Ireland in May, and if so where?

Old Jan 17th, 2003, 07:15 AM
  #1  
Catherine
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Ireland in May, and if so where?

Is May a good time to visit Ireland? We would like to travel in May or June and Ireland is one of the destinations we have been considering. If it is a good time, can anyone recommend a 10 day itinerary?
Thanks,
Catherine
 
Old Jan 17th, 2003, 07:26 AM
  #2  
Sherry
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Hi Catherine. We will be traveling in May to Ireland. It is our first time. One thing I am looking forward to is that there are very long daylight days during this time. It does not get dark until after 9:00 at night or so depending if it is the beginning of the month or end if you go.
Makes it very nice for touring.
 
Old Jan 17th, 2003, 07:36 AM
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John
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Hi Catherine,

May is a great time to visit Ireland - and Ireland is well worth visiting.

U.S. folks tend to like the Southeast/Southwest part of Ireland. Many Europeans tend to gravitate to the North/Northwest.

Personally I like the Northwest - particularly the Fermenaugh and Donegal areas.

To do justice to any itinerary one would need to know your interests and objectives. Suggest you do a search on 'Ireland' to gather information and then repost with more specific questions.

Have a super trip.
 
Old Jan 17th, 2003, 08:13 AM
  #4  
s
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I went in May last year and it was great. Warmer than I expected. The forecast every day was "rain with periods of sunshine and dryness". We mostly had good days and Ireland is so lovely. I went on a lark with a friend and ended up falling in love with the country and the people.
 
Old Jan 17th, 2003, 09:21 AM
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Catherine
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Thanks for the advice - especially as it was what I was hoping to hear.
 
Old Jan 17th, 2003, 08:55 PM
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David D.
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Catherine,

Whatever you do, try to find time to explore two of the island's most under-explored and underrated regions, County Sligo and County Fermanagh. Pick up a good Ireland travel guide - like The Rough Guide - and look into the glorious northwest. It's beautiful touring country, chock full of ancient attractions, top-notch accommodations, stately houses, and much more.

Best of luck.
 
Old Jan 22nd, 2003, 01:22 PM
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k.shea
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Catherine, I agree with the poster about deciding what sites would interest you. I have completed several 10/11 day trips and my advice would be to not spread yourself too thin and spend more than one night in an area. This I learned from experience. You want to enjoy the areas more than passing through, you need to meet the people. I have made two trips in May and have found them to be wonderful because the tourists were few, the weather a bit warmer and the days longer. Try stradling May/June which could give you a better fare to boot. You may also want to plan on catching a festival in one of the towns. PS I'm glad to see that Sligo made the list, just wonderful. Go Yeats!
 
Old Jan 23rd, 2003, 02:21 PM
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bill
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No, no, no. Don't tell anyone about Sligo and then we can have it all to ourselves .

It is a beautiful area and not heavily traveled. Granted, like Beara, it probably doesn't have the infrastructure in place to handle an enormous onslaught of tourism. Other places, like Co. Roscommon & Leitrim and Fermanagh have even less of an infrastructure, but drive out of Boyle and in the direction of Enniskillen and you will see some beautiful scenery enroute. You won't see as many B&Bs as you see in Kerry and Cork though.

Bill
 
Old Jan 24th, 2003, 07:01 AM
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kshea
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Bill, I do so thoroughly agree with your position to preserve some part of Ireland, but lets face it the changes in the past ten years are frightening. I hope that the infrastructure never makes it to Beara or anywhere else that remains somewhat unspoilt. I spent a day/night in Sligo which was much too short but a great experience. When leaving we were traveling to Cavan and past through some of the area your mentioning and the scenary was very lovely. My guidebook had only glossed over Fermennaugh so I was quite pleased with the surprise. Anyway, May is a great time to visit.
 
Old Jan 24th, 2003, 01:00 PM
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Ann
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Bill, no worries that the less traveled places in Ireland will be overrun by tourists. No matter what, the hordes will still head for Killarney and Blarney Castle, Doolin, and the Ring of Kerry (no offense to Doolin and the Ring, which are lovely. Not so for the other two), while the rest of us enjoy the rest of this beautiful island.

The only thing I would avoid in Sligo is the National Famine Museum. Went last year with great anticipation, only to be very dissapointed. Definitely not worth a visit. You'd get much more information, presented in a more interesting way, in any book on the Famine.

In Fermanagh is a beautiful hotel called the Manor House Hotel. Stayed there just after 9/11, and it was a welcome refuge. I think it was voted hotel of the year in Ireland for 2001 or 2002.

Donegal is incredible, particularly the Inishowen Penisula/Malin Head area.

Couldn't beat 10 days where you drive from Dublin north toward Belfast, stopping off in Newgrange. Spend time in Belfast, the Mourne Mountains, Portaferry, Killyleagh (nice castle, neat little town), head up the Antrim Coast Road, hit Dunluce Castle, Carrick-a-Rede Bridge, Giant's Causeway, Bushmill's Distillery. Continue onto the city of Derry, do the walking tour of the city walls. Head up to the coast of Donegal. Depending on time, swing down into Fermanagh or Sligo, then drive like a maniace back to Dublin. Or fly into Shannon and do the reserve, stopping off at the Cliffs, do Connemara, see Kylemore Abbey, and then head north.

And yes, May is a great time to visit Ireland.
 
Old Jan 24th, 2003, 03:33 PM
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bill
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I agree Ann and K.shea. I need to explore the north more. I'm spending about 6 days in Donegal and Sligo in May and a few more in north Roscommon Leitrim Fermanaugh area. My sisters will be with me, so I'm giving them a quick shot at some of the more well known areas and also some time at my favorite area down south. Can't resist stopping at O'Sullivan's in Crookhaven. Ahhh the memories.

Bill
 
Old Jan 24th, 2003, 04:30 PM
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John
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Hi Catherine,

Ok, Ok, Ok, the Northwest is a bit off the beaten path of most folks - particularly those from the U.S.. But should we keep it a secret?

It really doesn't matter because too many tourists have found nirvana in the South and it will take years and years for the big wave to catch the North.

In the meantime, I intend to enjoy it.
 
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