How common are internet cafes REALLY?

Dec 9th, 2004, 10:17 AM
  #41  
 
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We found internet access widely available, until you really need it, when the cafes seem to close or disappear.

As to carrying you own or using theirs, I prefer to have my own, both for convenience (it's easier to refind sites you have kept on your machine than to locate them anew on another machine) and for security (there is no way to make certain that a borrowed machine is not keeping a record of what you have done, to include passwords). Also, a pc of some sort would be handy for providing entertainment on the long flights, and for storing any digital images one might acquire.
clevelandbrown is offline  
Dec 9th, 2004, 10:28 AM
  #42  
 
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Thank you for sorting this out Judy. Perhaps I'll not put periods at the end of URLs in the future! So sorry for any confusion.
-Sharon
SharonNRayMc is offline  
Dec 9th, 2004, 10:33 AM
  #43  
 
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Hello Sharon,

I've run into this problem myself when I've posted URLs on discussion forums. A solution that seems to work is to insert a space between the end of the URL and the period.
Judy_in_Calgary is offline  
Dec 9th, 2004, 10:44 AM
  #44  
 
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excellent advice Judy...
SharonNRayMc is offline  
Dec 9th, 2004, 11:15 AM
  #45  
 
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Thanks, Judy!
Marilyn is offline  
Dec 9th, 2004, 11:55 AM
  #46  
rex
 
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As I mentioned on this thread - - http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...2&tid=34545295 - - I am very set on using "space/dash/space/dash/space" around any URL and thus avoid the problem of any punctuation mark "touching" up against it. For the same reason, I won't put a URL in parenthese (generally). It does mean altering a sentence so that it doesn't fall at the end, more or less - - or simply adding some little tidbit of run-on thought after the second set of " - - ".


rex is offline  
Dec 9th, 2004, 01:21 PM
  #47  
 
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I just start a new line:

http://www.fodors.com/forums/threadselect.jsp?fid=2&tid=34545250
Robespierre is offline  
Dec 9th, 2004, 11:00 PM
  #48  
 
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Hi

I spent 6 months "on the road" in 1999.

Even then I was able to check mails every couple of days in Denmark, Holland, Belgium, Germany, France, Spain, Italy.

Easiest way is to ask at the local tourist office : they keep a list.

And larger French post offices have a cybercafe service.

I've got some notes here :
http://www.the-languedoc-page.com/la...sm-contact.htm

And here is a typical "find" :
http://tlp.netfirms.com/ribansolette.htm

Peter
mpprh is offline  
Dec 10th, 2004, 08:32 AM
  #49  
 
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The first one I ever used was in Crete in 1998.
grandmere is offline  
Dec 11th, 2004, 11:20 AM
  #50  
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Wow! So many responses, thanks.

Most of you echo my inital reaction, namely that it's probably not a good idea for a young budget traveller to bring a notebook PC along. Even with an 'ultraportable' 12-inch PowerBook, although the weight is tolerable, it seems too tempting a theft magnet.

I suspect son will acknowledge most of these opinions, especially since anything NOT the parent's opinion is automatically more credible

Personally, I always prefer to travel with my PC, but then again I don't go the budget route w/ multi-occupant dorm rooms, etc.

PC ownership in europe must be much lower than USA to account for all these public cyber cafes, but that should work to son's advantage during his travels.

Among my (mainly UK) european work colleagues, it seems a home PC is something of a luxury, whereas in USA colleagues and friends often have at least 2 and sometimes 3 in the household.
tom_h is offline  
Dec 11th, 2004, 11:50 AM
  #51  
 
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By the way, Tom_h, in looking for something completely different in my travel journal, I came across the rate that the Internet cafe in Budapest charged us.

It was 10 forints (0.05 USD) per minute. So 10 minutes cost 100 forints (0.50 USD), 20 minutes cost 200 forints (1.00 USD), 30 minutes cost 300 forints (1.50 USD), and so on.
Judy_in_Calgary is offline  
Dec 11th, 2004, 06:25 PM
  #52  
 
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ANOTHER PROBLEM-ELECTRIC CURRENT. Along with risk of theft, loss, damage on a prolonged trip, and the hassle of dragging it with him everyday, there is another consideration that I did not see mentioned- Differences in electric current and plugs. Although convertors are available, they never really do a great job, and I know of two people who tried to use convertors, for their U.S. purchased computer after moving to Europe. They said, their computers still tended to be hotter than normal, and ultimately had to buy new computers. I have been in third world countries where clean safe running water has yet to come into existence, but could find 5 internet cafes. Leave the computer home. IfIt is not worth it.
SandyD1 is offline  
Dec 11th, 2004, 06:27 PM
  #53  
 
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ANOTHER PROBLEM-ELECTRIC CURRENT. Along with risk of theft, loss, damage on a prolonged trip, and the hassle of dragging it with him everyday, there is another consideration that I did not see mentioned- Differences in electric current and plugs. Although convertors are available, they never really do a great job, and I know of two people who tried to use convertors, for their U.S. purchased computer after moving to Europe. They said, their computers still tended to be hotter than normal, and ultimately had to buy new computers. I have been in third world countries where clean safe running water has yet to come into existence, but could find 5 internet cafes. Leave the computer home. It is not worth it. If a place has an internet connection to access with his own computer, then it will undoubtedly have a computer that he can use.
SandyD1 is offline  
Dec 11th, 2004, 06:48 PM
  #54  
 
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For those who particularly want internet access just for email, may I suggest something that has been enormously successful for us? Try Pocketmail! ( www.pocketmail.com )

I have the $49 device - it is the size of a small paperback book, has a screen and a regular QWERTY keyboard. It sends and receives email by holding it up to any phone receiver and transmitting what sounds like a fax.

You have to buy a service plan that costs about $15 a month, and I just use my MCI calling card to dial the Pocketmail phone number from anywhere in the world. (There are toll-free numbers to call if you're in the US.)

I love it because it is small and lightweight and cheap, I can compose email anytime I want - on the train, in the hotel room, etc. - and after I transmit through the phone line, I can read the email I received whenever I feel like it.

I also store lots of info on it - itineraries, contact info, phone numbers, etc. It can't access the Web, and it can't store photos, but it sure is a lot easier to carry than a PC.

Internet cafes are great for checking other things and getting information, but I think this is the easiest, cheapest, most convenient access to email while traveling.

Geez, I sound like an ad for the company...I promise, they're not paying me to say this!


- Jessica
jessw is offline  
Dec 11th, 2004, 07:09 PM
  #55  
 
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Actually, Jessica, most European triband cell phones can do all that and more, at a lesser price. If someone is going to be traveling in Europe for an extended period and wants to make calls anywhere in the world, take photos, and send e-mail, a European cell phone for about $100 even at today's exchange rate can do that.
What they can't do, to my knowledge, is allow you to make documents, such as a travel journal - not that this poster was necessarily looking to do that.
StCirq is offline  
Feb 8th, 2005, 09:01 PM
  #56  
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An update -- my son's been in UK & Spain for couple weeks so far. In 3 hostels, each one has offered PC access either for free, or for a modest fee. One hostel even had a wireless network!

So far it's not been a problem accessing internet or email.

Due to lingering concerns regarding security (eg, keystroke loggers and other spyware), he's choosing not to access bank accounts or other critical info via web.
tom_h is offline  

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