM
  #7  
karie
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I enjoyed "Just Listen and Learn Italian"...$29.95 at Barnes and Noble. I lived with them in my car for three or four months, and it was surprising how much I picked up. I really was able to communicate! And it was so much fun, plus I could book a room in Orvieto when the guy did not know English. My son was very impressed!
 
Old May 12th, 1999, 11:47 AM
  #8  
hcw
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Karie,
Do the 'Listen & Learn' tapes have both English & Italian, or do you have to follow a book to get the English translatiion? I'm looking for something I can learn while driving.

Thanks! Any dual-language suggestions from anyone else, less expensive than the other series mentioned here?
 
Old May 12th, 1999, 11:47 AM
  #9  
hcw
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Karie,
Do the 'Listen & Learn' tapes have both English & Italian, or do you have to follow a book to get the English translatiion? I'm looking for something I can learn while driving.

Thanks! Any dual-language suggestions from anyone else, less expensive than the other series mentioned here?
 

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