Jacket for men necessary in Paris

Aug 15th, 2007, 01:21 PM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 21,214
Anyone who worries about such things should dress "properly". Anybody else is probably oblivious and will get by just fine.

It should be noted that the expensive restaurants are mostly interested in how much money you will spend, not how you look. The waiters certainly don't care. The other customers will either not notice or will feel superior. Hooray for them.

No blazer for your husband. Jeez, some of these questions....!
kerouac is online now  
Aug 15th, 2007, 02:03 PM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,725
I guess the one thing that hasn't been mentioned is that when my wife takes the time to dress nicely for a restaurant meal in Paris, why wouldn't I do the same? I feel better, too. For me that means a jacket and turtleneck or sometimes a shirt and tie.
I agree wiyh Budman that it usually gets us a good table. I wear it on the plane because it is easier than packing it. According to the ground personnel, the way we were dressed is what got us bumped up to First Class.
robjame is offline  
Aug 15th, 2007, 02:30 PM
  #23  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,116
>It should be noted that the expensive restaurants are mostly interested in how much money you will spend, not how you look.<

Not really. They do have to keep their regular clientele happy.



ira is offline  
Aug 15th, 2007, 02:35 PM
  #24  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 17,549
It is absolutely amazing what people will "endure" in terms of what other customers are/are not wearing if the restaurant's service and food are good, isn't it?

Dockers..yes, people in Europe do wear them. Of course, they cost a lot more than they do in the US.
Dukey is offline  
Aug 15th, 2007, 11:07 PM
  #25  
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 5,056
Early May? He needs to take some sort of coat/jacket for the evenings, but it doesn't need to be a formal one.

Blazer? The very word makes me think of 80 year old retired military types

Oh and Chinos were popular in parts of Europe around 20 years ago.
nona1 is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 07:02 AM
  #26  
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 5,233
OK, allow me to review:
No blazer
No chinos
No ill-fitting jeans
No non-leather shoes
No ill-fitting shirts
Must have panache
Must be a big boy
Black cashmere -- yes
Plaid -- no

Got it. Packing just got a lot easier.
j_999_9 is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 07:09 AM
  #27  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,116
>Must have panache.

I buy all of my clothes from Land's End or LL Bean.

Where do I get a panache?

ira is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 07:37 AM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 4,433
ira asked: "Where do I get a panache?"

Try a bar in any French-speaking place.
Padraig is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 08:54 AM
  #29  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3,227
I would like to know what Chinos are ...because in Spanish Chinos are the people from China....
kenderina is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 09:34 AM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 469
The French dress much better than we do, certainly the women always seem to be "turned out". I always wear a sportcoat or blazer (never with metal buttons). Chinos are a sixties thing; Gap still sells them....and look what has happened to their stock. The better you are dressed, the better you will be treated in a bistrot or restaurant; cafes don't count. Buy your husband a Travelsmith sportcoat; they have all kinds of hidden pockets etc. Tell him it's a security thing.
oakglen is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 10:10 AM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 21,214
<<The better you are dressed, the better you will be treated in a bistrot or restaurant.>>

In a truly excellent establishment, that is not true. The staff know how to look beyond the clothing and thank god for that -- Russian mafia types, Lebanese arms merchants, African dictators and various other sleazeballs are always extremely well dressed in Paris, with the most magnificent and expensive garb that money can buy. The best establishments treat them as they deserve to be treated. However, there is a certain type of establishment that will fawn over them and their wallets. I hope that you are not a regular at these establishments, oakglen.
kerouac is online now  
Aug 16th, 2007, 10:14 AM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,510
Hi kenderina,

Here's a picture of some chinos for you!

http://tinyurl.com/2rre79
marcy_ is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 10:15 AM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 4,433
oakglen wrote: "The better you are dressed, the better you will be treated in a bistrot or restaurant".

Truly, I have never noticed that. I think it is sufficient to be clean and tidy. After that, treating people in a courteous way suffices (and that IS important).

There may be a small number of places that are more stuffy, but I have yet to wander into any of them (and if I did, I would wander out again -- who needs that?).
Padraig is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 11:05 AM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 36,388
Funny thing, but in the past I've often gotten into the argument here and said that while we're in Paris we never seem to wear our jackets we take. We don't do "starred" restaurants, but nice family run bistros, restaurants, and the usual brasseries. A nice shirt and slacks are fine, and without AC in many places, that's all I want to wear. But this year, during our 10 days in July it was quite cool, and we ended up wearing our casual linen sportjackets (that we bought IN Paris last summer) nearly every single night. We wore them more for warmth than for being dressed up. If it's hot he won't be out of place in or out of one at any but the fanciest of places. But it's sure nice to have one "just in case".
NeoPatrick is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 01:22 PM
  #35  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,725
Padraig and kerouac - could it be that if you never have dressed the part you wouldn't know...
robjame is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 01:29 PM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 36,388
Well, I have to say that I understand if a place has a jacket required rule, and that they certainly wouldn't serve you if you weren't wearing one or if you were seated might treat you differently.

But to be perfectly honest if a place without such a rule treats a man in a sport coat in a different way than they treat a well-dressed man without one -- then I'd prefer to find another restaurant. That's just plain silly.
Particularly if the man without the sport coat was better dressed than the man with one -- yes, I said that right and it is quite possible.
NeoPatrick is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 01:39 PM
  #37  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,116
Hi NP,

>...treats a man in a sport coat in a different way than they treat a well-dressed man without one...<

Please define "well dressed" when dining in public.

From what I have garnered on this forum, I suggest the following:

Semi-casual - bathing trunks and flip flops
Resort casual - the above with a tee shirt
Golf course casual - the above with a polo shirt
Casual - the above with long pants
Semi formal - the above with shoes
Formal - the above with a sports jacket

ira is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 01:51 PM
  #38  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 36,388
Well dressed without a sportcoat. Think Will on Will and Grace.

Less well dressed with a sportcoat.
Think Jerry Stiller on the King of Queens.

Simply wearing a sportcoat has LITTLE to do with being well dressed.
Trust me on this. I live in Florida surrounded by some of the worst polyester leisure suits and hot pink silk sportcoats worn with plaid pants and white patent shoes you've ever seen. And I'm also surrounded by trendy restaurants where hardly anyone would wear a sportcoat, but designer shirts, great looking slacks, and designer shoes abound.

And while I agree with ira's description for "levels" of formality, I don't think any of those have anything to do with the term "well-dressed". A person can be in resort casual and be a far better dressed person than someone in formal attire.
NeoPatrick is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 01:54 PM
  #39  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,116
Hi NP,

>A person can be in resort casual and be a far better dressed person than someone in formal attire. <

Please define "formal attire".


Do you mean that a guy in a "full Chicago" in Florida is no longer well dressed?
ira is offline  
Aug 16th, 2007, 01:58 PM
  #40  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,725
Neo - It happens all the time, everywhere in the world. Somebody has to get that table by the window or get bumped to First Class.
robjame is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:56 PM.