Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

HOW TO REMEMBER MY EUROPEAN TOUR for a LIFETIME??

HOW TO REMEMBER MY EUROPEAN TOUR for a LIFETIME??

Old Feb 26th, 2001, 12:41 PM
  #1  
Tushar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
HOW TO REMEMBER MY EUROPEAN TOUR for a LIFETIME??

Dear Friends,

I am in a fix. I am visiting Europe for 3 full months and want to remember it for a long while. Earlier I was thinking of buying a camera but now have made up my mind that I am gonna get a camcorder/handycam. Being a student, i can't go for a digital one...it being awkwardly expensive!

How much would a SONY/CANON Handycam with an LCD display cost in Germany/Belgium. I will have to buy it there after I get My first stipend...and don't wanna take money from my folks! Which is the friendliest handycam...and the most worthy??

Help me out fellows.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 12:56 PM
  #2  
Patrick
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
My personal feelings are that I would not do a camcorder. First of all you miss too much of the actual experience because you are always running the camera. I believe in a decent point and shoot camera, perhaps with a zoom lens, but no other focusing or settings to worry about. I do a board of pictures above my desk after each trip for lasting memories, changing them from time to time. I sometimes enlarge and frame special pictures and hang them on a wall. My belief is that most people do video tapes and then they either bore their friends making them watch them, or they put it in a drawer and never look at it. You also don't need a digital if you have a scanner. I scan a favorite shot from time to time replacing my desktop background and screensavers with my own travel pictures.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 01:14 PM
  #3  
wes fowler
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I agree with Patrick; go for a point and shoot camera rather than a camcorder. You'll see far more. In addition, discipline yourself to maintain a daily journal or diary of your impressions and adventures. Another way to capture meaningful memories is to travel with a tape recorder. It's often the initial recorded impression that is more lasting than the journal or diary entry.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 01:31 PM
  #4  
CB
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I couldn't agree more with the above posts especially in regards to a journal. Jot down the places you visit, who you meet, your feelings and surprises you encounter, even the smallest ones. Years later when you pick up that journal you will be amazed how all those feelings and experiences you had come back to life that you thought you had forgotten. Well worth the time and effort.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 01:35 PM
  #5  
ann
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Another voice against the camcorder idea. I took video pics of my kids when they were little and no one ever looks at the tapes (they are teens now) yet they, and others, are always going through the photo albums, plus you can frame favorite shots. When traveling I personally use a more complex camera than a point and shoot but find I often set it to automatic. I'd get a small, simple but good quality camera.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 01:42 PM
  #6  
StCirq
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I have always thought that too many people spent too much time capturing the moment on film rather than experiencing the moment, but this could be because my mother-in-law has a camera surgically attached to her wrist. If you REALLY want to remember the trip, then you'll need to pay very close attention to it while it's happening, something you won't do if yuou're constantly fiddling with a camcorder. I agree with the posters above - take a point and shoot camera. In addition to their suggestions, you might consider collecting little bits of paraphernalia (sugar wrappers, brochures, ticket stubs....whatever)from your travels and creating a scrap book that includes your journal notes, photos, and little odds and ends you pick up that can be pasted into such a book. You can paste in maps, too. I know this sounds like a school project, but you can produce a beautiful book with lasting memories that are visual, tactile, and intellectual all in one. My kids have done this on a couple of trips, and the results are stunning.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 01:48 PM
  #7  
mark
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I'll chime in against the camcorder also. I suppose it would depend if you were going to walk around each day like a modern day cyclops or just occassionaly. I might consider doing it occassionaly but even then I would have to find the perfect spot and then shoot using a tripod and etc, etc, etc. To make really good videos requires a lot of time an attention. Invariably friend's trip videos I've had to endure are jumpy and shakey - to the point of making my eyes ache. Plus whenever I'm "forced" to watch a trip video I feel almost like ahostage - for some reason photos don't elicit the same reaction - how slide shows do. I would say spend less time trying to capture what your experiencing and just experience it - be with the moment not observing it.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 01:58 PM
  #8  
nancy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Tushar,
I agree with all the above posters.
Too much time would be spent with you behind the camcorder, recording, instead of enjoying.
Get a good camera, takes LOTS of film, buy postcards,take matchbooks, buy small momentos from your travels,(even postal stamps)Put it all together .
Buy a nice journal/notebook, and make yourself write something everyday, (even if it is only a few sentences about where you were that day)
I think this will serve you alot better than a "movie" of where you were.
Have a **great** 3 months of travel!!

