Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Is there anyone who has never been a teacher?

Is there anyone who has never been a teacher?

Mar 8th, 2001, 05:45 PM
  #1  
Former teacher, Esq.
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Is there anyone who has never been a teacher?

Here's a suggestion for a shorter thread, now that the "teacher" thread has wound around the block several times. Is there anyone here who is not a teacher, has never ever been a teacher, and is determined never to become one?
 
Mar 8th, 2001, 06:27 PM
  #2  
Danna
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
why don't you use a name and email if you want to make such a statement?
 
Mar 8th, 2001, 07:09 PM
  #3  
Former teacher
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
It's just a question, not a statement! Since I'm neither offering nor requesting help that might require further personal e-mails, there's no need for my address. I just didn't feel like putting my name, but if you really want to know, it's Carol, and I usually post under the initials "cmt" except when I'm being silly and making up names. (I didn't think this was a controversial thread!!!! So many of us are or were teachers that I just wondered if anyone WASN'T.)
 
Mar 8th, 2001, 07:56 PM
  #4  
Al Godon
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
How do you define "teacher"?
We all teach if we come in contact with other people. It might not be a formal classroom setting, but we teach by example to children, to co workers, to
customers, to just about anyone we come into situations where what we say and do is important to those watching us.

My son just today (and he is 41) was telling me how he remembered us setting him up with a pass book savings account and offering to match every 50 cents he put in with a dollar. Sure, I could have just given him the money, but we were trying to teach him about saving his money and how investments are important. His account grew some over the years until he graduated from high school. Today, he manages his money through the company pension plan wisely.

Also, he is now doing the same for his boys and teach them about savings. He tries to explain to them the way compound interest works. I think the 4th grader can follow it, but the 1st grader has yet to learn fractions.
He also coached a basketball team at the Y in a rec league for young boys.
He was constantly showing each child how to play his position. He defined roles and worked with them on minimal strategy. And he gives seminars at company meetings in his area of expertise, namely fire losses on large buildings.
So is he a teacher? I would say so.
Any father can be a good teacher for his son, or a devastating one like mine who adopted a style that robs a boy of his confidence.
And how would you classify a scout master, a Silver Beaver award winner?
He has saved more kids from deep trouble by bringing them into scouts and scouting activitiey. He constantly talks about ethical and moral issues. I doubt if we could measure his contribution. So, is he a teacher?
 
Mar 8th, 2001, 09:14 PM
  #5  
Art
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
If your not teaching anyone anything, why are you taking up space on this planet?
 
Mar 8th, 2001, 10:55 PM
  #6  
Strict Teacher
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
For your information above. The correct version of the sentence is 'if you're'. You have obviously not been paying attention to your teacher.
 
Mar 9th, 2001, 12:39 AM
  #7  
frank
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Does this this means that if you've ever taken out out the garbage you're a garbage man?
Does looking out of the window make you an astronaut?
Teachers are those paid to "teach".No matter how they define teaching, nor how badly they do it,if they are paid to do it they are teachers.
 
Mar 9th, 2001, 03:55 AM
  #8  
Lizzie
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Have never been and probably will never be a teacher! But seeing that thread made me very happy - after hearing so much about teacher shortages, it's good to know that there are plenty of people out there with the desire to teach.
 
Mar 9th, 2001, 04:15 AM
  #9  
Beth Anderson
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
actually, I am an attorney and think I may have missed my calling - I think I'd rather be a teacher or a prof. except that the pay is crummy - evidently in this world you don't get paid what you are actually WORTH - hence, lawyers make more than teachers - there is no justice. (and if I taught instead, I wouldn't be doing the traveling I now enjoy...)
 
Mar 9th, 2001, 04:24 AM
  #10  
sandy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I was an English major in college. Everytime someone found that out, the first thing out of their mouth was, "So what are you going to do? Teach?" No. No. No. No. No. Then I graduated and got a very "non-teaching" job. Now people ask me when they find out what my major was--nearly 10 years ago at this point-- "So, you were an English major. What did you think you were going to do when you graduated? Teach?" AAAAGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH!
 
Mar 9th, 2001, 04:52 AM
  #11  
Spanky
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I'm not a teacher -- but I had a great geography teacher in 4th grade who gave me the lust for travel. Of course, in Catholic school, I didn't know what "lust" meant at that time.
 
Mar 9th, 2001, 05:50 AM
  #12  
Cindy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
If I already posted on the teacher thread, can I post on this thread? Hope so.

Like Beth, I'm a lawyer. Unlike Beth, I could never be a teacher. I just can't get used to the fact that I could be talking to the group of 4th graders and someone who is supposed to be listening is talking. Or giggling. Or passing notes. After all, I spent hours putting together a presentation that I thought would be really interesting, and I am presenting it in the most imaginative manner I can. And half of the kids look bored senseless. I would come completely unhinged if I had to deal with it every day.

I don't know how teachers do it. They deserve to be paid far, far more than they are in the U.S., and I take my hat off to them.
 
Mar 9th, 2001, 06:16 AM
  #13  
Fran
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Both of my parents are retired teachers. They always told us (their four children) we could be whatever we wanted to be EXCEPT teachers! When we kids were young, and both parents were working, they could not qualify for a mortgage because their combined salaries were too low.

They were the kind of teachers you want your kid to have. They worked like crazy at their jobs, but somehow still managed to have at least one of them at all of our sporting and musical events, and always seemed to be around.

I have no desire to be a teacher, because I witnessed first-hand how much my parents gave to their students, and how little they got in return from the parents and the public. Of course, they never complained, but we could see it.
 
May 2nd, 2001, 07:20 AM
  #14  
topping
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
to join its companion thread
 
May 2nd, 2001, 10:18 AM
  #15  
xxx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Never. Every social and administrative problem associated with education becomes the fault of the teacher. They are blamed because the students have abysmal home lives and come to school completely undisciplined and unprepared to learn. Administrators want to issue teacher "report cards" yet never suggest the same sort of accountability for themselves. And all that for low pay and long hours --like the lesson plans, homework and projects they bring HOME to work on, not to mention the almost mandatory participation in extra curricular school activities.

Sometimes it seems more like glorified babysitting than teaching.
 
May 2nd, 2001, 11:12 AM
  #16  
Kelli
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Hey Sandy, I feel your pain. I majored in comparative literature, and the second most popular question people like to ask me (behind "What exactly do you compare?") is, "So what do you want to do, teach?" I respect teachers SO much, but I NEVER want to be one, so it really gets on my nerves when people assume the only job for English/literature majors out there is teacher. (I work in new media now, which is definitely not teaching.)
 
May 2nd, 2001, 11:46 AM
  #17  
xxx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Sandy and Kelli, I love English, literature, and writing classes. Yet, I don't have any desire to be a teacher (not enough patience!). What kinds of jobs would be options for me as an English major?
 
May 2nd, 2001, 12:24 PM
  #18  
SharonM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
This should make some of you happy!
As of 330pm this Monday, I'm unemployed. Before that I was a travel agent for 16 years.

Have fun with that one!
 
May 2nd, 2001, 12:27 PM
  #19  
xxx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Well, at least we'll be spared the biased opinions. What does that have to do with this post about teaching?
 
May 2nd, 2001, 12:36 PM
  #20  
Gloria
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
The only teaching I have done is given classes in Interior Design. I could never do what "real" teachers do, however. The good ones deserve a lot more than what they are getting.
My daughter, since the age of 4, has always planned on being a teacher. I am pleased that she has chosen that profession. It will give her an opportunity to be with kids, and to coach athletics. It can be a great profession for the right person.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:05 PM.