Help: Youth Hostels in Germany.

Feb 12th, 2001, 11:01 PM
  #1  
kin
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Help: Youth Hostels in Germany.

Hey,
I will be staying in Germany from May 2001 to July 2001. I'll be provided accomodation in Pforzheim by the company I'll be working for. But when I'll go out to other places where should I stay. Someone suggested me to aquire youth club membership and to stay at youth hostels. Will it really help? Are youth hostel good? Will the youth club membership reduce the travelling, accomodation and similar charges? Someone, please, give me some information about all this.
Looking forward to your comments and suggestions.
Kin
 
Feb 12th, 2001, 11:18 PM
  #2  
Gar
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shure, Youth hostels will keep Your travel budged low. But it depend on what comfort You are looking. Usually they are clean and it is a good way to meet other travellers. But in summer month (june/july) You had to bood in advance, they are very often sold out. If You wanna go perhaps to regions like Garmisch or to bigger cities (Hamburg) You will not find a place in the hostels, they are still full from the beginning of the year. The other thing is to go to the tourist information. Nearly every region or touristic village has one. And it is easy to find in the www. Sometime they dont have any site in english, but You can email them, they will answer. They know the cheapest accomodantion and will help You for shure.
Have fun in Pforzheim
Gar
 
Feb 13th, 2001, 03:43 AM
  #3  
Hans H
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The problem with the official youth hostels in Germany is that they were intended for teenagers travelling alone (and it's partly still that way). This means that many of the rules in the hostels were intended for 15-years old which need some supervision by an adult (at least in the opinion of their parents). The supervision was provided by the manager of the youth hostel. This includes curfews and other rules which are rather annoying for someone older than 18 who doesn't want any supervision.

By now, there are quite a lot of private hostels which offer a cheap place to sleep and couldn't care less what anyone does as long as he doesn't disturb the other guests. The "official" hostels of the International Youth Hostel Association have changed somewhat and offer more flexibility, especially in large towns but their main advantage is in my opinion, that a lot of them exist and that they normally have to fulfill a certain standard.

The membership in the youth hostel organization is, at least in some parts of Germany, required for sleeping in an official youth hostel. But the membership is quite cheap. (You can certainly look it up at the website of the Jugendherbergs-Verein.) The alternative are the private accomodations (private hostels, guest rooms etc.) and camping grounds. If you don't mind camping, you can normally get a cheaper place to sleep which offers additional flexibility since many camping grounds still have a free place when the rest of the town is packed.

 
Feb 13th, 2001, 03:57 AM
  #4  
Russ
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HI, KIN.

Youth hostels are a good way to travel cheaply. Often, you pay as little as $10 US per night for a bed and breakfast; larger, nicer hostels in big cities cost a little more. I often use them myself when traveling in Germany. Purchase a membership in your own country's youth hostel association, and you can use your identification card in Germany at any of the more than 600 youth hostels that belong to DJH, the German youth hostel association. There are also a few private hostels in larger cities like Munich and Berlin that have no membership requirement.

Actually, I have found that many German hostels are much easier to get into in the summer than at other times. German schools often send large group of kids with their teachers on field trips to other towns, and sometimes, hostels can be full during school months -- full of noisy little kids. But I've been almost alone in some hostels during late July, when kids not in school. You'll find that what Gar said is true about hostels in big cities -- you should book in advance if possible -- and hostels that are very popular, like the one in Bacharach that is housed in a castle, also should be booked in advance.

Here's the German youth hostel website:
http://www.djh.de/international/index.htm

And here's a page where you can search for a hostel:
http://www.djh.de/international/comp02.htm
 
Feb 13th, 2001, 11:14 AM
  #5  
kin
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Thank you guys.
You really took trouble to give such precious suggestions to me. I am really very thankful to you.
Russ, I will visit the URL you gave in your posting, but I am not sure if I would be able to find out where I can apply for the membership in India.
advice me.
kin
 
Feb 13th, 2001, 07:01 PM
  #6  
Russ
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It took a few clicks, but here's your contact info in India:

Youth Hostels Association of India
5 Nyaya Marg
Chanakyapuri
New Delhi - 110 021
INDIA

Tel: (91) (11) 6871969,6110250
Fax: (91) (11) 6113469
Email: [email protected]


If you aren't able to get a membership pass or if it's very expensive, you can also use hostels by paying a small additional fee to purchase "welcome stamps" at each hostel you visit. After you're welcome stamps have reached a certain value (I think it's around $20 US), you don't have to buy anymore. The stamps are for temporary visitors to the country only -- it seems like you'd qualify!
 
Feb 14th, 2001, 12:29 PM
  #7  
kin
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Thank you Russ.
i think this informaiton would be of great use for me. i'll try to get the membership soon as the place (in the address you gave) is not far from my residence.
thanx again pal
kin
 

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