 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 02:02 PM
  #9  
Ed
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Go for a point-and-shoot that is small, unobtrusive, and not a burden to carry. Have it with you at all times. THE best photo ops crop up only at times when you wouldn't normally be carrying your photo lab with you ... in restaurants, sitting in the park eating a picnic, riding the funicular, waiting for a train.

If you do the camcorder all you'll remember is traveling through Europe with your eye pressed to the viewfinder, never enjoying anything not brought to you through the lens.

Ed
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 02:35 PM
  #10  
Bob
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
We go to Europe at least 2 times a year and see very few video cameras anymore. The bloom seems to be off that rose. Most people are carrying very simple point and shoot cameras, as we do, and they do great. You can even do a digital camera and not worry about cost to develop film.

We were in Versailles in July and I watched a girl with a video walk the entire length of one hall with a video to her eye. She never looked at the "real" thing. She just videod and was on to the next thing to video. She actually missed the real experience and joy of "being there".

You will do much better with good photos, ticket stubs from areas toured, programs of plays, journal with impressions, etc. than a video. Put them all in one scrapbook upon your return and you will have a great memory book.

Just ask yourself: Would you watch a 3 month unedited video of someone else's trip?
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 02:57 PM
  #11  
Chet
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Tushar:

I agree wholeheartedly with most of the posters: No video; take a good lightweight point & shoot with at least a 105mm zoom. Nikon makes a great one. A journal with daily entries is essential. After three months, you will not remember where you were and what you did each day; everything becomes a blur. Buy your film in the US (much, much cheaper than europe). Take advantage of sales and "Dollars off" coupons. My experience has been one roll of 36 exp film for every 3-5 days of sightseeing. Be selective with your shots. Kodacolor ASA 200 is a good versatile film. Paste a number on each film cassette (not the container); keep a log of dates and subject matter for each cassette number. Put that same number on the envelope you use for developing the film. To avoid having film damaged by airport xray machines, store in a lead line film bag (available at any photo shop) and pack in your checked luggage. A couple dozen rolls of film in a lead bag can be heavy. Develop your film back home (Costco or Sam's Club), its too expensive in europe and prints weigh more than undeveloped film. Finally, I have found a photo album with pictures, maps, tourist brochures, ticket stubs,some narratives, etc. the best way to document a trip. We have been traveling to europe since 1978; some early trips used video and still photos. We never look at the videos, but often look through the photo albums. Enjoy your trip, and the memories later. Chet
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 03:30 PM
  #12  
Steve Mueller
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I apologize if I repeat something already stated above (I haven't read all of the responses). Those urging you to forget the camcorder are right on target. You can do so much more with conventional photographs: put them in an album, give a slide show (if you shoot slides), have your pictures enlarged, framed & hung over your fireplace (or in your office), display one or more of them as backdrops on your computer screen, post them to your website... The list goes on.

I spent a year in Japan and I had both my trusty Nikon and a Sony Handycam. I used the Nikon considerably more often. You quickly learn that, unless there is a lot of movement in a scene, an animated recording can be quite boring. I mainly used the camcorder for recording festivals and train rides. Also, pictures (even slides) can be shown fairly spontaneously. This is not true with video tape.

I envy the fact that you are able to spend three months in Europe. If you do buy a camera, don't be stingy with film. Shoot anything catches your fancy, and don't forget the "routine" parts of your trip (hotels, transportation, people you meet, etc.).
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 04:21 PM
  #13  
Scigirl
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I'm going to chime in here with another endorsement for journaling. I kept a journal on long trips in 1993 and 1999. In both cases I have gone back to the journal multiple times - and wished that I did a better job in 1993. Writing about your experiences, addresses of people you meet, places you stay, keeping ticket stubs, restaurant napkins, etc. will do more to jog your memory in the future than any other medium. It is also really neat to in later trips to be able to go back to some place you wrote about the first time and see how your experience has changed. So, write write write as much as you can during your trip - you'll be happy you did.

