Is Prague really that bad?

Sep 5th, 2012, 08:11 AM
  #41  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
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<< act respectfully to the locals, something a lot of North Americans forget to do. They scream at locals and get frustrated easily >>

You know this for a fact, do you? Looks like you're digging yourself in deeper.

How do you know who is local to Prague and who is visiting?

I've never seen/heard anyone from North America screaming at any one else in Europe.

Your remarks are offensive.
adrienne is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 09:51 AM
  #42  
 
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What really upset me was that the Czech menu in Cafe Louvre (I think) said "service included" and the English/German menu said "service not included". My Czech friend pointed that out to me and he had a heated argument with the waiter later.
Ingo is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 10:09 AM
  #43  
 
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I've never seen/heard anyone from North America screaming at any one else in Europe
I have!
I actually had an American screaming at me in Prague train station when I was was trying to help the idiot out, still after giving him the instruction on how to get where he wanted to go by metro after explaining to him it was closer and quicker to walk i had the last laugh as he headed off to the metro area down the steps that would take him in the totally opposite direction to where he wanted to go.
Ingo ,I will look at the menu in cafe Louvre next time i am in , never noticed the difference but never been charged for service in there that i remember
unclegus is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 10:29 AM
  #44  
 
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wow, you people really have nothing else to do but to pick on every word? get a life already! I am north american and well traveled and yes @adrienne I HAVE VITNESSED AN AMERICAN SCREAMING AT SERVER IN THE RESTAURANT BECAUSE HIS SALMON WAS TOO SMALL FOR WHAT HE EXPECTED( In Prague). If adrienne is wondering how I know he was American, I actually stood up and interfiered and asked him to stop yelling at the server! On which he responded- "I am from America, it's about freedom of speech". On which I responded- "if you do not respect this city, this culture and people of this country, go back to America!". Simillar situation happened in London actually with a Canadian male, yelling at the Tube operator....the list goes on! And not only North Americans can be rude, any nationality can!
So, adrienne, before you call my remarks 'offensive' simply because 'YOU never seen/heard anyone from North America screaming at anyone else in Europe" doesn't mean it never happens. I only mentioned that so people be respictful to other cultures, that's all. And i think you are the one who is digging yourself deeper with your ignorance!If you don't know something or never heard or seen something- does it mean it does not exist? wow! get a life already!
kaza777 is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 11:24 AM
  #45  
 
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Oh for goodness sakes, all that proves kaza777 is that anyone can indulge in bad behavior.

We went to Budapest and a friend of one of our friends tagged along, she was from Austria. The woman was embarassing. This says nothing about Austrians, it does say something about my friends choice of friends now and then.

People get weird sometimes, it's a human thing.


FriendshipBay.. "I thought this thread was going to be about how to get all the other visitors out of town!"

This is the main reasons why I never answer questions like, "what's your favorite charming little city?" "where can I go that's off the beaten track?" If I do answer them, I give a pat answer that well documented.
LSky is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 12:25 PM
  #46  
 
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Kaza777, all those exclamation points make you look like you are screaming at the posters here, as does the OTT post with the all caps and "shouting" at people to get a life etc. You saw a few people being unpleasant and decided to make that "a lot". I have been traveling all over Europe for decades and have never encountered "a lot" of North Americans screaming or behaving that badly. Most Americans and Canadians behave very politely.

If you want anyone to take your posts about acting respectfully in Europe more seriously, try practicing what you preach. Act a little more respectfully on this forum.
LoungeLizardess is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 02:36 PM
  #47  
 
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We've made many trips to western Europe and one to central Europe, including Prague, rural Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary (including Budapest). We have occasionally, I'm sure, been ripped off here and there - there's one Rome cab ride that I believe took longer than it should have. We view is as part of the price for having wonderful vacations in places that we enjoy visiting, and I try not to dwell on the possibility of issues like that, or the likelihood that they've happened, and we just didn't notice.

Prague in particular, and the Czech Republic, was much the same, except that we did encounter more instances of people trying to rip us off. We had read beforehand that was the case in Prague (I don't remember where I'd read that), so were prepared and didn't mind terribly much.

One evening in Old Town Square we went for late-night drinks and a dessert. We made sure to check the prices on the menu sitting on the table, and knew they were higher inside (we have seen that in other countries too), and felt the pleasant surroundings were worth the higher price. When we were given the bill, there were some extra dessert items on it. When we asked the waiter, he said he'd made a mistake, and he readily fixed it.

Another day, we stopped at a cafe on the river for drinks and dessert. The waiter here added his own 20% tip. When we questioned him and had him take it off, he did with only a small protest.

