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Is it just me, or does perfume bought in Paris smell better?

Is it just me, or does perfume bought in Paris smell better?

Aug 29th, 2007, 03:55 PM
  #1  
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Is it just me, or does perfume bought in Paris smell better?

I am almost out of my Madamoiselle Chanel and told hubby not to buy me anymore because I will be in Paris in November. For some reason, it just smells better when I buy it there. Am I just being silly, or is there really a reason why Parisien perfume smells better to me when I purchase it in Paris?
Dottee is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 03:59 PM
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I dunno Dottee - a simple loaf of bread tastes better so I guess perfume can smell better.
Come to think of it, I have always noticed my wife's Guerlin more in Paris.
robjame is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 04:02 PM
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Yes, you're just being silly.
Robespierre is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 04:03 PM
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Ahhh, a hopeless romantic! Your wife is a lucky lady...
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Aug 29th, 2007, 04:14 PM
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Dottee, I think it does because it's fresher. French woman buy alot of perfumes compared to Americans who only wear it for special occasions. The shelf life is not long in Paris. Here it could be sitting for months. IMHO.
cigalechanta is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 04:17 PM
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Dear Robespierre:

Sigh...what a disheartening reply. Are you really a Frenchman?
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Aug 29th, 2007, 04:23 PM
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I don't think you are being silly. It seems that some of the ingredients used in France are not allowed in the US and are replaced by others. At least this is what I have heard.
Pvoyageuse is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 04:26 PM
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It has to do with age, as the previous poster stated. Also there are many "Fakes" out there, sold through discount chains, mail order, although probably not at large department stores.
Intex is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 04:36 PM
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Dear Cigalchanta:
Yes, of course the shelf life would make a difference, and I do believe with all the choices in the USA, some of our perfumes sit for a longer period of time. Going directly to the Chanel perfumerie probably insures a fresher line of perfume.

Dear Pyoyaguese: I have heard this as well but of course this can't be well advertised for commercial reasons. But I really do sense a difference in the basic essence of the perfume. Something headier.
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Aug 29th, 2007, 04:45 PM
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Many years ago I was told by a perfume seller in Paris that many perfumes that are ostensibly made in France are actually bottled elsewhere for the overseas market and are therefore different than those made, and sold, in Paris. Not idea if this is true but interesting anyway..
ekscrunchy is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 04:52 PM
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I hate to say it, but yes, you're being silly. But no sillier than the many people who swear the same wine at home doesn't taste half so good as it did in that Paris bistro.
NeoPatrick is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 04:54 PM
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I meant to say NO idea if this is true...
ekscrunchy is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 04:57 PM
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I gather you are saying that FRENCH perfume purchased THERE is better than FRENCH perfume purchased say, in NYC or London. Hmmm. Hard to prove.

However i DID pick up a fascinating explanation for the reasons classic French perfumes (alas for my pocketbook) are more appealing, as compared to highly-touted USA perfumes from American fashionhouses. This comes from the London Observer, answered by the beauty director,Conde Nast Asia:

Q & A -- Observer London June 30

"Do perfume manufacturers put a stronger, more lasting version in their tester bottles? And why do more established old-fashioned scents linger longer and cause more comment than newer, cheaper ones?"
Luciana Brett

ANSWER: "It would contravene the Trades Description Act to put stronger versions in testing bottles so it's unlikely. But your nose, for the truth of the matter, is completely accurate.

"Roja Dove, whose Haute Parfumerie at Harrods (0207 893 8797) aims to stock the best from the finest fragrance houses (including many that are in danger of being lost), is the expert to answer your question. He says that 'most modern fragrances are made with large amounts of chemicals and synthetics that mostly do not last. The famous classical fragrances, in contrast, often took years to create, using complex bases, costly natural ingredients and fixatives which allow the fragrance to 'open' and last longer both on your skin and in your memory.' In other words quality will out."
Beauty DIrector, conde Nast AsiaA
travelerjan is online now  
Aug 29th, 2007, 05:02 PM
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I was talking about French perfumes, and I think the others were as well. I thought that the classic Chanel #5 was a largely synthetic fragrance.
ekscrunchy is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 05:09 PM
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Interesting article on synthetics in perfumes, then and now:

http://www.chandlerburr.com/articles/synth5print.htm
ekscrunchy is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 05:30 PM
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Hi Neo - don't know if you were being cryptic in your post:

<<But no sillier than the many people who swear the same wine at home doesn't taste half so good as it did in that Paris bistro.>>

There is good, scientific reason for this. Many wines don't travel well.
As well, if the storage practises in the US are as dismal as those at the LCBO stores in Canada, temperature, humidity, careful handling, are unheard of. Many are stored upright.

robjame is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 05:30 PM
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ekscrunchy, interesting observation: Years ago my favorite perfume was called Civet, no longer produced because the basic ingredient was made from the gland of an animal. Since I have no desire to torture any animal to acquire their reproductive scents, I was more than happy to try any synthetic scents along these same lines. Unfortunately, nothing was as effective in producing the same results. For some reason, the raw sexual smell could not be simulated in a synthetic scent.

So now I have to wonder whether there are animal scents, banned in our country, that are being used in basic fragrances made in other countries?

I don't know that these ingredients would be disclosed or honestly if I would care. I don't seem to have a problem eating chicken for dinner, so I guess I'm not that much of a animal rights person.

Basically I guess I'm just intered in hearing the opinions of others/















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Dottee is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 06:14 PM
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Dottee, I am fairly sure that the civet used in perfumes is synthetic...this may not have been true in the past...
ekscrunchy is offline  
Aug 29th, 2007, 06:37 PM
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"Perfume -- Note that French perfume lasts longer than the U.S. counterpart of the same scent (it's made with potato alcohol, not grain alcohol), ...."
http://www.frommers.com/destinations...223027612.html
MademoiselleFifi is offline  
Sep 1st, 2007, 01:30 PM
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Thank you for this link, Madamoiselle Fifi! I'm going back in two months (getting close now!!) and the information on this site is wonderful.

Dottee
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