That said, lugging around a video camera just sounds dreadful - and you may encounter problems with systems between europe and US being incompatable in some way. (At the very least, voltage is different - which means that when you bring the camera home you may not be able to charge the battery again.) A lightweight camera with loads of film is likely to pack well, travel well, take a minimum or energy and time to use and yield loads of good pictures.

Enjoy your trip!
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 04:59 PM
  #14  
Mags
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Agree with everyone... I kept a journal everyday... not very detailed but all the important points. I found it very helpful that my photos had the date stamp. This combined with my notes as well as the suggested ollectibles.. helped me to make two absolutely beautiful scrap books after my last two trips to Europe in 1999 and 2000. I go back very often to 'relive'my fabulous vacations.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 05:01 PM
  #15  
Patrick
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
This is amazing. Although I was first to post to this question, I thought I'd be bombarded with people disagreeing with me. I have friends who digital camera and camcorder their entire vacations to death and really thought that I'd be in the minority. I'm so glad that others agree with me. My favorite experiences are watching people video camera into the sky or up the street and miss the activity of the moment that usually far surpasses the thing they are trying desparately to record for posterity.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 05:42 PM
  #16  
Amy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Journal and a point and shoot, yes! Camcorder, no!
The only trip I've been on with a camcorder (a traveling partnter's, not mine--I often forget to take regular pix when I get involved) the camcorder was in the way and the resulting film, even edited, was only watched once.
Journal, scrapbooks, chocolate bar wrappers, odd bits of poetry, books and CD's from the places...but the best, of course, is what will live in your memory.
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 05:58 PM
  #17  
Con
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
We have a wonderful scrapbook compiled by my late motherinlaw for her first trip to Europe in 1930 at the age of 28.
40 days, $440, France, Swizterland, Passion Play, The Rhine, Belgium, Holland, England

She sailed on the Rotterdam and kept everthing -vintage Bon Voyage cards from her friends, a ship's menu, passender list (student third class), program from the Moulin Rouge, postcards, photos, a pressed mountain rose from the Alps. It is so much fun to look through. And there's a separate journal, too!
I don't think you could do better than this combination. Maybe invest in a really good scrapbook with archival paper so that the pages don't fall apart the way my 10 year old one did! The 70-year-old is in great sbspe!
Have fun
Con
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 07:58 PM
  #18  
russi
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I bought the smallest camera I could find which uses APS film (like Advantex). The case has a slot so you can wear is on your belt. It's like a large pager. It has a zoom lens and panarama setting as well. It's was very unobtrusive and superfast to get out of the case for capturing the moment.

Also, get business cards, matches, tickets, etc. for all the places you go. Jot a note or two on the back. Great for making a scrap book. I also found that my mother saved all the post cards I sent home. I love these because the excitment really comes through in the short space. Have fun!
 
Old Feb 26th, 2001, 08:58 PM
  #19  
Art
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Although I do carry a digital vidio camera, I use it less than my 35mm. I like to catch some things on vidio but find that most times my 35mm is better. One suggestion would be to bing your film back and have it developed on the web or CD. I then print out the sizes that I wish and make my photo albums. I used to take slides (much cheaper) but then I have to pull out the slide projector, put up the screen etc. I liked slides as you can blow up the pictures on the screen. Printing them out on 8 by 11 makes a very nice size and you don't have to pull out eauipment to do it.
Most of all enjoy your trip and bring memories back.
Art
 
Old Feb 27th, 2001, 06:30 AM
  #20  
AC
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Hi Tushar:
I agree with everyone and especially enjoyed mark's "modern day cyclops". I laugh everytime I think about it. In addition to all the good ideas here, I also carry the disposable cameras with a flash attachment. That is for the day I have a great shot and my battery has gone weak or dead!. It happened a few times so now I know I won't miss the great shots.
I also keep a journal, postcards, stubs etc. They are just somwthing extra for wonderful memeories. Have fun!
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:11 PM.