just how expensive is London

Old Mar 17th, 2005, 02:09 PM
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A challenge for you all...

Go to Amazon.com and look up an item. Note the price. Then log into Amazon.co.uk and see how much you are ripped off.

Will you be driving in England? If so, beware the price of petrol. It is the most expensive petrol i've ever seen in my life! Expect to pay about $1.75 per litre.
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Old Mar 17th, 2005, 03:32 PM
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How many litres in a U.S gallon? Is it 4.5? That would be $ 7.80 a gallon, really? Brisbanite, are you in Bris? When we went down to Oz from Thailand we found the prices there quite ok, no problems. States for us is OK, 1 USD costs us 39 Thai baht, but to get a British pound costs like 77.5 baht, that's why a lot of Eastern European countries are doing a big push in SE Asia.
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Old Mar 17th, 2005, 03:45 PM
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Actually about 3.785 liters in a gallon.
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Old Mar 17th, 2005, 11:47 PM
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So that means it costs about $6.62375 to the gallon in england.

I am from Brisbane, Australia however, I now live in Dublin, Ireland. I've made many short trips to england and have driven there.

Here are some cross rates for you..
Fuel in:
Brisbane: A$0.9/L = US$0.714/L = US$2.70/Gallon
Dublin: €0.93/L = US$1.24/L = $4.69/Gallon
London: £0.9/L = US$1.72/L = US$6.62/Gallon
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 03:59 AM
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brisbanite...

Since you are not from the US, I'm surprised that you are seeing it that way. going to amazon.com (US) vs. amazon (UK) to compare prices to determine "how you are getting ripped off" is flawed. You may be getting ripped off but you have no guage of this by comparing prices against the USD.

With this logic, whether you are getting "ripped off" or getting a bargain all depends on the exchange rate between GBP and USD. Certainly, a very American-centric way of looking at things. I earn in £ so the USD/GBP exchange rate can go to 1/1 or 3/1 and amazon.co.uk is still the same value level for me.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 04:04 AM
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>You may be getting ripped off but you have no guage of this by comparing prices against the USD.

Um, with all the currency conversion i've been performing so far in the thread it surprises me that you'd make the assumption that i'm suggesting a comparison of GBPs to USDs. I didn specifically mention a conversion would be necessary but also didn't think anyone would be stupid enough to think you could do a comparison without one.

>With this logic, whether you are getting "ripped off" or getting a bargain all depends on the exchange rate between GBP and USD. Certainly, a very American-centric way of looking at things. I earn in £ so the USD/GBP exchange rate can go to 1/1 or 3/1 and amazon.co.uk is still the same value level for me.

Not it isn't since you also have the option of ordering from Amazon.com. It may cost a little more for postage but when you take that into account it is still usually cheaper to buy from amazon.com.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 04:11 AM
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For instance,
I was recently looking into buying season 1 of star trek enterprise.

Amazon.com are selling it for $90. Amazon.co.uk are selling it for £63.74 (US$122).
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 04:20 AM
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<i>&quot;For instance, I was recently looking into buying season 1 of star trek enterprise. Amazon.com are selling it for $90. Amazon.co.uk are selling it for &pound;63.74 (US$122).&quot;</i>

Into this equation, you should also take into account that the price would be highter in the UK because Star Trek would be an imported item from the US. You would probably find the same thing, but in reverse, if comparing a British-made product being sold by a US firm.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 04:22 AM
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&gt;Into this equation, you should also take into account that the price would be highter in the UK because Star Trek would be an imported item from the US. You would probably find the same thing, but in reverse, if comparing a British-made product being sold by a US firm.


I did mention the cost of postage. Why would it cost more for an importer importing this stuff in bulk than me purchasing 1 and having it mailed?
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 04:27 AM
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For your information, shipping this item from the USA to Ireland costs exactly US$6.98
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 04:30 AM
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Regardless of postage, the UK price of &pound;63.74 would reflect Amazon.co.uk's import fees, as Amazon.co.uk would be the importer of the US product.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 04:39 AM
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&gt;Regardless of postage, the UK price of &pound;63.74 would reflect Amazon.co.uk's import fees, as Amazon.co.uk would be the importer of the US product.

So you believe it costs amazon.co.uk $30 per item to import them even though I can buy 1 item and have it imported for $7.00?

That's ridiculous. Also I think you'll find dvds/cds and such things are not imported. They're made locally.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 05:59 AM
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But who cares?

If X is Z in Y, and A is C in B, there's not a lot you can do about it if you're in Y.

London is London, accept that it is the second most expensive city in the world, and budget accordingly. As for The Connaught, it really isn't what it used to be I'm afraid, I wouldn't touch it.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 06:09 AM
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London doesn't come close to being the 2nd most expensive city in the world. Have you ever been to Tokyo or Moscow or Hong Kong?