So IMHO, based on my own experiences, yes, we had to be a little more careful and cautious in Prague, but it's a beautiful city that's well worth visiting.
Lexma90 is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 02:48 PM
  #48  
 
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To Kappa 1, yes, I have seen a few such beggars in Prague but have seen far more in Paris and other European cities. If I walk home from work in my home city of Toronto I am easily implored for spare change at least a dozen times.
lucyp is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 03:18 PM
  #49  
 
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"This is the main reasons why I never answer questions like, "what's your favorite charming little city?" "where can I go that's off the beaten track?" If I do answer them, I give a pat answer that well documented."

And why I cringed when Bobby Flay showed up at one of my favorite hole-in-the-wall places at home. Get away Bobby Flay - we don't want you here!!! LOL.
november_moon is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 03:36 PM
  #50  
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Thanks everybody, for the great responses. Don't worry. We try not to be stupid tourists. For those who expressed concern about such matters, we also don't tend to yell at people in our own home, let alone at strangers in a foreign country. ;-)
vict4ia is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 04:46 PM
  #51  
 
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You'll have fun, it's a beautiful city.
LSky is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 05:40 PM
  #52  
 
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Much of my travels in central and Eastern Europe were during the so-called iron curtain, faux-war days. I never met with anything other than respect which I also freely returned. Much later, interviewing both Czech and Slovak citizens in 1993, I found full cooperation and rare reticence, as I sought substantiating info for a book of wartime Prague
I was finishing.

Getting back to the OP's concern..it would be a terrble shame if you and your husband omit Prague from your travel plans. You want to see street beggars, come to the sunshine and scenery of Santa Monica..you'll see hands out at every turn. Go to Prague and enjoy every minute of it. If you want to take along a calculator and check every menu, that's your choice. I would rather suggest that you just enjoy yourselves, and lay back. Drink in the experience. Here in the following post are a few scanned photos of some of my vists, to "Praha the Fair"
(including brazenly crashing a Vaclav Havel press conference).
stu
tower is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 05:44 PM
  #53  
 
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The countries exist on a line between two types of pricing systems: fixed and fungible. I think there are more countries on the fungible side of the spectrum. Each system is functional in its own environment. And as long as buyers know how to play the game, they can live within each system in harmony. It is when someone from one system travels to countries using other system without knowing the change in the rule of the game, problems arise. Taxi is a clear example of this difference. It is really in limited number of countries that they are tightly regulated and one way to augment the bill is to drive around more. In most other countries, the rule of the game is whatever is negotiated or what the driver says if the rider fails to put some kind of cost bracket. A taxi is one of the fascinating part of visiting a new city. When I successfully take taxis at expected prices in a fungible price city, I feel I have mastered one aspect of visiting that city.
greg is offline  
Sep 5th, 2012, 07:20 PM
  #55  
 
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>To Kappa 1, yes, I have seen a few such beggars in Prague but have seen far more in Paris and other European cities.

LucyP, I don't know if you have looked at the photo I posted but what I meant to say is the beggars in Prague are kneeling with their head on the floor. That's how they are in Prague and is quite common. Have you seen a beggar in such a position in Paris ( as you mentioned Paris) ? I have never. And I have been to both cities many times, especially Paris.
kappa1 is offline  
Sep 6th, 2012, 04:19 AM
  #56  
 
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have a great time in Prague!
kaza777 is offline  
Sep 6th, 2012, 06:01 AM
  #57  
 
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Kappa, some beggars in Venice go in for baroque positions as well. I never give anything to them, it looks so manipulative.
tarquin is offline  
Sep 7th, 2012, 02:01 AM
  #58  
 
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We really enjoyed Prague last year and are returning in November.

We used public transport and a transfer service from the airport so no issues there.

We had no issues with prices in the restaurants we chose.

We had a private guide who gave us some very good advice which was helpful.

We found most residents to be gracious and helpful.

We have been scammed or almost scammenedin plenty of places in Europe and elsewhere. Prague was no worse than many.
kfusto is offline  
Sep 7th, 2012, 02:33 AM
  #59  
 
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> Kappa, some beggars in Venice go in for baroque positions as well ...

Most don't I suppose? I have not noticed such so far in Venice. I travel there at least once a year, just like Prague. Maybe next time.
kappa1 is offline  
Sep 11th, 2012, 07:49 AM
  #60  
 
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I almost got pick-pocketed in Paris and in Milan. Not in Prague. But I was "on guard" because I had heard similar stories. My husband lost his camera in Prague. We walked back to the last souvenier shop we were in and could not find it. Went to the ice cream shop that we visited after the souvenier shop and it wasn't there. Stopped at the sovenier shop again on our way back to the hotel and there it was, on a shelf! Don't know if someone had previously "found it" and put it back or if we missed seeing it on our first search. Whatever the circumstances, we were happy to get it back!

My brother's credit card was "taken" by the ATM machine in Prague. Good thing he was able to get money from another source.

Prague is definately worth seeing.
amberkat is offline  

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