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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 06:13 AM
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It doesn't even qualify as the 2nd most expensive city in Europe. Geneva and Moscow are more expensive than London.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 06:30 AM
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I'm merely quoting the result of a very recent survey which incorporated housing costs, Tokyo came first.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 06:41 AM
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One of the benefits of using Quicken and credit cards and, of course, keeping the old data for comparison, is knowing how much trips cost.

In November, my wife and I spent 6 nights in London and 7 nights in Paris. We spent $3670 plus airfare. The pound averaged $1.80 and the euro $1.30

The hotels in both cities were 3 star and were $756 in London and $798 in Paris and included breakfast. We averaged $85 per day for lunch and dinner. The most expensive dinner in London was $93 and $82 in Paris. Both 3 course meals with a full bottle of wine. All of our meals in Paris had full bottles of wine. In London we had wine or beer.

As a comparison,we had a specially priced lunch yesterday at the Sole Proprietor in Worcester, MA: both of us had a draft Sam Adams, clam chowder and a 1 1/4 pound lobster for $43.25 including tip and tax. The normal price would have been $20 higher. With dessert and wine it would be in the same range as our expensive meals in London and Paris.

From LHR to our hotel we took the Airbus to Notting Hill Gate and a taxi to our hotel in Kensington. Return was by Hotel Link shared van. In Paris, we used the Air France bus to and from Montparnasse. Our hotel is a short walk. Total cost was $140. We spent $68 for a shared van on returning home.

In both cities, we are comfortable using public transportation but used a taxi once in London to go from the Portrait Gallery to the Royal Academy.

We spent $168 on train tickets to Winchester and Norwich.

That leaves $762 for everything else: tube/metro, admissions, gifts for grandchildren from museums/cathedrals, film developing, etc. We don't attend the theater and our evenings are very quiet - usually, just walking.

In 1993, we spent $3980 plus airfare for a trip in the UK leaving June 14 and returning July 5. That trip included a 13 day car rental, Ford Mondeo automatic, of $390 and 6 nights hotel in London for $684. The most expensive dinner was $103. The GBP was $1.50.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 06:49 AM
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I was looking at various survays from various years...
July 2001
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/1419318.stm

July 2004
http://www.waytorussia.net/news/2004...expensive.html
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 06:52 AM
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If you'd care the read the last survey cited by yourself, it states &quot;Tokyo still on top and London moving up to second&quot;. My point exactly.
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Old Mar 18th, 2005, 07:34 AM
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We use homelink.org to coordinate all our exchanges. Oh, and did I also forget to mention we exchange cars too? I neglected to mention this substantial cost savings also.

My advice is, if you feel you live in a less desirable location, simply be less choosy. Yes, we live in Carmel, Calif., so we can swap to Maida Vale, London. But, are you aware of how many British exchangers don't live in central London? Probably 95%. They likely feel the same way you do. Who will want to exchange with us in the English countryside or the outskirts of Greenwich, London? The same goes for a dozen other European destinations.

The bottom line about home exchanging is, you either do it, or you don't. If you have a positive outlook and are flexible, you'll be globe trotting in no time.

We get curious questions from our family ranging from, &quot;Aren't you afraid of strangers stealing your stuff?&quot; to &quot;What if someone drops dead in your house?&quot;

But, year-after-year, we continue booking our month-long excursions abroad, from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico to Paris, France. And yet amazingly, nobody steals our stuff, and nobody drops dead.

If you have jitters, simply address them. It may mean parking the boat in the garage or putting valuables in a bank vault. Whatever makes you feel warm and fuzzy. Different people have different tolerances.

Home exchangers tend to be a remarkably considerate group of people. You're swapping homes simultaneously and you typically treat others' worldly possessions as you would your own.

What you get in return is:
1. Free accommodations and transportation.

2. Live like a local (we have great memories of figuring out how to work the clothes washers or radiator heaters).

3. If you have children, and you home exchange, traveling will never be the same. Home vs. Hotel? No contest. Better yet, exchange with another family and have toys and cots already waiting for you at your new home.

4. Lastly, you will travel more. This is an intangible I try to convey to people. I feel part of the reason many people travel infrequently is the overwhelming burden of planning a vacation. Blindly pick a country, city, hotel, time of year, transportation!? Instead solicit home exchangers from a target country and have 10 respond positively. Half of your trip will be planned for you. Because from those 10 prospects, they will tell you where you can potentially stay, what car you can drive, what dates are available to travel. By narrowing down your choices, travel planning seems less a monumental undertaking. I cannot stress this benefit enough. We have always had interminable wanderlust, but home exchanging has made it a recurring reality.

Apologies for the essay. It's just travel is something I'm passionate about. Whenever I can help others share the experience, I'm happy to help.
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